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sheldman

Tail Up Goat, Chef Jon Sybert, Beverage Director Bill Jensen, and Service Director Jill Tyler All Come from the Komi Team - Adams Morgan

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4 visits so far and I love Tail up Goat!  Bread and pasta dishes are superb!  I especially enjoyed the brown rice bread first with fermented turnips, yogurt, hazelnut picada and now with roasted carrot, blood orange, hazelnut picada.  Another favorite:  carrot ravioli, ramp greens, pistachio breadcrumbs, apricots!  I enjoyed the lamb ribs of course, but the whole stuffed porgy, sunchokes, black walnut, ramps even more if that is possible.  The almond cake with mascarpone and rhubarb jam was a delectable way to end the meal.  Now I'm hungry!

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I went a few days ago to Tail Up. I wanted to give it another whirl cuz but I wasn't like blownnnn away. I felt it was good with some courses being better then others. The Lasangna was the best thing to me but I think in general I was off in my ordering. I saw someone get that ravioli above and wished I had tried that as well as the potato salad with trout roe. My main course was not my fave. I got the pork but the spicy "jam" was not a great addition and I just wasn't like "OMG BEST PORK QUALITY EVAAA." Neverdaless, I would go back again and I urge ya'll peeps to go as well it certainly is one of the better places in the city and better then like Mintwood and Cashions and other admo places in my opinion. 

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Let me pile on. Went Sunday, May 8 around 6pm for a spontaneous get together with some industry friends who live down the street. In all we had a group of 6, and were able to post along the corner seats at the bar (the ones adjacent to the hostess stand) as soon as we got there. 

Summary judgment: Food? Excellent. Service? Excellent. Environment? Excellent.

Maybe I'll come back and edit this post to give the full rundown on everything we ate and drank (it ended up being A LOT), but everyone else has pretty much nailed it. [Who does bread this good anyway?

Also apologies to anyone else dining that night in our vicinity as we were, um, boisterous. Yes, we were that group, but fortunately the restaurant design allows for a decent separation between dining room and bar, and the other bar patrons seemed amused if anything.

 

 

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After a third visit Tail Up Goat is by far my favorite restaurant in the area. Sat at the bar tonight for dinner. The cocktails, wine, service and food were all perfect. I'm in love with a restaurant. 

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Had a chance to go as well Sunday night, sat at the bar and had a wonderful meal.  The brown rice bread was incredible, it was so flavorful and well balanced, and something that stands out among all the new great restaurants in DC.  All the dishes were actually really well balanced, with sweetness playing into most of the other dishes I had as well (carrot puree) in the ravioli and beets with the lamb ribs, which as a dish was rich and flavorful and decently filling.  

One thing to warn others who haven't been is that the lamb ribs does come with a lot of cilantro that I had to spend some time picking off.  This is in no way limited to Tail Up Goat, as many restaurants do this, but I do wish if cilantro was on a dish it would be noted on the menu.  It might be a small thing or garnish for some people, but it is really an offensive taste for others (like me).  I can't be the only one who thinks this, right?  I know there are a lot of cilantro haters out there.

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5 hours ago, dz50 said:

This is in no way limited to Tail Up Goat, as many restaurants do this, but I do wish if cilantro was on a dish it would be noted on the menu.  It might be a small thing or garnish for some people, but it is really an offensive taste for others (like me).  I can't be the only one who thinks this, right?  I know there are a lot of cilantro haters out there.

You're not the only one.

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23 hours ago, dz50 said:

 I can't be the only one who thinks this, right?  I know there are a lot of cilantro haters out there.

You are definitely not! I would be upset about that.

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I swear I'm not just saying this cause of the similarity in names, but does Tail Up Goat strike anyone else as having similar flavor profiles to Fainting Goat?  Smoke/char vs. creamy/unctuous with good use of texture and an emphasis on the more rustic?  I couldn't get over that after dinner here the other night, which was quite good, although a bit of a tough place for my gluten-free SO (though they were great about hand-marking a menu to note the gluten-free dishes, a very nice service touch).  Would like to go back and just eat bread there -- looked delicious but didn't bother trying it this time.

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The beet greens and the roasted half-chicken I had here last night were two of my favorite dishes in recent memory; this kitchen is really humming on all cylinders.  Plus the bar program is fantastic and the service was, as always, wonderfully warm.  Thanks to Jill especially for making me feel at home each time I come in.  This restaurant is a remarkable treasure and I'm so happy to have it in Adams Morgan.

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Just now, Gadarene said:

Plus the bar program is fantastic and the service was, as always, wonderfully warm.  Thanks to Jill especially for making me feel at home each time I come in.  

I can't believe I haven't posted on this restaurant yet. Love the food, but the service is absolutely incredible. Jill is wonderful. 

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We headed back to Tail Up Goat last night with some friends who just moved to town. I loved introducing them to what is quickly becoming my favorite restaurant in town. We ordered an absurd amount of food for four people but it was all outstanding. I fear at some point the words "amazing" and "outstanding" will loose their meaning in my posts about Tail Up Goat but we genuinely had an outstanding experience and the food was amazing. 

We started with the crispy salt cod again and added the grilled rabbit sausage and the snap peas this trip. The crispy cod was just the perfect bite of deliciousness. The snap peas were expertly cooked! A bright green and just the right amount of crispness and subtle flavor.  Our friends ordered the rabbit, it wouldn't have been something I would order (mostly because my son was horrified the last time I ordered a rabbit dish as his special stuffed animal friend is a bunny but some things are best left unsaid) but the rabbit was tasty and I'm glad I tried it.

We also ordered the seaweed sourdough and the red grit sourdough and all I can say is that I would beg, borrow or steal a loaf of their sourdough if I could. Their bread is stupid good. I would keep coming for that alone. Its a toss up which I liked more, the seaweed or the brown rice bread we ordered on our previous trip. Both are not to be missed! 

My husband ordered the potato salad and the grilled pork. I didn't try the potato salad and only got a bite of the pork but he said both were great choices. 

Our friends split the whole stuffed porgy and loved it. This is what I ordered last time and can attest its fantastic. I'd go back to that in a heart beat.

I was flip flopping between the half roasted chicken and the carrot ravioli, which we ordered on our last trip and loved. I ended up with the chicken since I hadn't had it before and so that the husband could try it. This could have easily fed two people as an entree but its also great to have left overs! I'm looking forward to tucking into them as soon as I finish this review. 

We skipped the dessert and all had a glass of madeira instead. I know I raved about the wine list in my last post so I won't spend too much time on it in this one but I will say that its such a treat to know whatever Bill Jensen picks will be spot on. This is probably my favorite wine list in town because of its playfulness. I started out again with a glass of the Greek sparkling wine and I would suggest everyone do so, its a fun start to the meal. I tried a glass of orange wine and then settled into my new favorite, 7 Fuentes. I need some of this in my house! We ended with a Madeira from New York that I'm already blanking on the name but its the last one on the list. Outstanding and you guessed it, amazing! 

 

 

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IMO the mark of a great restaurant is one whose entrees are just as well-conceived and executed as the usually more "creative" starters.  The grilled pork with farro in brown butter that we had a few weeks back fit the bill.  The farro was rich and buttery, but not at all overwhelming given what we had eaten already.  Almost the star of the dish.  At most places it would've been an afterthought.

Of course we loved the seaweed sourdough too -- it was reminiscent of open-faced sandwiches we loved in Copenhagen -- as well as the beef tartare special that appears to have made its way to the main menu now.

With two young kids now we really don't have the time or energy to trek into DC for fun meals more than once every few months, so there will always be a dilemma deciding between whether to return to places that we enjoyed so much (here, Convivial, Rose's Luxury) or go where we still haven't been yet (Red Hen, Metier/Kinship, The Grill Room).

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With one night to have a proper dinner in D.C. since moving away five years ago, the choice of restaurant had become a tortuous pre-flight decision. Procuring research from poorly-lit Instagram uploads and carefully read DonRockwell.com passages, I turned my back on old favorites in new places (Ziebold, Ruta) and I went with the not even six-month-old upstart in Adams Morgan -- a decision the staff at Tail Up Goat made sure I wouldn’t regret.

Boulevard Hibiscus Gose ($7) - On tap, relatively inexpensive and paired well with everything. I had three.

“Potato salad”, trout roe, charred spring onion, crème fraiche, seeds, dill ($14) - In my previous online stalking of this dish it was presented with fingerlings cut lengthwise. My version featured red bliss potatoes untouched by a knife. Not sure if it was a sourcing issue at the time but it took the presentation down some. Taste was excellent, however. The salty-creamy-herby combination of a regular potato salad kicked up a bit.

Pappardelle, green tomato ragu, braised goat, pickled raisins, fiore sardo ($18) - The dish of the night ©. The ragu was made with love and lighter than most, while braised meats and fresh pasta is one of my personal favorite marriages of all-time. The pickled raisins were what really took it from great to excellent, though -- a phenomenal addition.

Lamb ribs, sumac onions, cilantro, beets, yogurt, hazelnut dukkah ($44) - Probably their showpiece signature dish at this point, and for good reason. I’ve heard complaints of too much fat on these bones, but I like the contrast between the leaner meat and rendered good stuff. Ribs should be a bit of an adventure at times, not just a sweet, homogenous plank of meat.

The creator blessed me with the cilantro-loving gene so everything else going on here was top notch. I loathed the beet (and cheese) trend but here they were perfect. Again, the restaurant nailed the eclectic semi-Mediterranean theme that resonates through their menu.

Stuffed, immensely satisfied and convinced there was no other restaurant in the city I would’ve rather been at that night, I also became quickly jealous that Tail Up Goat was not in my own zip code. It’s exactly the sort of restaurant that enriches a neighborhood and a city -- I hope it’s still as popular as ever in another half decade.

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On 7/26/2016 at 1:36 AM, will_5198 said:

“Potato salad”, trout roe, charred spring onion, crème fraiche, seeds, dill ($14) - In my previous online stalking of this dish it was presented with fingerlings cut lengthwise. My version featured red bliss potatoes untouched by a knife. Not sure if it was a sourcing issue at the time but it took the presentation down some. 

I've had this dish three or four times, and the potatoes have been slightly different every time.  Always delicious, however.  The current version with pickled fennel stems in lieu of the charred alliums that have rotated through previously (ramps, spring onions) may be my favorite, thanks to their hit of bright acidity.  (Definitely didn't expect that!  I'm a sucker for onions and not usually a fennel lover.)  

So much has been posted about how great this place is, how wonderful Bill and Jill both are in the front of the house, but I can't help but echo the compliments.  I've been to TUG more than a dozen times since they opened, whether for a full dinner or just drinks and a few dishes at the bar, and it's only gotten better since the beginning (and as they get more great summer produce).  The pici pasta with uni, squash blossom, and calabrian chili breadcrumbs was so good on our last visit that we ordered a second round.  Rather than using lobes as a garnish, the thick spaghetti-like pasta (think buccatini without the hole down the middle) is dressed in a smooth, urchin-rich orange sauce.  (I first fell in love with urchin at a years-ago Komi dinner, when a similarly pureed sauce garnished an early raw fish course.  It was the first time I can recall relishing the flavor without being put off by the texture.)  Fair warning, it's a bit expensive at $21 -- presumably due to the cost of the uni -- for the not huge size.  But worth it.  We'll be going back soon to try the ravioli; corn and sungolds are two of my favorite summer ingredients.

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1 hour ago, jca76 said:

The pici pasta with uni, squash blossom, and calabrian chili breadcrumbs was so good on our last visit that we ordered a second round.  Rather than using lobes as a garnish, the thick spaghetti-like pasta (think buccatini without the hole down the middle) is dressed in a smooth, urchin-rich orange sauce.  (I first fell in love with urchin at a years-ago Komi dinner, when a similarly pureed sauce garnished an early raw fish course.  It was the first time I can recall relishing the flavor without being put off by the texture.)  Fair warning, it's a bit expensive at $21 -- presumably due to the cost of the uni -- for the not huge size.  But worth it.  We'll be going back soon to try the ravioli; corn and sungolds are two of my favorite summer ingredients.

This (wistfully) reminds me of uni pasta I had in Catania, Sicily, about a year ago, which was one of the greatest eating experiences I've ever had.  The city (from which you can see Mt Etna) has an incredible fish market, and in the middle of said fish market was the restaurant that served fresh bucatini (I think) dressed with uni pulled straight out of the sea.  Straightforward, simple, and incredible.  I'll have to try this version at Tail Up Goat next time we go!

 

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3 hours ago, notquiteanonymous said:

This (wistfully) reminds me of uni pasta I had in Catania, Sicily, about a year ago, which was one of the greatest eating experiences I've ever had.  The city (from which you can see Mt Etna) has an incredible fish market, and in the middle of said fish market was the restaurant that served fresh bucatini (I think) dressed with uni pulled straight out of the sea.  Straightforward, simple, and incredible.  I'll have to try this version at Tail Up Goat next time we go!

 

I had a similar dish as well at Esca in Manhattan several years ago.  It was certainly the standout dish that evening.

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I think 2.5 stars from Seitsema is about right.  There are some good dishes, but nothing that makes me swoon (based only on 2 visits).  It could very well be that I don't eat usually eat bread and haven't tried any of their breads.

The stracciatella (with peaches, pea shoots, oat crumble) was a combination of sweet and savory which actually works very well.  I was surprised by how tasty it was (kind of like the lychee salad at Rose's).  I think this could've been a dessert course (because it's more sweet than savory).

The cotechino with peas with a small piece of sausage for $14?  

The pici with urchin was unremarkable.  The sauce was slightly fishy, with not nearly enough urchin flavor to satisfy my palate.  I think I bitch about urchin pasta all the time (with few exceptions) so...

The corn ravioli was an exercise in extracting the sweetness from corn.  I enjoyed it.

Ah the lamb ribs - people have complained about how fatty it is.  Yes it is very fatty, but tasty.  I would say it's almost as good as the lamb at Komi or Kapnos (they're just as tasty, but not so fatty, but much more expensive).  But the best I've ever had was in Marrakech, there's an alley of mechoui venders just off the Jemaa El Fnaa Square that will serve you roasted in ground lamb for just a few bucks, which you dip into a mixture of spices (mostly cumin and salt).  The fact that it was dirt cheap may have persuaded me to elevate it above others...

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I continue to think that Tail Up Goat is the most awesome place in DC.  They are doing great business, which is lovely for them, yet it is still possible to wander in early and grab a couple of seats at the bar (or get a reservation for next week if that's what you're into).  

Tonight my son and I sat and ate the two veg bread options - including the new "red grit sourdough, heirloom tomatoes, 1000 island, bread + butter pickles [13]" which is ridiculously good including the best tomatoes I've had all summer - and then dessert including "orange + olive oil sherbet, black lime cashews, ginger crumble [10]."

My "thing" these days, in terms of cooking, is balance among textures and taste/smell senses - and this restaurant is perfect in that way. No dish is overweighted in any direction - each dish balances itself well. And in terms of atmosphere, it is friendly and warm.  Someday I will explain my theory as to why such a restaurant could only exist now thanks to Uber, but that is for another day.

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"my theory as to why such a restaurant could only exist now thanks to Uber"

Lemme guess:  No parking within miles; no metro nearby; expensive cabs.  I'll bet you're right that upward of 75% of their customers are either locals on foot, or come and go via Uber.  Me, I've found a parking space every time . . . but sometimes I circle for 15-20 minutes.

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1 hour ago, Marty L. said:

"my theory as to why such a restaurant could only exist now thanks to Uber"

Lemme guess:  No parking within miles; no metro nearby; expensive cabs.  I'll bet you're right that upward of 75% of their customers are either locals on foot, or come and go via Uber.  Me, I've found a parking space every time . . . but sometimes I circle for 15-20 minutes.

It's right next to the 42 and the Circulator!  Won't somebody think of the poor buses?

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2 hours ago, Marty L. said:

"my theory as to why such a restaurant could only exist now thanks to Uber"

Lemme guess:  No parking within miles; no metro nearby; expensive cabs.  I'll bet you're right that upward of 75% of their customers are either locals on foot, or come and go via Uber.  Me, I've found a parking space every time . . . but sometimes I circle for 15-20 minutes.

I lived in that neighborhood for years, and parking is not great.  Best bet is probably to park on Harvard (there's usually parking near the Zoo) and walk - you'll spend more time walking but less time circling.

I haven't been back since it first opened (because we have a toddler, not because we had a bad experience), but I would go again.  I would, however, do some homework before I went - ordering well seemed important, at least in version 1.0 (maybe even beta 0.9.9) of the menu.

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