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All-Clad Cookware - Bonded Cookware Using American Metals Produced by All-Clad Metalcrafters (1971) in Canonsburg, PA

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21 hours ago, ol_ironstomach said:

Millville

If for some reason you find yourself passing through the Vineland/Millville area, I should point out that Groupe SEB runs their North American distribution operation out of a nondescript industrial park on the south side of Millville, including a "small" (read: not too small) factory outlet store in the first building inside their gate.  The store is open to the public, but only operates Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays.

Map location: 2121 Eden Rd, Millville

SEB is the French conglomerate that owns Airbake, Krups, Mirro, Regal, Rowenta, T-Fal, Wearever...and All-Clad.  For what it's worth, I was also told that the items that go on sale at All-Clad's periodic seconds sale at the Canonsburg factory are first selected from the inventory in Millville, and that the better pieces tend to stay there too.  All I can say is that the selection was vastly better than what I've seen at the William-Sonoma outlet, and that there were a fair number of marked down first-quality items as well.  The deepest discounts were three tables of items marked 70% off.  I ended up picking up a couple of half-priced appliances and a few additions to our household All-Clad hoard.

Arc International also has their big US glass factory and distribution center in the same part of town, but not apparently a factory store.  Pity.

Are you as happy with your All-Clad as I am with mine? I don't use it much, but I've never had *any* problems with anything I've ever bought from them other than two, both of which were self-inflicted:

* I bought the "LTD" line (the anodized kind with the black exterior), and the black exterior faded from dishwasher use. This is more of a cautionary tale than any sort of complaint, because when I bought it, the directions specifically said it's *not* dishwasher-tolerant.

* My pasta boiler was left on high-heat *overnight*. I suppose the water finished evaporating at around 12:30 AM, and when I found it 8 hours later, the bottom of the pot had buckled from the heat (literally bubbled upward - you couldn't flatten it back down even with a hammer). The exterior is perfectly normal; it's only the interior that bubbled, and I still use this pot to this very day, about ten years after the incident happened. Maybe I'm being slowly poisoned, but it works just as good as new - the only damage, assuming no toxic leakage (sorry, I'm reading a book about Chernobyl), is cosmetic. Remarkable!

Aside from your opinions on performance, does anyone know if All-Clad is still the same, quality-wise, as it was 20 years ago? Because I really can't imagine better home cookware than this, not that I'm very knowledgeable about home cookware. Is it just as heavy as it used to be? I *love* the feel of a good, heavy piece of cookware - the kind you can kill an intruder with (and I'm talking about party guests who come into your kitchen while you're trying to finish the risotto).

On 3/5/2015 at 7:10 PM, darkstar965 said:

Shouldn't have to defend kitchen supply choices but, as defenses go, that's a pretty good one.  Thumbs up here.  :)

On 3/5/2015 at 8:09 PM, Keithstg said:

+600. After having a cheaper Revereware stockpot and waiting forever for it to heat up, I went to the 8 quart All Clad and have been happy ever since. I would highly recommend, although I would avoid the "ltd" line if you ever envision using induction in your kitchen as they are incompatible...

If someone has already made up their mind on a specific type of stock pot, automobile, or flannel shirt, I say, "Go for it." If I were buying additional cookware, based on my own limited (or should I say, LTD) experience, I'd head straight for All-Clad unless I discover an iron-clad :) reason not to - that's why I asked if people are still happy with theirs. That said, I probably wouldn't get the LTD again just because I *am* a dishwasher maggot.

I haven't thought about this in a *long* time, but is everything by All-Clad forged? It seems to be in the exact same condition as it was when I bought it, and I can honestly envision a piece of their cookware lasting 100 years. So many things in this world - both products and people - are nothing but hyped-up names that are hollow in the middle; All-Clad is the real deal.

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Our All-clad pans are going strong still after many years of use where others have fallen apart and needed to be replaced. They are quite heavy to hold but not as bad as Le Creusets. I would like something which is lighter but those don't tend to make it for years of usage. 

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I have some All Clad stainless pans that are still great after almost 20 years.  (I took a seasonal job at Crate & Barrel to get an employee discount. Had to quit when I spent more than I made....)

I have added more pans since then and you can tell the difference. Some newer pans and most utensils are made in China and finished in PA.  It's interesting to see how the logo has gotten more prominent over the years.

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10 hours ago, DonRocks said:

Are you as happy with your All-Clad as I am with mine? I don't use it much, but I've never had *any* problems with anything I've ever bought from them other than two, both of which were self-inflicted:

Unequivocally, yes.  It's just expensive.  I expect the lines clad with two stainless layers to outlive me by a long shot.  On first principles, cookware with a thicker aluminum or copper layer (e.g. Calphalon, Mauviel, etc) should distribute heat even more evenly, but stainless steel is so much easier to care for that it's no contest.  I retired my Calphalon ages ago.  Our copper pots are mostly wall hangers now (except for the egg whisking bowl and mousse molds).

10 hours ago, DonRocks said:

Aside from your opinions on performance, does anyone know if All-Clad is still the same, quality-wise, as it was 20 years ago? Because I really can't imagine better home cookware than this, not that I'm very knowledgeable about home cookware. Is it just as heavy as it used to be?

Quality seems exactly the same to me.  Their inspectors are so picky, that I have a couple of recent seconds where I have yet to identify the defect.  After years of no apparent change, they did make some minor improvements lately.  The newest lines are now etched on the base with their logo and the nominal capacity of the pot.  Their new handle casting has gained an ergonomic finger ledge on the underside, and the helper loops are slightly larger.

10 hours ago, DonRocks said:

If someone has already made up their mind on a specific type of stock pot, automobile, or flannel shirt, I say, "Go for it." If I were buying additional cookware, based on my own limited (or should I say, LTD) experience, I'd head straight for All-Clad unless I discover an iron-clad :) reason not to - that's why I asked if people are still happy with theirs. That said, I probably wouldn't get the LTD again just because I *am* a dishwasher maggot.

I haven't thought about this in a *long* time, but is everything by All-Clad forged? It seems to be in the exact same condition as it was when I bought it, and I can honestly envision a piece of their cookware lasting 100 years. So many things in this world - both products and people - are nothing but hyped-up names that are hollow in the middle; All-Clad is the real deal.

Although all aluminum-core All-Clad exposes a small amount of aluminum at the cut edge of the pot, the LTD and LTD2 lines expose an entire aluminum exterior, which is why they're not dishwasher-safe.  Too much reactive surface area.  Ditto the copper lines.

Forged?  No, the pots are not forged.  All-Clad was based on the founder's patent for roll-bonded metal laminates, which completely obviates the need for forge-welding dissimilar metals, and their steel layers are supplied to them already rolled and homogeneous.  Technically, the pots are stamped.

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On 4/27/2016 at 7:21 AM, DC Deb said:

I have added more pans since then and you can tell the difference. Some newer pans and most utensils are made in China and finished in PA.  It's interesting to see how the logo has gotten more prominent over the years.

From their website:

"The innovative, high-performance bonded cookware that All-Clad is known for is handcrafted in the USA by American artisans using American steel. Non-bonded cookware, electrics and accessories originate elsewhere." 

On 4/27/2016 at 9:10 AM, ol_ironstomach said:

Forged?  No, the pots are not forged.  All-Clad was based on the founder's patent for roll-bonded metal laminates, which completely obviates the need for forge-welding dissimilar metals, and their steel layers are supplied to them already rolled and homogeneous.  Technically, the pots are stamped.

Is there an explanation of this anywhere, preferably with visuals? I can't picture it (are the metals stamped while in a malleable (fluid) state, presumably while still being hot?) 

There used to be an interesting exhibit on the ground floor of the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History - right by one of the portals - showing the effects of various stressors on materials (tensile (pulling) forces, compressive (pushing) forces, torsion (twisting), etc.) - the exhibit isn't modern at all, but it's very interesting, and viewable in just a few minutes. You'll see it on the ground floor, center area - just look around for the buckled piece of metal.

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I still have not pulled the trigger on another 8 quart (or larger) stock pot from All-Clad. I will probably do so later this year in the fall. I may also replace a few smaller sauce pans at the same time. What I have discovered is that I rarely use the Cuisinart stock pots anymore. I mainly use them when I have a lot of pots in the over, on the cooktop because of a big or complicated meal I am preparing. But for day in and day out use and access, I always, always go for any clean and available All-Clad that I have in my repertoire. I am actually annoyed with myself for not going the extra $$$ to get the all clad roasting pan. The one I have is fine, but I really do not like its performance on the cooktop for wen I am making a gravy in the pan after coming out of the wall oven. Ah well. If I ever upgrade things, I always have nieces and nephews to help out getting set up in their own places as they do that.

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So where is the best place to buy these things nowadays?  Are the Leesburg outlets still the best bet?

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I love my All-Clad and I've been using them for almost 20 years.  You can beat the crap out of them and they keep on ticking.  I've used their pans on gas and electric stove tops, on open fire (fire pit) and a gas bbq/grill. 

The Williams & Sonoma at Leesburg Outlet sometimes has good deals (not as good as they use to, they use to sell All-Clad that might have one scratch on it for deep discounts).  TJ Maxx or Marshalls usually have mix and match pieces for decent prices, but depends on what they have in stock. 

 

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Thanks Tweaked!  

For some reason, when I asked my question I thought this thread started in 2013 not 2015 so I was looking for an update.  D'oh!

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If you're looking for a rare opportunity to buy All-Clad at a 20% discount, today (30 April) is their event supporting https://www.nokidhungry.org/. Donate $25 and receive 20% off everything in the store, without exclusion.

As I mentioned in the Events forum, Bryan Voltaggio is appearing at the Tysons Galleria store from 12-2 in support of this event.

(My wife works for WS, and I'm mentioning this only to support the event)

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On 4/27/2016 at 11:20 AM, Bart said:

So where is the best place to buy these things nowadays?  Are the Leesburg outlets still the best bet?

It can't hurt to use Amazon as a baseline, and call over to Leesburg - that will take a total of five minutes.

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On ‎3‎/‎6‎/‎2015 at 5:20 AM, porcupine said:

I replaced my Reverware with All-Clad (just the basic line) in the winter of 1998.  Granted I'm fanatical about treating them right (they never go into the dishwasher), but still they perform flawlessly, as well as they did 17 years ago, and I don't expect I will ever need to replace them.  I use the 8 qt pot several times a week, for pasta, blanching vegetables, stocks, soups, stews, braises that start on the stove and finish in the oven, just about anything I make in quantity...  it may be an indulgence but you can't go wrong.

I've been using All-Clad since 1978, when I purchased a 4-quart and 2-quart saucepan and a 3-quart sauté pan.  They were all MasterChef models, and after 38 years they are still doing service in my kitchen.  Over the years I purchased some skillets, most recently the new MasterChef (MC2) 12-inch skillet, which has a nice, thick aluminum core and outer layer because I wanted the extra thickness for more even heating. 

I've also got a couple of the newer D5 pans, one of which is a 1½ quart saucepan which is used several times a day and lives on my stove top.  The other is a D5 8-quart soup pot which I picked up at Williams-Sonoma for $200 when it was on sale about a year ago.  This is a great pot, and it does double duty as a Dutch oven.  I highly recommend the D5 line and the new MC2 pots ... mine have been excellent in all circumstances.

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On 4/26/2016 at 9:14 AM, DonRocks said:

From their website:

"The innovative, high-performance bonded cookware that All-Clad is known for is handcrafted in the USA by American artisans using American steel. Non-bonded cookware, electrics and accessories originate elsewhere." 

Is there an explanation of this anywhere, preferably with visuals? I can't picture it (are the metals stamped while in a malleable (fluid) state, presumably while still being hot?) 

https://youtu.be/i1Ju63S4JfI

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I bought my first piece of All-Clad over the holidays (stainless pan w/lid) and I often wonder why I took so long. It's fantastic.

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So I'm lazy and pretty much have always cooked with at least some non-stick assistance in my pots and pans. I'm getting skeeved out by our burn rate through cheap non-stick pans, though, and am thinking of going big and getting the All-Clad 12-inch stainless frying pan, but am worried about learning to cooking on stainless (the sticking!!). Any tips, tricks, testimonials, or literature I should check out before taking the leap? Should I do it? What say ye?

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3 hours ago, Sundae in the Park said:

So I'm lazy and pretty much have always cooked with at least some non-stick assistance in my pots and pans. I'm getting skeeved out by our burn rate through cheap non-stick pans, though, and am thinking of going big and getting the All-Clad 12-inch stainless frying pan, but am worried about learning to cooking on stainless (the sticking!!). Any tips, tricks, testimonials, or literature I should check out before taking the leap? Should I do it? What say ye?

We use ours every day.  A little butter or oil prevents major sticking.  If you don't leave it out all night and wash it before you go to bed you should not have a problem.  Never had a mess a Scotch-Brite sponge couldn't handle.  I don't recall ever having to use Brillo or SOS on this (not sure that would be good for the pan).

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6 hours ago, dcs said:

We use ours every day.  A little butter or oil prevents major sticking.  If you don't leave it out all night and wash it before you go to bed you should not have a problem.  Never had a mess a Scotch-Brite sponge couldn't handle.  I don't recall ever having to use Brillo or SOS on this (not sure that would be good for the pan).

I've been using a Scotch-Brite pad with Bon Ami on my All-Clad when required; I've had the pans for over 20 years. Absolutely no damage to them whatsoever. I expect that they will last the rest of my life. 

Sundae, you might be pleasantly surprised by the quality of browning; I wouldn't worry about burning. It happens sometimes, of course, but a good overnight soak followed by the above treatment has always worked. 

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I love all-clad. We have their (now-defunct?) masterchef series that we got on the cheap on Ebay almost 20 years ago. Sticking is still a possibility and you need to manage. I've used brillo pads on mine to no ill effects believe it or not. Anyway, I still keep a higher end non-stick pan on hand for a handful of pain in the ass situations (as in, fish skin) you do not want to screw around with sticking.

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On 11/20/2018 at 10:18 PM, Sundae in the Park said:

So I'm lazy and pretty much have always cooked with at least some non-stick assistance in my pots and pans. I'm getting skeeved out by our burn rate through cheap non-stick pans, though, and am thinking of going big and getting the All-Clad 12-inch stainless frying pan, but am worried about learning to cooking on stainless (the sticking!!). Any tips, tricks, testimonials, or literature I should check out before taking the leap? Should I do it? What say ye?

I got it! It's sooooooo shiny. Can't wait to try it out.

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On 12/28/2018 at 2:04 PM, Sundae in the Park said:

Sure, this story on the Bar Keeper's Friend website is a promotional entry, but it is still hilarious/awesome and that is the same pan I just bought, looking so very shiny and new after a good scrub! So...I think I'll be getting some. Well played.

Hahahhahhaha, I applaud Sandy, and I do love me some Bar Keeper's Friend, it is a staple in my pantry.

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14 hours ago, ktmoomau said:

 I do love me some Bar Keeper's Friend, it is a staple in my pantry.

Do you use the powder or liquid?  I have never tried this product and was thinking of getting some.

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7 hours ago, dcs said:

Do you use the powder or liquid?  I have never tried this product and was thinking of getting some.

I have had both, but I prefer the powder for dishes, sinks, bathtub, etc.  It is like a more mild chemical version of Comet that you can use in more places- if you look up the cleaning uses online there are a lot, some I haven't tried.  The liquid can be handy in the bathroom and shower, and on SS and silver, but honestly, I think the real cleaning power is the powder and would get that one, you can use it in many of the same places and I think the powder just cleans a bit better, it's just sometimes can be a little harder to apply to things like the fridge than a squirt of liquid stuff.  But I actually got a reusable cloth set that cleans the appliances really well using just water, and when they get dirty you can wash them, so I have been using those for the fronts of the appliances.  

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I lost custody of my All Clad pots and pans in the divorce.   :(   They were wedding gifts.

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8 hours ago, Al Dente said:

I lost custody of my All Clad pots and pans in the divorce.   :(   They were wedding gifts.

It happens... replacing them is cheaper than fighting over them!  Makes you wish you found one on the street in a trash bin that just needed cleaned!

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