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Pizza - The Best Methods And Techniques to Make it At Home

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3 hours ago, Simul Parikh said:

Okay... read the whole thread... Now, gonna try the dough recipe from 2005, and cook it on the gas grill. Put it on a cast iron stone, get it hot as possible, 2-3 minutes on one side, flip it, put toppings/sauce/cheese on, close the lid. Another 3-4 minutes. Sound about right? 

Couple of things

1) Can you use fresh mozzarella on the grill or will it not melt properly and you gotta use the shredded in the bag stuff?

2) Has anyone used any of those pizza stone boxes that trap the convection heat? Is there a low budget-DIY solution? Sounds like bricks on the side and another stone on top is the most used one?

3) As far as store bought dough in this era (in case it's not that fun making the dough), TJ's still pretty good? Whole Foods? Teeter's? Anywhere else in Del Ray/OT/South Arlington? Don't feel like driving to Italian Store... 

4) Sounds like meats have to be cooked. What about things like onions, green peppers, jalapenos, shrooms?

5) Why is rolling with a pin bad and hand stretching preferred?

Man, the pizzamaking forum is craaaaaaaaaazy ... I jumped in that rabbit hole and couldn't escape for a long time. Needed something a little less hard core for attempt #1

 

2) When I was making pizza on the grill or in the oven used to use cheap red tile picked up from a tile store. Keep the heat and was only $10-5 at the time. Also instead of getting a pizza box just make an aluminum foil tent for the pizza. That helps to cook the toppings at the same rate as the crust. 

3) In my experience, Vace, Italian Store and then Whole Foods for premade dough. Recently, I've been going to the Italian Gourmet in Vienna, VA have noticed they have premade dough just haven't tried it out yet. They also have meats that would be good for pizzas.

4) Depending upon the thickness of the meats that you will use. If they are thicker that a 1/6 inch I would sauce them before hand. 

5) I always used a combination of hand stretching and pin rolling but I also let the dough rise twice. My dough recipe is a modified Margarita one which lends itself to be pushed out after the second rising. 

Pizza making is hard core for some. I went thru my own obsessive phase especially when I was making Chicago style stuffed pizza from scratch. But have fun experimenting! Its good to have parties for 6-8 and make the dough in advance and try and out different toppings. 

 

 

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We regularly make delicious pizza at home on a gas grill, but use a slightly less fancy approach that might interest you: Early in the day, we'll make pizza dough using "00" pizza flour. When it's time to make the pizza, we use a regular pizza stone (bought at Target), and heat it on the grill (around 15 minutes) to the highest possible grill temp (usually around 550). While this is happening, we spread the dough on the kitchen counter using a roller (we don't have the skill to do it by hand), then transfer the rolled-out dough to a pizza peel that has been covered in corn meal (or something that will prevent it from sticking). We fully dress the pizza on the peel (using all types of ingredients, including fresh mozz, shredded stuff, veggies, and meats). Then I slide the pizza off the peel and onto the hot pizza stone. Depending on toppings and personal preference, it usually takes about 7-12 minutes to fully cook. Yum!

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1 hour ago, Dr. Delicious said:

We regularly make delicious pizza at home on a gas grill, but use a slightly less fancy approach that might interest you: Early in the day, we'll make pizza dough using "00" pizza flour. When it's time to make the pizza, we use a regular pizza stone (bought at Target), and heat it on the grill (around 15 minutes) to the highest possible grill temp (usually around 550). While this is happening, we spread the dough on the kitchen counter using a roller (we don't have the skill to do it by hand), then transfer the rolled-out dough to a pizza peel that has been covered in corn meal (or something that will prevent it from sticking). We fully dress the pizza on the peel (using all types of ingredients, including fresh mozz, shredded stuff, veggies, and meats). Then I slide the pizza off the peel and onto the hot pizza stone. Depending on toppings and personal preference, it usually takes about 7-12 minutes to fully cook. Yum!

Interesting .. So you don't have to flip it? You don't seem to get the problem of a overly done bottom and not cooked enough top? Maybe I'll try it this way tonight for attempt number one.

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17 minutes ago, Simul Parikh said:

You don't seem to get the problem of a overly done bottom and not cooked enough top?

Nope.

I will add that the reverse (overdone top, soft crust) is a problem when doing everything above the same, but cooking in the oven in stead of on the grill. We made the switch to the grill 6 months ago, and it changed our lives.

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Kenji Lopez-Alt prepared a guide to grilling pizza here .  I have yet to grill pizza but have followed his other pizza recipes (NY, Sicilian, Neapolitan) successfully.  You’ll see that he weighs his ingredients when making dough.  I find I get better results when I weigh ingredients (I prefer metric measures).  Good luck.

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Okay, so decently successful.

Dough - 1/2 "00" and 1/2 all purpose - 2 c each. 3/4 tsp yeast x 2. 2 tsp salt. About 2 c water. 2 tsp olive oil from Croatia. Coursely mixed, then rested for 15 min. Then 3 minutes kneading. Then separated into four balls and put in fridge for 24 hours.

Sauce - sautéed 2 tbsp garlic, added 28 oz whole peeled tomatoes puréed, about a tsp of salt and tsp of pepper, simmered for 30 min.

Got dough out, it had risen some but not as much as I thought it would. Made 4 quite thin ten inch crusts. Topped with 3 large table spoons of sauce, then about 4 oz of fresh mozzarella and 2ish tbsp of grana padano Parmesan flakes. 

Heated oven to 550 with cast iron stone (decided not to grill) for over an hour. Smoke detector intermittently went off. Ugh. Placed pie and cooked for about 4.5 minutes. Cut up fresh basil (Ref: DiFara's) and topped. Scissor cut. Made four pies.

Good: it's pizza, bro, of course it's good. Outer crust better than in the middle. Sauce was good. Parmesan was a nice touch.

Eh: hard to char at that temp without burning cheese. A real conundrum. Also, slightly soupy in middle (in 2 of the pies).

Bad: smoke detector!! Annoying.

Anyway, I had 5 happy friends and we enjoyed ourselves. I think oven is more suited to Sicilian, or as I grew up with, Detroit style pizza. Will try that next. I'm a little obsessed, though.

image.jpeg

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1 hour ago, Tweaked said:

Serious Eats' Upside Down Sicilian Pizza is seriously good.  And since it is cooked in a sheet pan much easier to put together.  I've made it 4 or 5 times and it's always turned out great.

 

Pizza Sicilian.jpg

I fully agree--great recipe. I've only made it once so far, and 12 oz of pepperoni was too much for my tastes, and the result was much too salty.  The crust, however, was perfect. 

 

Nice picture, btw!

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2 hours ago, Simul Parikh said:

That's what I used!

Yes, your mention of the recipe up thread reminded me of the NYT article and video. The one time I tried it, I thought the crust had really good flavor. I had a little trouble getting the moisture content right. I need to find the time to try again.

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I read about a cold rise pizza dough for a while now. I keep wanting to make it but keep putting it off because it's a little bit of a pain. I need to dust that recipe off finally and try it.

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Cross posting with the Dinner thread.

We bought fresh dough and mozzarella from Vace, I had some leftover pasta sauce in the freezer, and I slow cooked some onion until they started to get a bit caramelized.  I'll have to say, we were pretty impressed with the Vace dough.  I left it on the kitchen counter for a couple of hours and it continued to ferment and expand.  We were able to make two medium sized pizzas.  I cranked the gas oven to 550 degrees, cooked them on heavy weight 1/4 sheet hotel pans for 10 minutes.  I probably could have pushed them to 12 minutes to toast the crust and mozz a little more.  Expect the pizza crust to come out a little more bread-y and soft rather than chewy and crisp.   But overall, great success.

PizzaVaceStyle.jpg

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On 2/19/2019 at 12:34 PM, Tweaked said:

We bought fresh dough and mozzarella from Vace, I had some leftover pasta sauce in the freezer, and I slow cooked some onion until they started to get a bit caramelized.  I'll have to say, we were pretty impressed with the Vace dough.  I left it on the kitchen counter for a couple of hours and it continued to ferment and expand.  We were able to make two medium sized pizzas.  I cranked the gas oven to 550 degrees, cooked them on heavy weight 1/4 sheet hotel pans for 10 minutes.  I probably could have pushed them to 12 minutes to toast the crust and mozz a little more.  Expect the pizza crust to come out a little more bread-y and soft rather than chewy and crisp.   But overall, great success.

Pizza looks good! Can't go wrong with the basics from Vace. 

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