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All-Clad Cookware - Bonded Cookware Using American Metals Produced by All-Clad Metalcrafters (1971) in Canonsburg, PA

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About 15 years ago, we lucked out in an eBay thing and came in second place to buy an All-Clad (MasterChef pre the show, wonder what the trademark BS must be) set. These are probably the best pans I have worked with.

Any tips on finding more at a reasonable price? Not loving the idea of paying $200-$400 per pot that I want to get.

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All-Clad seconds online

Another option is to go to the Leesburg Outlet Mall when the Williams-Sonoma Outlet is having a sale. Sometimes it's 40% off their already discounted prices. I've gotten pieces of All-Clad for amazingly low prices compared to the regular retail--they may be seconds, but it's unlikely that you can actually find the flaws. Often it's just a tiny scratch, nothing that affects the use of the thing. Get on their email list and they'll notify you when they are having a sale.

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On 2/27/2015 at 11:15 AM, zoramargolis said:

All-Clad seconds online

Another option is to go to the Leesburg Outlet Mall when the Williams-Sonoma Outlet is having a sale. Sometimes it's 40% off their already discounted prices. I've gotten pieces of All-Clad for amazingly low prices compared to the regular retail--they may be seconds, but it's unlikely that you can actually find the flaws. Often it's just a tiny scratch, nothing that affects the use of the thing. Get on their email list and they'll notify you when they are having a sale.

Thanks for the suggestions! I signed up for the email list. The provided link does not currently show what I am really looking for (larger pots, the kind you would get and use to say, make a pot of pasta, or chili, or soup).  I'll keep looking!

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On 2/27/2015 at 10:02 PM, Pool Boy said:

About 15 years ago, we lucked out in an eBay thing and came in second place to buy an All-Clad (MasterChef pre the show, wonder what the trademark BS must be) set. These are probably the best pans I have worked with.

Any tips on finding more at a reasonable price? Not loving the idea of paying $200-$400 per pot that I want to get.

May be too late and not better priced than the options above but this sale was just announced via email at Sur la Table.

 

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Thanks for the link. I am actually looking for an 8 quart stock pot. Best price I have found so far is $260. <sigh>

31NZ1ARMSAL._SX300_.jpg

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On 3/4/2015 at 9:40 PM, Pool Boy said:

Thanks for the link. I am actually looking for an 8 quart stock pot. Best price I have found so far is $260. <sigh>

Why do you need something as heavy and expensive as All Clad for a stock pot? Their stuff is awfully nice, but something sturdy and relatively cheap like Revere Ware with plain stainless steel sides and a thick aluminum disk bottom is perfectly serviceable for stock and boiling pasta and the like. Is it just a matter of wanting to pamper yourself? If so, save the money you would have spent on an All Clad stock pot and spend it on really luxurious bed-sheets, is my advice.

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On 3/4/2015 at 10:50 PM, The Hersch said:

Why do you need something as heavy and expensive as All Clad for a stock pot? Their stuff is awfully nice, but something sturdy and relatively cheap like Revereware with plain stainless steel sides and a thick aluminum disk bottom is perfectly serviceable for stock and boiling pasta and the like. Is it just a matter of wanting to pamper yourself? If so, save the money you would have spent on an All Clad stock pot and spend it on really luxurious bed-sheets, is my advice.

I am sure I could get something OK for less. I replaced some pots I used to have that I think were all thick aluminum, but they had a non-stick coating in them for some dumb reason. They got scratched and I did not want to use them anymore. I replaced them with what I thought were good Cuisinart pots, with a decent aluminum core ('...Aluminum inner core for fast, even heating...'), but they suck at heating up a pot of water, for pasta (just one example). So, I would rather invest in a pot I will never, ever have to replace, that will perform far better, than buy another pot I will be disappointed with and have to replace again.

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On 3/4/2015 at 2:51 PM, Pool Boy said:

So, I would rather invest in a pot I will never, ever have to replace, that will perform far better, than buy another pot I will be disappointed with and have to replace again.

Unless, of course, you leave your anodized All Clad pasta cooker on high heat all night long. :( 

(Truth is, though, I still use it.)

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On 3/4/2015 at 2:51 PM, Pool Boy said:

I am sure I could get something OK for less. I replaced some pots I used to have that I think were all thick aluminum, but they had a non-stick coating in them for some dumb reason. They got scratched and I did not want to use them anymore. I replaced them with what I thought were good Cuisinart pots, with a decent aluminum core ('...Aluminum inner core for fast, even heating...'), but they suck at heating up a pot of water, for pasta (just one example). So, I would rather invest in a pot I will never, ever have to replace, that will perform far better, than buy another pot I will be disappointed with and have to replace again.

Shouldn't have to defend kitchen supply choices but, as defenses go, that's a pretty good one.  Thumbs up here.  :)

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On 3/5/2015 at 7:10 PM, darkstar965 said:

Shouldn't have to defend kitchen supply choices but, as defenses go, that's a pretty good one.  Thumbs up here.  :)

+600. After having a cheaper Revereware stockpot and waiting forever for it to heat up, I went to the 8 quart All Clad and have been happy ever since. I would highly recommend, although I would avoid the "ltd" line if you ever envision using induction in your kitchen as they are incompatible...

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I have two stainless steel stockpots--one large (3 gallon) and the other larger, probably holds 4 gallons. They have heavy bottoms and glass lids. Well, they did both have glass lids. The lid for the smaller of the two shattered and ruined a pot of chickenstock a long time ago. But my larger All-Clad lids fit perfectly, so not a problem. I bought pasta inserts for both of them, and I use the larger one for waterbath canning. I bought them at Tuesday Morning, for an amount I don't recall, but it was well under $100 each. I don't know the brand or where they were made, but they work really well. I make stock, obviously. And cook pasta. I use them to make big batches of bbq sauce and have no problems with scorching.

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+600. After having a cheaper Revereware stockpot and waiting forever for it to heat up, I went to the 8 quart All Clad and have been happy ever since. I would highly recommend, although I would avoid the "ltd" line if you ever envision using induction in your kitchen as they are incompatible...

Appreciate that, Keith. :-)

In full disclosure, we have this pot as well. I had to check the bottom to be sure it was the same, ours is maybe ten years old and is stamped "All Clad Master Chef 508" on the bottom. We've used it many more times than I can count. Their stuff is very well made. We use it almost exclusively for pasta since it conducts heat so well and is perfectly sized for a pound. Absolutely no regrets. Cleans up nicely and still looks great. No doubt it'll last another ten years if not many more. Big recommend.

We also have a bigger All Clad stock pot that came with a pasta insert and a more shallow insert for steaming. We don't use this one as often but kind of think of it as the lobster pot. I'm not certain but think we got that one at an outlet or on sale somewhere.

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Huh.....I am curious about the use of pasta inserts. I really see no need for what I perceive to be a unitasker (a colander of course is sort of a unitasker, but I use it for at least a few things in my kitchen so for me that doesn't count).

But thanks for the notes on the all clad 8 quart. Still trying to find it for under $200, but I think I will be waiting a long time or just get dumb lucky.

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On 3/5/2015 at 9:40 PM, Pool Boy said:

Huh.....I am curious about the use of pasta inserts. I really see no need for what I perceive to be a unitasker (a colander of course is sort of a unitasker, but I use it for at least a few things in my kitchen so for me that doesn't count).

the pasta insert is not a unitasker. I use it as a steamer when I make tamales, or cabbage, or large batches of cauliflower. It also is useful when making stock. Put the bones and vegetables in the insert, fill the pot with water, and then when it is done cooking, you can remove the solids by lifting out the insert. Then, all you need to do is strain.

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On 3/4/2015 at 2:51 PM, Pool Boy said:

I would rather invest in a pot I will never, ever have to replace, that will perform far better, than buy another pot I will be disappointed with and have to replace again.

I replaced my Reverware with All-Clad (just the basic line) in the winter of 1998.  Granted I'm fanatical about treating them right (they never go into the dishwasher), but still they perform flawlessly, as well as they did 17 years ago, and I don't expect I will ever need to replace them.  I use the 8 qt pot several times a week, for pasta, blanching vegetables, stocks, soups, stews, braises that start on the stove and finish in the oven, just about anything I make in quantity...  it may be an indulgence but you can't go wrong.

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I replaced my Reverware with All-Clad (just the basic line) in the winter of 1998.  Granted I'm fanatical about treating them right (they never go into the dishwasher), but still they perform flawlessly, as good as they did 17 years ago, and I don't expect I will ever need to replace them.  I use the 8 qt pot several times a week, for pasta, blanching vegetables, stocks, soups, stews, braises that start on the stove and finish in the oven, just about anything I make in quantity...  it may be an indulgence but you can't go wrong.

Dishwasher?! We never put pots or skillets of any kind in the dishwasher. Besides better cleaning and protecting them by hand, they'd take up too much room so more efficient running the dishwasher with all the dishes, glasses and smaller things. Now you have me wondering if that's an odd practice?

Interesting also how you use this pot. We use it a ton also but mostly for pasta, blanching and things that require boiling water or very thin liquids. For "soups, stews, braises", whether or not they go stove to oven, we use dutch ovens and other enameled iron. Have always thought they brown better and conduct heat a bit more slowly but more sustainably and consistently once the temperature is reached.

I'm interested now to know how others here use their pots and pans.

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On 3/6/2015 at 11:36 PM, zoramargolis said:

the pasta insert is not a unitasker. I use it as a steamer when I make tamales, or cabbage, or large batches of cauliflower. It also is useful when making stock. Put the bones and vegetables in the insert, fill the pot with water, and then when it is done cooking, you can remove the solids by lifting out the insert. Then, all you need to do is strain.

Steaming - very cool. As for the lifting the insert, I have seen some in action before (probably far cheaper types) and they are not exactly easy to use without making a mess. Ah well, we all have our preferences in the kitchen.

On 3/6/2015 at 8:20 AM, porcupine said:

I replaced my Reverware with All-Clad (just the basic line) in the winter of 1998.  Granted I'm fanatical about treating them right (they never go into the dishwasher), but still they perform flawlessly, as good as they did 17 years ago, and I don't expect I will ever need to replace them.  I use the 8 qt pot several times a week, for pasta, blanching vegetables, stocks, soups, stews, braises that start on the stove and finish in the oven, just about anything I make in quantity...  it may be an indulgence but you can't go wrong.

Based on my own experiences thus far with the all-clad I already have, I have to agree.

On 3/6/2015 at 0:21 PM, darkstar965 said:

Dishwasher?! We never put pots or skillets of any kind in the dishwasher. Besides better cleaning and protecting them by hand, they'd take up too much room so more efficient running the dishwasher with all the dishes, glasses and smaller things. Now you have me wondering if that's an odd practice?

Interesting also how you use this pot. We use it a ton also but mostly for pasta, blanching and things that require boiling water or very thin liquids. For "soups, stews, braises", whether or not they go stove to oven, we use dutch ovens and other enameled iron. Have always thought they brown better and conduct heat a bit more slowly but more sustainably and consistently once the temperature is reached.

I'm interested now to know how others here use their pots and pans.

No pots or pans go in the dishwasher here either. All hand washed.  As for the soups/stews/braises use of thinks other than a large stockpot, I generally agree, but it really depends on the thing I am making and also if it is a single, double or quadruple batch. Braises always happen in enameled cast iron dutch ovens, but I often do soups, stews and chilis in decent stockpots.

On 3/6/2015 at 11:36 PM, zoramargolis said:

the pasta insert is not a unitasker. I use it as a steamer when I make tamales, or cabbage, or large batches of cauliflower. It also is useful when making stock. Put the bones and vegetables in the insert, fill the pot with water, and then when it is done cooking, you can remove the solids by lifting out the insert. Then, all you need to do is strain.

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On 3/6/2015 at 8:20 AM, porcupine said:

I replaced my Reverware with All-Clad (just the basic line) in the winter of 1998.  Granted I'm fanatical about treating them right (they never go into the dishwasher), but still they perform flawlessly, as good as they did 17 years ago, and I don't expect I will ever need to replace them.  I use the 8 qt pot several times a week, for pasta, blanching vegetables, stocks, soups, stews, braises that start on the stove and finish in the oven, just about anything I make in quantity...  it may be an indulgence but you can't go wrong.

Ditto, word-for-word.  (Although, I may have bought my All-Clad pots and pans in 1997.)  At the time they seemed very expensive.  When I think of the many years of service, multiple times every week that almost every piece delivers, it's probably been the best investment I've ever made.

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Over the years I have come to understand that my friends consider me eccentric for not putting pots and pans in the dishwasher.  I stubbornly cling to my ways despite their jests, and am somewhat relieved to read that I am not alone.

I own one small enameled cast-iron pan.  It's nice, but I've never bought more because the All-Clad works just fine.

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My husband does the dishes (most of them).  Unless I protest strongly, it goes into the dishwasher.  There's a limit to how many items I can complain about going in (though good knives never do).

This discussion got me going on replacing my pasta pot.  I have one that's so ancient it doesn't even sit evenly on the burner.  It's a bit wobbly.  The pot was my mother's and has to be 50 years old. Sur La Table currently has 6-qt pasta pots with inserts for $99 something.  That's what I got.  I am going to insist on it not going into the dishwasher.

I have a much larger stock/lobster pot that we usually keep stored way up high away and a Farberware pot that's probably also 6 qts.

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On 3/6/2015 at 6:50 PM, porcupine said:

Over the years I have come to understand that my friends consider me eccentric for not putting pots and pans in the dishwasher.  I stubbornly cling to my ways despite their jests, and am somewhat relieved to read that I am not alone.

I own one small enameled cast-iron pan.  It's nice, but I've never bought more because the All-Clad works just fine.

Maybe some of those friends are the "eccentric" ones. Bet they always run their cars through automated brush washes also. :-)

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On 3/7/2015 at 9:20 PM, darkstar965 said:

Maybe some of those friends are the "eccentric" ones. Bet they always run their cars through automated brush washes also. :-)

GAH! Why would anyone do that!????!

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I have some All Clad and I've always been struck by how poorly designed the handles are on the saute and sauce pans. It's too easy for the pan twist in your hand and tip down to the right or left because the handle isn't ergonomic-- too narrow and oddly shaped. I love them otherwise, but I wish the vandals would take the handles (thanks Bob).

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On 3/5/2015 at 8:53 PM, darkstar965 said:

We also have a bigger All Clad stock pot that came with a pasta insert and a more shallow insert for steaming. We don't use this one as often but kind of think of it as the lobster pot. I'm not certain but think we got that one at an outlet or on sale somewhere.

I got this 12 quart All-Clad multicooker 10 years ago, and it is the most used cookware in our kitchen.  Pasta, steaming dumplings on two levels, soups, etc.

all-clad-perforated-multipot-with-steame

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I have some All Clad and I've always been struck by how poorly designed the handles are on the saute and sauce pans. It's too easy for the pan twist in your hand and tip down to the right or left because the handle isn't ergonomic-- too narrow and oddly shaped. I love them otherwise, but I wish the vandals would take the handles (thanks Bob).

Did you forget to take the protective wrappers off the handles? Cooking under the influence maybe? :-)

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