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Morcilla - Spanish Blood Sausage with Many Regional Variations


Rhone1998
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Straw, Stick, and Brick doesn't have it, but I talked to the owner there this morning, and she recommended the place In Bethesda as well for Spanish style morcilla, and also told me about a place on Georgia Avenue right near the Silver Spring line called La Fonda Paisa, which she says carries Colombian style Morcilla. Since that one is closer to me, I'm going to give the Colombian style a shot, and see how it goes in my fabada.

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Alas, despite what the lady who answered the phone told me this morning, when I arrived at the store they didn't actually have any morcilla. 
So to anyone inspired by this thread who was going to go there today, a word of warning. They're supposedly getting a shipment on Tuesday.

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Can anyone expound on the distinctions between morcilla and other types of blood sausages? Other than being Spanish, what makes morcilla, morcilla? I'm guessing each country (and surely each region within a country) adds their own variations of filler - for example, Wikipedia explains several regional variations (I think I just answered my own question). It would not surprise me one iota if places on the same *block* had arguments about how to make a "proper" morcilla.

Damn, I had the *best* blood sausage recently, and I can't remember where. I can remember *exactly* what it was like - texture, casing - even the temperature, and what it looked like after being cut. But damned if I can remember where it was, or even what it was.

Related thread: Boudin Noir in Washington, DC Restaurants and Dining, and look at this picture of morcilla in there by Gerry Dawes (as mentioned in the Wikipedia link, this is Morcilla de Burgos).

You know, even to me, "blood pudding" sounds somewhat disgusting, but really, what's the difference between that and a medium-rare steak?

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You know, even to me, "blood pudding" sounds somewhat disgusting, but really, what's the difference between that and a medium-rare steak?

There's no blood in a medium rare (or even a raw) steak.

But it's an interesting question for American carnivores to address.  Why is muscle and skin ok to eat, but blood is gross?  I happen to love blood sausage in all forms, and recently enjoyed a bowl of Dinuguan from Manila Mart in Beltsville.  I actually had to convince the nice lady behind the steam table to sell it to me, as she assumed that all white Americans thought cooking with blood was gross.

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