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sheldman

Tail Up Goat, Chef Jon Sybert, Beverage Director Bill Jensen, and Service Director Jill Tyler All Come from the Komi Team - Adams Morgan

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Had dinner there last night with a dear colleague.  Both of our first times trying and we were both extremely impressed with everything from the wine to the food to the decor / service.

It was also my first opportunity to try a wine from Lightwell Survey (Sebastian Zutants label) - "You're a Wild One" which is a unique blend of mostly Cabernet Franc with a bit of Petit Manseng thrown in.  This was amazingly drinkable stuff that I thought was pretty unique.

In terms of food we had:

- BBQ Carrots (I literally almost licked the dish clean - would highly recommend)

- Einkorn Sourdough with Chicken Liver Mousse - loved the char on the bread which really complemented the smoothness of the mousse

- Tagliatelle - while this was good - I likely would order a different pasta next time.  I didn't get a lot of flavor out of the breadcrumbs and my dining partner commented that it almost felt like "eating sand" in the pasta

- Lamb Ribs - the accolades folks have heaped on them are well deserved in my opinion.  A huge plate of meaty ribs - I was pretty stuffed after we demolished this plate.

- Dessert we had the Oat Cake and Apple Sorbet - I liked the clean flavors in the sorbet, and the surprise hit of tumeric actually worked quite well

It wasn't a cheap meal but we also basically rolled out of there due to being so full - what a wonderful spot and one that once the twins grow up a bit more and give my wife and I some freedom back, we'll be heading to for a date night in the future.

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Had dinner here two weeks ago with @MichaelBDC to celebrate our five years of dating bliss. I was battling a stubborn cold, but had really been looking forward to TUG and insisted we keep our long awaited reservations. 

We started with two glasses of lambrusco and then had yellowfin tuna crudo, a spring salad over red grits, Einkorn Sourdough, salami cotto, and a tomahawk pork chop that was on special. Midway through the meal, I switched to a riesling while @MichaelBDC had a glass of red wine. The food was delicious despite my taste buds being a little off due to the aforementioned cold. Each dish was interesting in its own way, had good texture, and was well executed. Service was warm and friendly. Looking back, the overall impression we were left with at TUG was just how solid the experience was. Our only regret was not ordering the lamb ribs, which looked amazing coming out of the kitchen. Next time...

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Notice what is *not* on the current TuG menu.  I, for one, think it's a welcome development--but I suppose if the signature dish were your favorite, or go-to, dish, it might take some getting used to.

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That’s brave but understandable,  maybe they could have just added a dish. I don’t really love lamb ribs, though It was a really well made and well thought-out dish. After the first visit I always ordered the fish

i was there two weeks ago and still think it’s very good, especially the fish, the focaccia and sherry pork tagliatelle.  Service at the bar was terrific. I live only a few blocks away, and would be a regular if I could afford it.

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3 hours ago, Harbinger said:

That’s brave but understandable,  maybe they could have just added a dish. I don’t really love lamb ribs, though It was a really well made and well thought-out dish. After the first visit I always ordered the fish.

I agree that it was a really well-done dish, but one I rarely ordered because it was so rich and the other offerings were better value.  Jill Tyler asked me to send along this message from TuG regarding the change-of-pace:

"The lamb ribs had a great run but the kitchen is excited to be shaking things up.  Most importantly, we weren't able to work with local farms to get our lamb because of the sheer number of ribs we were selling.  Now all of our pork, beef, poultry, rabbits and seafood are from farms and fisherman that we have personal relationships with -- that matters.  It means we are supporting other small businesses and supporting better food systems."

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5 hours ago, Marty L. said:

Notice what is *not* on the current TuG menu.  I, for one, think it's a welcome development--but I suppose if the signature dish were your favorite, or go-to, dish, it might take some getting used to.

You know what? I had no idea the lamb ribs were their signature dish; if you'd have asked me, I would have guessed it was the bread courses (which I suppose are "just" crostini on exotic steroids).

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17 hours ago, DonRocks said:

You know what? I had no idea the lamb ribs were their signature dish; if you'd have asked me, I would have guessed it was the bread courses (which I suppose are "just" crostini on exotic steroids).

We had an amazing meal at TuG last summer but my wife is not a lamb fan so we didn't get the ribs. The pork loin/belly entree might entice her though, but honestly, the other courses are so good you really don't need the entree.

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Nooooo I would've wanted to try the lamb ribs one more time before they went off menu although everything I've there over 4 visits has been so amazing I'm not terribly worried about them filling in something else amazing.

I meant to get them last time I went about a month ago but they had a dairy cow strip steak special with ramp butter... this was probably the best steak I've ever had (small pieces of wagyu excluded) - even besting Kinship's incredible ribeye in my opinion.  

I'm sure I'll be back soon to try the new pork (or whatever else) being that at the moment Tail Up Goat is pretty easily my #1 favorite place in DC outside of tasting menu spots.

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Finally made it here last night with the wife. Some parts were great, but others disappointing. Maybe I chose poorly, but I was not hugely impressed.

We had:

Crispy salt cod: this was solid, though the smoked cauliflower was a little rich.

Salami cotto: also good, though more acid in the accompanying peperonata would have cut through the fat better.

einkorn sourdough  with yoghurt and smoked trout roe - my favorite dish of the night, though the bread was a little too charred at the edges.

corzetti and garganelli - the pasta itself was good, particularly the garganelli, but the pesto with the corzetti was a one-dimensional. Like Rovers2000 I found the breadcrumbs with the corzetti a little like eating sand.

Then we split the pork loin and peach glazed belly - this was the low point of the meal for me. The peach glaze was horribly sweet, and with the fatty belly almost inedible. No desire for dessert after that.

The wine was great, but overall I found the food too rich. It is also extremely expensive. It was packed though, so clearly the prices are not high enough to put anyone off.

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Dinner here on a blustery evening yesterday was a highlight and made me wonder why we hadn't been yet.  I was disappointed to learn that they didn't allow corkage, but the sommelier guided us to a lovely red from the Loire Valley that paired well with all of the offerings.  The food was fantastic; we loved the crispy salt cod, it was rich and good winter food, and really enjoyed last night's cheese course.  The stuffed porgy was wonderful; perfectly cooked and well spiced, restaurants don't always do these share dishes well but knocked this one out of the park.  I agree with some of the posters above about this not being the cheapest meal, but it also doesn't compare to places like Joe's Stone Crab or RPM.  We got a $60 bottle of wine, 5 courses and dessert for under $200, and 2 small gratis courses from the kitchen.  Not necessarily a place to hit every night, but this will definitely be in our rotation a couple times a year.

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Pictures I took from the innaugural brunch service at TuG on 12/2 (thank you window lighting).  Really enjoyed the meal and at only $40 a person for 3 courses a pretty damn good deal all things considered to try the awesome cooking here.  I managed to get NYE reservations here which I'm extremely excited for.
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Finally made it for "brunch" yesterday. The way to think about this is not as a very pricey brunch (albeit way cheaper than hotel brunches and the likes of Fiola Mare), but as an early, bargain Sunday supper.  A couple of the items are vaguely reminiscent of brunch food (e.g., the ricotta "pancake" pictured above), but in truth it's simply three excellent, delicious Jon Sybert dishes for less than you'd pay at dinner!  (I had the pork belly and tagliatelle, both fantastic, and a nice semolina custard.)

It's also really nice to be at TuG during the day, in the light--quiet, peaceful, and, as always, as welcoming as any place in DC this side of 2 Amys.

Disclosure:  My son works there occasionally.

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Had dinner there Saturday night with a friend - place was always busy.  Great service and the food shines.  One quip - the meatballs that accompanied the foccacia were salty (and I like salt).  My daiquiri was delicious and I loved the spotlight on Portuguese wines.  So glad I made the effort to go.

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Friends treated me to dinner here last night and it was fabulous.  We shared about 2/3rds of the menu between the three of us.  This place does wonderful things with vegetables and breads.  farro sourdough, benne seed + aji dulce yogurt, roasted + fermented carrots, daikon, flax seed -- we were amazed there was no meat in this dish, so much umami!   

Sunchokes were good but overshadowed by other menu items.  Cheese course was served as more of a shaved cheese salad; also good but maybe would have been better ordered as a dessert/final course than in the early rounds.

I was evenly split on which was the better of the two pastas we ordered, both excellent IMO.  One friend didn't like the funk of the taleggio & mustard greens and so preferred the gorro, the other was into the funk and found the gorro too mild.

taleggio ravioli, smoky mushrooms, mustard greens, mustardy breadcrumbs -- 
gorro de bruja, pistachio pesto, goat feta, confit onion, olives, nutmeg breadcrumb

seared halibut, acqua pazza, fermented + roasted fennel, salsa verde, calabrian chilies -- the only miss of the night.  The fish was a bit overdone and cool so it spent too much time at the pass and suffered for it.  However, the sauce was wonderfully balanced, and if the fish had been on point, this would have been outstanding.

caramelized sweet potato, butter lettuce, smoked apple butter, parm, yogurt, apple + candied olive -- done well but the sauce was not as interesting as that on the halibut and because of the sweet potato as the center of the dish, a little sweet to my palate for a main dish.

We got all of the desserts.  The turmeric sorbet would make a great palate cleanser between courses; I didn't find its tartness and flavor balance compelling as a finish to the meal.  The rainwater madiera custard w/ pistachio was perfectly balanced between silky smooth and buttery-nutty crunch.  The brioche bread pudding was miles above any bread pudding I've ever had, somewhat deconstructed, every bite having layers of flavors, there was a spoon battle going on with everyone trying to get another bite and another bite.

We also had an interesting rose with the meal, very spice forward with a lovely fennel-y finish, Etna Rosato, “Rosso Relativo,” Alice Bonaccorsi, Sicily, Italy, 2013 

And very early on a cold, blustery Sunday evening in the middle of the shutdown, the place was packed and I can easily imagine they turned all the tables twice, so good on them.  

And if I was going back on my own limited budget, I would have a glass of wine at the bar and the farro sourdough, then pack up & go and pride myself on my restraint. 

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Last week I attended the special "Dairy Cow Dinner" Tail up Goat hosted where every course featured beef from dairy cow/cows from "Earth n Eats".  As with the other Tail up Goat event dinners I've been to this awesome, with the main featured giant steak brought out reminding me a Komi final meat course meets (meats) a high end steak house.  Was certainly stuffed by the end from the courses plus the wine pairings but no complaints on my end.  Pictures and further descriptions from my IG:

 

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17 hours ago, Jonathan said:

Reminds me (in a very delicious way) of the Beef Feast Dinners I did at Palena.

That Palena dinner may have been one of the best dinner I had in my life.  If this was marginally close even, I might have to get on their list for special events and see if they do it again.

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