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Scrapple is an amalgam of pig leftovers, ground with flour, cornmeal and spices and pressed into a block. On the way to the beach you will pass the original Rapa Scrapple factory, it smells a bit. You can get Rapa at local Giant stores and maybe Safeway. This is my Father's Day breakfast every year and I am not afraid to eat it more often than that. In college the scrapple and american cheese sandwich on wheat toast was a go to hangover cure at Linda's Cafe in Lexington Park. MD

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Scrapple is an amalgam of pig leftovers, ground with flour, cornmeal and spices and pressed into a block. On the way to the beach you will pass the original Rapa Scrapple factory, it smells a bit. You can get Rapa at local Giant stores and maybe Safeway. This is my Father's Day breakfast every year and I am not afraid to eat it more often than that. In college the scrapple and american cheese sandwich on wheat toast was a go to hangover cure at Linda's Cafe in Lexington Park. MD
So, what's the best way to eat it? Plain, with syrup, or what? I've lived in this area for 33 years ( :unsure: ) and have never tasted scrapple, although I knew about it from someone in California who grew up in Baltimore. She rather sheepishly confessed to loving the stuff.
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So, what's the best way to eat it? Plain, with syrup, or what? I've lived in this area for 33 years ( :unsure: ) and have never tasted scrapple, although I knew about it from someone in California who grew up in Baltimore. She rather sheepishly confessed to loving the stuff.
The +1, being a Philadelphian, loves him some scrapple. He prefers spicy, and usually eats it with syrup on... although on our last trip back up to his hometown, we saw scrapple with syrup in it (a la maple sausage).

If you're too afraid to try the actual thing, apparently the meatloaf at the Old Dominion brewpub comes out quite close in texture and spiciness.

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So, what's the best way to eat it? Plain, with syrup, or what? I've lived in this area for 33 years ( :unsure: ) and have never tasted scrapple, although I knew about it from someone in California who grew up in Baltimore. She rather sheepishly confessed to loving the stuff.

Scrapple is rather savory, so I think syrup might be a nice contrast. I've always dipped it in a little ketchup. Hot sauce and a sunny side up egg with runny yolk would be nice, as would a fried egg sandwich.

To heat it you slice and either pan fry/griddle in a little bit of oil, or grill.

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So, what's the best way to eat it? Plain, with syrup, or what? I've lived in this area for 33 years ( :unsure: ) and have never tasted scrapple, although I knew about it from someone in California who grew up in Baltimore. She rather sheepishly confessed to loving the stuff.
We always ate it with ketchup. It had to be Habersetts Scrapple. I've never found another kind remotely as good. I used to buy it in bulk when I was back visiting home (Delaware County, PA) and keep it in the freezer for times when I had to have some. I don't get up there any more.

I've tried making it at home, using this recipe. It's good but quite labor intensive.

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We always ate it with ketchup.
Sour Cream also goes well with it
Blasphemy! Heretics! Puh-leeze. Would you top fois gras with "ketchup" ??!! Request maple syrup to be served with dim sum??!! I think not. Scrapple is a stand-alone dish; each bite is to be savored, relished, enjoyed -- sans embellishment. Sour cream? You should hang your heads in shame, you so-called scrapple lovers. Humph!
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I had never tasted scrapple before. It just wasn't a part of my mom's repertoire, which to be fair was mainly Chinese, plus whatever could be made by the latest kitchen appliance she'd received for Christmas. And so when my ex-roommate heard that I had the slightest curiousity about scrapple, being a onetime country boy he volunteered to fry up a bunch for breakfast. We shared a fondness for puns, along with his then-girlfriend and a couple of our mutual nerdly friends, and thus the Scrapple, Scrabble™, Scramble breakfast was born. A proper fry-up with eggs, accompanied by vicious, no-holds-barred word gaming. The maple letter tiles would be about the only low-cholesterol item handled that morning.

It was a rousing success, and yet nobody ever agitated for a sequel. No one remembers who won the game that day some dozen years ago, but I still feel like reaching for the salt and butter whenever I close in on a Triple Word Score.

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Blasphemy! Heretics! Puh-leeze. Would you top fois gras with "ketchup" ??!! Request maple syrup to be served with dim sum??!! I think not. Scrapple is a stand-alone dish; each bite is to be savored, relished, enjoyed -- sans embellishment. Sour cream? You should hang your heads in shame, you so-called scrapple lovers. Humph!
I think the ketchup originated with the fact that we originally ate it with fried potatoes, which were also served with ketchup. To this day, I like link sausage with maple syrup, because I remember pancakes and sausage as a kid, where the syrup pooled around the sausage. I think scrapple would be good with maple syrup too. For breakfast foods, I tend to think the condiments used for one item transcend the specific foods.
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Having grown up in southern Delaware, scrapple is definitely one of my favorite comfort foods. The key is cutting a thick enough slice to allow for a nice crunchy exterior and a soft interior. Scrapple and egg sandwiches were popular, since 2 slices of scrapple (side by side) is close to the same size as a slice of bread. Eating scrapple with syrup on it is/was quite common too, although I never enjoyed it that way. Most markets around here carry Rapa scrapple - in the same general area as the bacon.

Read the ingredients list on a package of scrapple sometime... if you still eat it, then you're a real scrapple fan!

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Having grown up in southern Delaware, scrapple is definitely one of my favorite comfort foods. The key is cutting a thick enough slice to allow for a nice crunchy exterior and a soft interior. Scrapple and egg sandwiches were popular, since 2 slices of scrapple (side by side) is close to the same size as a slice of bread. Eating scrapple with syrup on it is/was quite common too, although I never enjoyed it that way. Most markets around here carry Rapa scrapple - in the same general area as the bacon.

Read the ingredients list on a package of scrapple sometime... if you still eat it, then you're a real scrapple fan!

That is great advice for the uninitiated! There's just something about an egg with either scrapple or taylor ham to bring you back.

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We shared a fondness for puns, along with his then-girlfriend and a couple of our mutual nerdly friends, and thus the Scrapple, Scrabble™, Scramble breakfast was born. A proper fry-up with eggs, accompanied by vicious, no-holds-barred word gaming. The maple letter tiles would be about the only low-cholesterol item handled that morning.

It was a rousing success, and yet nobody ever agitated for a sequel. No one remembers who won the game that day some dozen years ago, but I still feel like reaching for the salt and butter whenever I close in on a Triple Word Score.

Every year on or around his birthday, hubby Azami hosts a "Trains and Scrapple" event at our house. It started when he discovered another person in the area who a) was interested in N-scale model Japanese railroads, and :unsure: had a wife who would not eat scrapple. They got together at his friend's house, ate scrapple, and ran trains. I'm told that at the first event, the host offered three kinds of scrapple: Delaware, Maryland, and Pennsylvania. It's been a tradition now for six years, and has grown to ten people, a homemade crumb cake, and an ever-increasing amount of scrapple.
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So, what's the best way to eat it? Plain, with syrup, or what? I've lived in this area for 33 years ( :unsure: ) and have never tasted scrapple, although I knew about it from someone in California who grew up in Baltimore. She rather sheepishly confessed to loving the stuff.

Cox family method....Cut thick blocks, flour, fry in one of those old school electric fry pans, do not forget to season liberally with salt and pepper. Also acceptable, the aforementioned wonder bread-kraft cheese-scrapple sandwich. My dad used to make these mojo potato things like the ones at the old Shakey's buffet, excellent partner. Did I mention that we're both a little heavy into fried stuff?

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You can buy it at Eastern Market. Mel, the poultry guy, sells a turkey version that is much better than it sounds.

You can get locally produced Tamworth pork scrapple from Cedarbrook Farm at the Dupont Circle farmers market (Sunday mornings) and the Silver Spring and H Street farmers markets (Saturday mornings). It is less fatty and has a greater percentage of cornmeal than Rapa brand.

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Went on a scrapple scramble this weekend in Phlly. Car-less so was limited to the convention center area. Ended up at the Reading Market only to be told -- at two locations -- that breakfast was over and they were no longer serving scrapple. (Since when does a place with "diner" in its name ever stop serving breakfast?) Identified a shop in a food court that served Sunday breakfast and served scrapple. I was in heaven only to be told "no scrapple... ran out... come back Monday." :)

[Puh-leeze! Does anyone else realize how ludicrous this statement was? If they didn't have scrapple on Sunday, would they really have it on Monday, a holiday? And, even if they did get a Monday delivery, would it have been delivered in time for breakfast?]

Oh, the heartache!

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To be filed in the "As if I really need an excuse" category. Several friends, tired of me extolling the merits of scrapple, have offered to treat me to a post-birthday scrapple meal. Several places come to mind: Bob & Ediths, Nick's (University & Viers Mill Rd.), Florida Avenue Grill, Tastee Diner (all locations?). Other suggestions for where to go to eat scrapple? Preferably with banquettes and bar stools.

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To be filed in the "As if I really need an excuse" category. Several friends, tired of me extolling the merits of scrapple, have offered to treat me to a post-birthday scrapple meal. Several places come to mind: Bob & Ediths, Nick's (University & Viers Mill Rd.), Florida Avenue Grill, Tastee Diner (all locations?). Other suggestions for where to go to eat scrapple? Preferably with banquettes and bar stools.

When you go, be sure they will fry it (i.e. saute it) in a pan or on the griddle, preferably in a little butter. I once ordered some at Woodside Deli in SS and it came out obviously having been done it the fryer. I sent it back, but couldn't get them to do it in a pan, so ended up eating ham with my eggs.

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