Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
DonRocks

The 2014 U.S. Open Tennis Championships, August 25 - September 8, 2014

Recommended Posts

I got a text message on my phone this morning from a friend up at the U.S. Open (official website):

"Fed needs Murray or Stan to beat Jokodick."

He's right. Federer does not want to meet Djokovic in the finals like he did at Wimbledon; he'd much rather face Murray or Wawrinka (of course this all assumes he'll get past Berdych in the semis, and for that matter, Monfils in the quarters (which he should - Federer has pretty much of a dream draw)).

(Recall that Rafael Nadal missed the tournament this year with a wrist injury.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Perhaps he'll face Nishikori?

I can't tell whether or not you're kidding.

Stranger things have happened!

And, Nishikori is being coached by Michael Chang.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't tell whether or not you're kidding.

Stranger things have happened!

And if Cilic keeps playing like this (he's ahead of Berdych 6-2, 3-1), Federer does not have a Bye to the finals.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm pulling for Federer too. We're both over the hill at 33.

Bob and Mike Bryan ("The Bryan Brothers") are one match away from winning their 100th doubles title.

"Into Finals, Bryan Brothers A Win Away From History" by Nicholas McCarvel on usopen.org

Serena Williams has apparently gotten over her debilitating virus although she just doesn't look ... happy.

"Women's Semis Highlight Day 12" by Mark Preston on usopen.org

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, last night I went to sleep with Gael Monfils ahead of Roger Federer 2 sets to 0.

I awoke, and Federer came back to win the final 3 sets.

Based on what I saw, this must have been an incredible comeback.

"On Way Out, Federer Makes A U-Turn" by Christopher Clarey on nytimes.com

"Federer Saves 2 Match Points, Makes US Open Semi-Finals" on cbsnews.com

Day 11 Recap: Federer Fights Back, Cilic Flies Through" by E.J. Crawford on usopen.org

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, last night I went to sleep with Gael Monfils ahead of Roger Federer 2 sets to 0.

I awoke, and Federer came back to win the final 3 sets.

Based on what I saw, this must have been an incredible comeback.

it was sick!

Federer fought back against 2 match points in the fourth set and after that, the wind pretty much came out of Monfils' sails and the 5th set was quickly over.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, last night I went to sleep with Gael Monfils ahead of Roger Federer 2 sets to 0.

I awoke, and Federer came back to win the final 3 sets.

Based on what I saw, this must have been an incredible comeback.

 

You should have stayed awake.  The 3rd and 4th sets were great tennis & the 5th, unfortunately for Monfils, showed the difference between them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You should have stayed awake.  The 3rd and 4th sets were great tennis & the 5th, unfortunately for Monfils, showed the difference between them.

The irony here is that Monfils needs to age (not to mature; just to c-a-l-m ... d-o-w-n at times), but once he does, his body will betray him.

When Federer went up 2-0 in the first set, I thought (everybody thought) it was going to be a quick match. But then Monfils somehow was able to break back and win the first two sets, all while looking like he was losing. He was spectacular at times (did you see that baseline volley he hit for a winner down by his ankles?), but he was winning in an "Ivanisevic-type" way.

I'm reminded of something my piano teacher once told me: "You could probably play the first measure of any piece ever written. So what?"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No comments on the way the US Open folks handled the Peng injury?  I've never seen anything quite like it & the "explanations" clearly showed that they had no idea what to do.  After hearing, before this match, so much about the "rules" concerning bringing trainers out, getting medical time-outs, etc it was surreal to watch them contradict every previous statement.  As much as it would've been heartbreaking (& been criticized), they should have ended the match when Peng was initially unable to continue within the established time for return of serve.  Or, if they wanted to go thru the motions, they could've had W. serve out the game, most likely without Peng's participation, then allow the legit. time until Peng had to serve, then give points when she couldn't until the game (and, therefore, the match) was over.

Imagine if Peng had come back on the court those 15-20 minutes later, after the medical "evaluation" (it was treatment), with no penalty points given, and played well enough to continue.  Imagine if Wozniacki lost the game.  How about maybe then the set.  I'd almost guess that the results would've had to be overturned later on.  As it is, I can foresee a flurry of similar situations coming up if they don't clarify quickly and admit a mistake.  I know its jaded of me, but there are more than a couple of players who would take advantage of a hole in the rules this big.

And imagine if, after being medically seen ("evaluated" or treated) off the court, she would've come back and had a stroke (or worse).  I haven't heard anything about her condition today and I really hope she's okay and will recover.  No thanks to the Open or, possibly more importantly, her coach, who should've come out and thrown in the towel for her.  If she doesn't fire him (if she can, that is), she's a fool.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No comments on the way the US Open folks handled the Peng injury?  I've never seen anything quite like it & the "explanations" clearly showed that they had no idea what to do.  After hearing, before this match, so much about the "rules" concerning bringing trainers out, getting medical time-outs, etc it was surreal to watch them contradict every previous statement.  As much as it would've been heartbreaking (& been criticized), they should have ended the match when Peng was initially unable to continue within the established time for return of serve.  Or, if they wanted to go thru the motions, they could've had W. serve out the game, most likely without Peng's participation, then allow the legit. time until Peng had to serve, then give points when she couldn't until the game (and, therefore, the match) was over.

Imagine if Peng had come back on the court those 15-20 minutes later, after the medical "evaluation" (it was treatment), with no penalty points given, and played well enough to continue.  Imagine if Wozniacki lost the game.  How about maybe then the set.  I'd almost guess that the results would've had to be overturned later on.  As it is, I can foresee a flurry of similar situations coming up if they don't clarify quickly and admit a mistake.  I know its jaded of me, but there are more than a couple of players who would take advantage of a hole in the rules this big.

And imagine if, after being medically seen ("evaluated" or treated) off the court, she would've come back and had a stroke (or worse).  I haven't heard anything about her condition today and I really hope she's okay and will recover.  No thanks to the Open or, possibly more importantly, her coach, who should've come out and thrown in the towel for her.  If she doesn't fire him (if she can, that is), she's a fool.

I have searched for video of the entire sequence of events, and have been unable to find one - do you have a link?

All I've seen are pictures of Peng Shuai during her episode, and it's pretty obvious that she was having severe muscle cramps that weren't going away. She was in genuine agony, and not many other conditions can bring someone to tears like that - she had a ten-minute medical evaluation, so I assume they satisfied themselves that it was "merely" muscle cramps brought on by dehydration.

Steve, I'm not sure which portion of the aftermath you're objecting to, so I'll just offer up a general opinion. Fitness - which includes the body's ability to stay hydrated and ward off muscle cramps - is part of the game, and if a player becomes unable to "answer the bell," then the penalty system must be invoked, whether that means taking off points, games, or ending the match altogether. I don't think there's a pro on tour, including Peng, who would disagree with that. Two related exceptions in other sports that come to mind are Oscar Pistorius (who, next week, is going to receive some really bad news) and Casey Martin (I know it sounds harsh, but I don't think Martin should have been allowed to use a cart - in fact, I think that was such a no-brainer that I lost respect for the game of golf when they made an exception for him.)

Until I see this specific situation in its entirety, I can't really chime in, other than speaking in obvious generalities. So, what exactly do you think tournament officials did wrong?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Perhaps he'll face Nishikori?

You were saying?!?!?

The first male from Asia ever to play in a Grand Slam final, and he has a legitimate chance to win! This championship between two first-time Grand Slam finalists is tailor made for tennis connoisseurs (and also tailor made for angry sponsors) - what do you think the Vegas odds were against this happening?

With Stanislas Wawrinka winning the Australian Open in January, we have two first-time Grand Slam champions for the first time since 2003 (Juan Carlos Ferrera won the French Open and Andy Roddick won the U.S. Open that year). Even more remarkable, this is the first time we've had a Grand Slam final without either Federer, Djokovic, or Nadal in it since the Australian Open in 2005 (*). Think about that: ten years of Grand Slams - this tournament is historic for breaking that incredible streak (people in the future won't remember the tournament; they'll remember the streak).

This might (repeat: *might*) be remembered as the year in which the Holy Trinity released their vice grip (as good as Andy Murray is, I never thought he quite belonged with this trio).

(*) This link shows all the Grand Slam champions: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Grand_Slam_men's_singles_champions

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have searched for video of the entire sequence of events, and have been unable to find one - do you have a link?

All I've seen are pictures of Peng Shuai during her episode, and it's pretty obvious that she was having severe muscle cramps that weren't going away. She was in genuine agony, and not many other conditions can bring someone to tears like that - she had a ten-minute medical evaluation, so I assume they satisfied themselves that it was "merely" muscle cramps brought on by dehydration.

Steve, I'm not sure which portion of the aftermath you're objecting to, so I'll just offer up a general opinion. Fitness - which includes the body's ability to stay hydrated and ward off muscle cramps - is part of the game, and if a player becomes unable to "answer the bell," then the penalty system must be invoked, whether that means taking off points, games, or ending the match altogether. I don't think there's a pro on tour, including Peng, who would disagree with that. Two related exceptions in other sports that come to mind are Oscar Pistorius (who, next week, is going to receive some really bad news) and Casey Martin (I know it sounds harsh, but I don't think Martin should have been allowed to use a cart - in fact, I think that was such a no-brainer that I lost respect for the game of golf when they made an exception for him.)

Until I see this specific situation in its entirety, I can't really chime in, other than speaking in obvious generalities. So, what exactly do you think tournament officials did wrong?

I don't have a link.... definitely take the time to find one, you'll appreciate it. We're in agreement on the general context (I bolded that part of your post above)

Initially, Peng collapsed in pain during a game, after being in less acute distress for awhile. Bent over, unable to stand, let alone play points. Trainers, medical personnel, officials... all made it over to her on the back line & this continued for 10 minutes or more. Then they took her off for "evaluation" for another 15 minutes or more. Then she returned and play resumed without a single penalty point being applied, let alone a game. Wozniacki, who had just been standing around for the 20 minutes, waiting for some word, then was told to continue her service game from where it left off, served & I believe Peng won a point or two of the 4-6 played before she collapsed again, writhing in pain and eventually taken off in a wheelchair. Weird & totally unacceptable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll note that the Bryan brothers make an annual appearance in DC every August at the Citi Open (when I last saw them, it was the Legg Mason Tennis Classic).  Doubles tennis is very entertaining.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Cilic-Nishikori match is being broadcast live on espn.go.com as of 5 PM - click on CourtCast Live.

THAT was anti-climactic, wasn't' it? I am quite the sports prognosticator-- called the Nishikori longshot, and scored a whopping 134 point in fantasy football last night!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...