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DonRocks

Physical Therapist Needed - Someone Physically Strong, Who Takes CareFirst

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I'm looking for a physical therapist, preferably in Arlington - I know what type of therapy needs to be done, and the therapist needs to be exceptionally strong, especially in the upper body. 

If anyone has any recommendations, they'd be very appreciated.

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4 hours ago, ktmoomau said:

Kelly was wonderful for a gentleman who I worked with at a prior law firm that needed rehabilitation for a shoulder.  In DC, but they take CareFirst.  Right at Metro Center, so Orange and Silver compatible if that helps.  http://washingtonwellnesspt.com/about.html

I'm getting PT there right now for a hip replacement revision. Blair is great, and the therapy is really making a difference, but I'm not sure she's exceptionally strong.

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I don't have a specific person to recommend, but I was impressed by the therapists who helped me at The Jackson Clinics. That was my only physical therapy experience to date, but it was excellent. They have a number of locations. 

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1 hour ago, reedm said:

I don't have a specific person to recommend, but I was impressed by the therapists who helped me at The Jackson Clinics. That was my only physical therapy experience to date, but it was excellent. They have a number of locations. 

Thank you for all these messages. I actually went to the Jackson Clinic about ten years ago when I had bicep tendonitis (an endlessly painful anterior shoulder which hurt even when I raised a glass of water to my mouth). I followed their instructions to the letter, and the problem completely resolved in three weeks, *but* what I need now involves heavy-duty, one-on-one work on a table; Jackson is sort of a factory, with many people there at the same time, each doing their own rehab (with weights, exercises, stretches, etc) - that wouldn't work in my situation. I'm finding that the best physical therapists - the ones that really work with you - aren't taking CareFirst anymore.

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14 hours ago, saf said:

I'm getting PT there right now for a hip replacement revision. Blair is great, and the therapy is really making a difference, but I'm not sure she's exceptionally strong.

Oh, I missed that part.  Yes, I don't know if Kelly is exceptionally strong, or anyone at her practice, I just don't know her that well.  But she seems very no-nonsense and I think if her company couldn't meet your needs she would say, and might have a recommendation if not.  

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Have you read this piece? Perhaps an email to the author for the name of his PT would be a good idea.

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On 12/7/2016 at 7:28 PM, saf said:

Have you read this piece? Perhaps an email to the author for the name of his PT would be a good idea.

Thanks, Sarah, I'll see if I can find him. I have a proven track record of aggressive PT helping me in the past - three stretches in particular, which are impossible for me to do on my own, and difficult for even a strong person to perform without a harness; I need to find someone who is *strong* and can fit me in ASAP (and who participates with CareFirst).

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1 hour ago, DonRocks said:

I was a ranked MATA tournament player (I guess about 5.0 in USTA league parlance, seeing as though everyone underrates themselves), but injury has reduced me to 0.0 - I haven't stepped on a tennis court in several years, and I've come home to table-tennis, which was my first love as a child. If you're a 4.0 steady baseliner, that means you can keep the ball in one place, so maybe we can hit if you don't mind aiming for one spot. Still looking for help if anyone sees this.

Don, I had no idea you were injured.  I wish I could give you that stellar recommendation you are looking for.  I do have a friend who is a PT.  He's not a big guy but he's very strong.  A good tennis player to boot.  He is not in private practice -- he works for Heatherwood Retirement Facility in Burke, VA.  But I'll ask him whether he knows someone who fits your need. 

I love table tennis as well as regular tennis.  My dad was a national level player but he never taught me how to play (he worked too much).  I played too much of it in college, especially during finals week; got to be OK but could never compete against tournament level players.

If you are still a healthy 5.0 in regular tennis I wouldn't bother to ask you to hit, but given that you are rehabbing, any time you feel like working off some of those great dinners I'm game.  I will do my best to hit to one spot.  

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2 hours ago, FVT said:

If you are still a healthy 5.0 in regular tennis I wouldn't bother to ask you to hit, but given that you are rehabbing, any time you feel like working off some of those great dinners I'm game.  I will do my best to hit to one spot.  

I'm not rehabbing; I've gone 8 years without a correct diagnosis, and nobody is helping me.

I hit for about five minutes in the summer of 2013; before that, the last time I walked onto a tennis court was on Thanksgiving Day, 2011.

I played in the qualifiers of the Legg Mason Championships in 2000, which was the last tournament I played (drew the #1 seed in the first round in a damned draw of 256 (and FWIW, I was up 2-1 in the first set, but I knew even at that moment that the match was over)) - barring a miracle, my career is over.

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2 hours ago, DonRocks said:

I'm not rehabbing; I've gone 8 years without a correct diagnosis, and nobody is helping me.  

Don - Have you read "Healing Back Pain" by Dr. John Sarno?   It's not just about healing back pain but all sorts of pain throughout the body.  I'm only a couple chapters in (after purchasing the book years ago), but one of his main points is people with pain (back, leg, neck, shoulder, elbow, foot, heal, (and even things like ulcers and colitis) etc) are often misdiagnosed and the physical pain you most certainly feel is not due to a physical problem but rather an emotional problem.  Your mind is dealing with some type of stress by causing your body to feel pain.                                                        

  Like I said, I'm only starting the book, but one example he gives is that largest bone in the body, the femur, can be completely broken, and completely heal in 6 weeks (with relatively little pain), yet people suffer for year neck or back pain that "they got" from a very minor car accident, or picking up a very light object.  He even talks about some high powered, high stress executive who suffered from the onset of debilitating pain one day while sitting at his desk.  He had to leave the office in an ambulance and spent a couple days not being able to move at all without excruciating pain, yet there was no physical trigger for the pain.                   

Another interesting data point he mentions is that the chronic pain people suffer from most usually occurs during the "earning years" (30-60 I think).  This is when people are typically under the most pressure to perform, get raises, be successful, etc.  Many people suffer pain in these years and it's often diagnosed as some degradation in muscle mass or bone mass, yet in the older parts of the population (70-90) people don't suffer from these same problems in the same numbers as younger people do.  His point is that it's not the muscles or bones wearing out otherwise the oldest people would be completely debilitated and you could plot it on a curve related to age, but that doesn't happen in the real world.                                                          

Another story he relates that hits home with me is that how many of his patients had pain that would move around the body so as your lower back pain goes away, it's replaced by neck pain.  When your neck gets better, your leg starts hurting.                                                     

Anyhow, it might be worth reading.

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In an amazing coincidence, I read this page on the metro going home tonight. 

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My recommendation is unfortunately in Montgomery County, but I've seen James Gilbert at Metro Orthopedics and Sports Therapy for assorted injuries over the past 16 years. He's a sports medicine guy who has a fantastic staff of physical therapists. MOST takes CareFirst, but be aware: their billing department is the single worst thing about dealing with that practice. There were times in the past where Azami and I almost quit going there because the billing department was so frustrating, but a) it's down the street from my house, and b ) Dr. Gilbert is worth the frustration.

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