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pras

What Millennials Want in a House

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I read an article online today from the Washington post about what Millennials want in a house.  I am not even 40 yet (although I am closer to 40 than 30) but I am really starting to feel old and that I am no longer hip.  I mean, a shower head that turns the water purple?  That is what my 5 year old wants (although her's creates a rainbow of light).  I get that they want natural materials and a connected home (I want that too!), but is the author serious about the shower head?  Does anyone else feel out of touch or is it just me?

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I don't know about the shower head.  It seemed kind of tossed in there based on seeing a booth at a trade show.  We just bought a place in Houston, and looked at a ton of houses that had either been very recently renovated or were newly built.  My wife and I are Gen Xers, not Millenials, but we would've laughed out loud if an agent showed us a house with that feature.

Everything else in the article appealed to me though (with the exception of the silly kitchen drawers with precise cut-outs for specialty tools).

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I don't know about the shower head.  It seemed kind of tossed in there based on seeing a booth at a trade show.  We just bought a place in Houston, and looked at a ton of houses that had either been very recently renovated or were newly built.  My wife and I are Gen Xers, not Millenials, but we would've laughed out loud if an agent showed us a house with that feature.

Everything else in the article appealed to me though (with the exception of the silly kitchen drawers with precise cut-outs for specialty tools).

Don't get me wrong, I agree with you.  It might be a sign of me getting crotchety, but who wouldn't want those features?  Why is it what "millennials" want in a house?  It is what people want in a house.

Funny thing, a friend of mine works for a local developer looking to build a high-rise condo building in the "Pike" district or as I like to call it North North Georgetown, and they did a focus group to see what the demographic wanted.  Open floor plan you might thin?  No, these older ladies want the kitchen separate from the dinning space.  Why?  Because when they are entertaining, they don't want the guests to see the mess in the kitchen.  They want a formal space.  The house my wife and I ended up purchasing has a wall between the kitchen and dinning room.  At first we didn't like this.  We even looked into what it would take to remove the wall, but it was a pretty big job.  Turns out, we like it and a lot of people are envious of the layout!

It is just funny to me how different generations are spread out and catered to.  Maybe I am naive, but I think in the end people are people.

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Slight tangent here, but some of my work touches on Millennial preferences (in a very different area) and one of the hardest things to parse out is whether differences in preferences (and there are many) are actually generational differences or just age differences.  The distinction is important (you will grow out of an age, but not a generation; lots of things people assume "Millennials" like are just things kids in their 20s have always liked) but almost no one talks about this. If anyone has come across anything interesting on generational vs age differences, let me know!

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Slight tangent here, but some of my work touches on Millennial preferences (in a very different area) and one of the hardest things to parse out is whether differences in preferences (and there are many) are actually generational differences or just age differences.  The distinction is important (you will grow out of an age, but not a generation; lots of things people assume "Millennials" like are just things kids in their 20s have always liked) but almost no one talks about this. If anyone has come across anything interesting on generational vs age differences, let me know!

I think you nailed it exactly.  I never thought I would live where I do, but once it became time to enroll my daughter in Kindergarten, that changed quickly changed.  All of this stuff about the suburbs being dead is a bunch of bull.  Also the talk about where people are willing to work is bull.  If you offer someone a good job, they will take it.  How many people drive from Frederick to a Job in Reston, or Woodbridge to Bethesda?

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I think you nailed it exactly.  I never thought I would live where I do, but once it became time to enroll my daughter in Kindergarten, that changed quickly changed.  All of this stuff about the suburbs being dead is a bunch of bull.  Also the talk about where people are willing to work is bull.  If you offer someone a good job, they will take it.  How many people drive from Frederick to a Job in Reston, or Woodbridge to Bethesda?

Having kids changes a lot of "preferences" and perspectives on things. You find that a model of car you once mocked suddenly has become a necessity.  Where you live and the desired features of your accommodation change dramatically.  Things that used to be important become ephemeral at best. Pretty much no one really understands this until actually going through it.

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Having kids changes a lot of "preferences" and perspectives on things. You find that a model of car you once mocked suddenly has become a necessity.  Where you live and the desired features of your accommodation change dramatically.  Things that used to be important become ephemeral at best. Pretty much no one really understands this until actually going through it.

I grew up in a 1955 split level with a separate kitchen-living room-dining room and loved it, but they don't seem to be terribly popular anymore, at least not in terms of new construction.

Hell, I *bought* a split level with a similar configuration in 1992, but in reality, there was a lot of unused space.

It seems that tear-downs in Arlington (those *awful* Broyhill Colonials) are being replaced by mostly modern versions of colonials these days.

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On 4/1/2016 at 4:50 AM, pras said:

Don't get me wrong, I agree with you.  It might be a sign of me getting crotchety, but who wouldn't want those features?  Why is it what "millennials" want in a house?  It is what people want in a house.

The first thing that came to my mind when I read this sentence was the post WWII split-level, with the classic, divided kitchen, dining room, and living room (*exactly* the house I grew up in, which my parents bought brand new in 1955 for $26,000, and my mom living there for over 55 years!). Separate spaces for all three began to fall out of demand when people started wanting open kitchens, less partitions, and more light in their homes.

So if pre-baby boomers (I don't even know what they were called - The WWII generation? The Greatest generation?) can be pigeon-holed, why not Millenials? People buying first houses now surely want different features than people buying first houses in the 80s, when they came home from the mall in their mini-vans. :)

---

I just learned of this article, which provides a loose classification of the generations:

"Generations X, Y, Z, and the Others" on socialmarketing.org

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34 minutes ago, DonRocks said:

The first thing that came to my mind when I read this sentence was the post WWII split-level, with the classic, divided kitchen, dining room, and living room (*exactly* the house I grew up in, which my parents bought brand new in 1955 for $26,000, and my mom living there for over 55 years!). Separate spaces for all three began to fall out of demand when people started wanting open kitchens, less partitions, and more light in their homes.

So if pre-baby boomers (I don't even know what they were called - The WWII generation? The Greatest generation?) can be pigeon-holed, why not Millenials? People buying first houses now surely want different features than people buying first houses in the 80s, when they came home from the mall in their mini-vans. :)

---

I just learned of this article, which provides a loose classification of the generations:

"Generations X, Y, Z, and the Others" on socialmarketing.org

I guess when it comes time to sell my house, I will replace the shower heads so they put out purple water.  My daughter's changes colors, she is 6.  I wonder if that meets the criteria. 

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On 4/1/2016 at 8:47 AM, pras said:

All of this stuff about the suburbs being dead is a bunch of bull.

I believe it. I have a family member that lives way out in South Riding Loudoun County and I would swear by her stories it's the next version of a reality show

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On ‎1‎/‎8‎/‎2017 at 5:43 PM, DonRocks said:

The first thing that came to my mind when I read this sentence was the post WWII split-level, with the classic, divided kitchen, dining room, and living room (*exactly* the house I grew up in, which my parents bought brand new in 1955 for $26,000, and my mom living there for over 55 years!). Separate spaces for all three began to fall out of demand when people started wanting open kitchens, less partitions, and more light in their homes.

So if pre-baby boomers (I don't even know what they were called - The WWII generation? The Greatest generation?) can be pigeon-holed, why not Millenials? People buying first houses now surely want different features than people buying first houses in the 80s, when they came home from the mall in their mini-vans. :)

---

I just learned of this article, which provides a loose classification of the generations:

"Generations X, Y, Z, and the Others" on socialmarketing.org

My folks bought their first house in 1953 for $7,000 on Long Island.

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We saw an open house across the street from our flat a few weeks ago.

Anyone wanna take a guess how much this place was selling for?

(click a picture - the actual size will fill your screen)

42308485_2091000144284058_4074978349544374272_o.jpg.411015c3cd351478aed211922649c7f5.jpg

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42340550_2091000307617375_211762434816344064_o.jpg.26f1aad2186cccd2fd385cdddeffa614.jpg

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Some more pix.

42275847_2091000184284054_2774602607551840256_o.jpg.a26851e360497970f6d337a07a1e5054.jpg

The side you're not seeing is the south side of the kitchen and it contains another counter and a large sink. The sink on the island is what you use when you're washing vegetables.

Personally I hate the design of the kitchen but I love the counter space. Open kitchen means lots of cooking smells in the living room and dining area.

42311021_2091000287617377_8184205167739011072_o.jpg.52a0c2010041b0da91c21cdf671d23be.jpg

That's a bathtub and this is part of the master bath.

The former owner of this house has weird tastes.

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$2,995,000

Location is The Castro neighborhood of San Francisco.

Oh, and the bedrooms, bath, closets and study are downstairs. There are two and a half floors below the kitchen/living/dining rooms. The room next to the entryway is an office. Which means the garage is two doors away from one of the bedrooms.

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And this space goes for $8 million. 

It's a 5-BR unit with approx. 5,077 sqf and a 1,281 sqf finished basement area.

13443295_1180304405353641_4034303688662568844_o.jpg.80a05bc99ee2afdcadd52aa439a5dc8e.jpg

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13490677_1180304182020330_8939069787881958722_o.jpg.d4727b97b19701bbe4361c8bf6e715fc.jpg

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13497566_1180304178686997_7747373327513809873_o.jpg.0f4927ddd8c396fd566158a8dff0b343.jpg

For the 1 percenter with lots of disposable income.

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It looks quite dark.  I do think that it makes sense to locate the living quarters on the highest and brightest part of the house.  You don't need a lot of light or a view for sleeping or showering.

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12 minutes ago, astrid said:

It looks quite dark.  I do think that it makes sense to locate the living quarters on the highest and brightest part of the house.  You don't need a lot of light or a view for sleeping or showering.

I don't see how this space could be dark, given all the windows - it must be the time of day when the photos were taken.

That said ... I honestly don't see how so many people can afford to purchase homes, and quite honestly, I question whether or not they actually can - there is an immense amount of debt in this country, both on a personal and a governmental level.

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14 hours ago, TrelayneNYC said:

And this space goes for $8 million. 

It's a 5-BR unit with approx. 5,077 sqf and a 1,281 sqf finished basement area.

...

For the 1 percenter with lots of disposable income.

The irony of the possible buyer is likely a bachelor, not a family. Good lort.

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16 hours ago, DonRocks said:

I don't see how this space could be dark, given all the windows - it must be the time of day when the photos were taken.

That said ... I honestly don't see how so many people can afford to purchase homes, and quite honestly, I question whether or not they actually can - there is an immense amount of debt in this country, both on a personal and a governmental level.

No, the photos were taken at 1 pm on a Saturday afternoon. 

These home prices are really inflated and reflective of the real estate bubble in San Francisco. Trust that the rest of the country ain't doing so hot. Our own flat is fine and the building it's situated in changed hands three times in the past three years. The current owners paid $3 million in cash.

For a change of scene, these pix are for a 1 BR-unit two blocks from our place. Quite a come down, eh? The asking price for this space was $575,000. You get what you pay for.

13422430_1180294408687974_1712537070454764099_o.jpg.e71d7bec2672df65b112d21c1970fdae.jpg

13433228_1180294372021311_5159537018882167199_o.jpg.11d07c6836ce51c3c21ba07a69670ce9.jpg

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13475170_1180294375354644_4368889010790708580_o.jpg.0449be0d8f873d2341723c6b99eccbc4.jpg

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7 hours ago, TrelayneNYC said:

No, the photos were taken at 1 pm on a Saturday afternoon. 

These home prices are really inflated and reflective of the real estate bubble in San Francisco. Trust that the rest of the country ain't doing so hot. Our own flat is fine and the building it's situated in changed hands three times in the past three years. The current owners paid $3 million in cash.

For a change of scene, these pix are for a 1 BR-unit two blocks from our place. Quite a come down, eh? The asking price for this space was $575,000. You get what you pay for.

Hmm, maybe the sun hits the unit on the wrong side? I mean, there are a *lot* of windows.

You know, there's a strong case to be made for *not* moving. :)

(I personally prefer to look at real estate as an expense; not an investment, but obviously this strategy has not borne out well over the past twenty years.)

And yes, there is one of hell of a bubble.

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On 10/31/2018 at 8:22 PM, TrelayneNYC said:

Some more pix.

42275847_2091000184284054_2774602607551840256_o.jpg.a26851e360497970f6d337a07a1e5054.jpg

The side you're not seeing is the south side of the kitchen and it contains another counter and a large sink. The sink on the island is what you use when you're washing vegetables.

Personally I hate the design of the kitchen but I love the counter space. Open kitchen means lots of cooking smells in the living room and dining area.

42311021_2091000287617377_8184205167739011072_o.jpg.52a0c2010041b0da91c21cdf671d23be.jpg

That's a bathtub and this is part of the master bath.

The former owner of this house has weird tastes.

I don't think this is too weird. I always run from the tub to the shower. This makes it all much easier and less messy. Saving this one.

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