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Mark Slater

Food Dictionary Needed!

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Palate: the thing in your mouth that you taste food with

Palette: the thing an artist squirts his oil paints out on

Pallet: how we get our wine shipped to us.

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"Excellent choice, sir."
Yeah, but, when Tom Brown says that at Corduroy, he sounds so sincere that I believe him. :P

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Foodie.

Please.

What's wrong with "please"?

"Foodie" is trendie, yes, but give us a better one that conveys a love for, even obsession with food, without being pretensious or furrin' ... [he says, thinking of "gourmand" ... ]

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A "y" before the word "goodness."

EG: "chocolatey goodness."

I'll use "sourcing," but never "goodness" unless it's something like "Goodness fucking gracious this was bad."

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What's wrong with "please"?

"Foodie" is trendie, yes, but give us a better one that conveys a love for, even obsession with food, without being pretensious or furrin' ... [he says, thinking of "gourmand" ... ]

"Foodie" sounds like "groupie" or "trekkie" -- shallow, trendy and slightly ditzy. Sounds like someone who watches a lot of Rachel Re. It's odious and, of the many derogatory terms that have and/or should be flung my way, I prefer almost all of them to being labled a "foodie."

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What's wrong with "please"?

"Foodie" is trendie, yes, but give us a better one that conveys a love for, even obsession with food, without being pretensious or furrin' ... [he says, thinking of "gourmand" ... ]

Gastronaut.

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garlicy, tasty, hairy...

please reserve the ((Y's)/why's) for adverb usage.

Not withstanding;

...why I hardly get soignė laid by salty strumpettes at Gov't holiday parties anymore.

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Yummy.
Or worse, "yum-o!"

Hear hear to the "sourcing" cranks. Is it used in any other context than food? I'm going to start telling people that I "sourced" my shoes at Nordstrom. :P

(Waitman, "foodie" and "Trekkie", agreed, but "groupie" is a specific and almost honorable profession. :D Surely you've seen Almost Famous?)

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Hear hear to the "sourcing" cranks. Is it used in any other context than food? I'm going to start telling people that I "sourced" my shoes at Nordstrom. :P
Yes, the "supply chain management" logistics-types seem to breathe this stuff. Just say that Nordstrom is one of your preferred vendors...

The first time I saw the word “sourcing” I flashed on a scene from the movie “All the President’s Men” when the Ben Bradley insisted that Woodward and Bernstein needed to go out and find another source before he would publish their Watergate story. I just assumed “sourcing” was a journalism term of art for the act of getting a source for their article.

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Desert island. The island is probably deserted, not a desert.

Now if it were a dessert island, I'd like to visit some day.

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Grammar and mechanics issues lead to people getting the actual names of restaurants and chefs wrong. A few examples:

Dean Gold's restaurant is named Dino, not Dino's.

Wrong: "We ate at Dino's last night"

Right: "We ate at Dino last night"

Also right: "We love Dino's wine list"

The chef at Corduroy is Tom Power, not Tom Powers.

Wrong: We love Tom Powers' soups and scallops

Alternate wrong: We love Tom Powers soups and scallops

Right: We love Tom Power's soups and scallops

Nothing chips away at a writer's credibility like poor grammar mixed with unsure nomenclature, which I believe is what Slater was getting at in his original post.

I predict a sea change in the use of apostrophes [not apostrophe's] coming. Actually, it's already started (see the Dino example): people don't like to see a singular word that ends in a vowel made plural - it looks odd - so they add an apostrophe to separate the offending vowel from the s. Examples:

"At the track last week we saw lots of Fords (right), Saabs (right), Chevy's (wrong), Porsche's (very wrong), Ferrari's (wrong) and Lotus's (oh so wrong, and I blame the Washington Post style book)."

Oh, and a big FUCK YOU to Invision for confusing my correct use of brackets in the sentence above with BBCode, forcing me to change said brackets to parentheses in order to submit the edited post. :P

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Oh, and a big FUCK YOU to Invision for confusing my correct use of brackets in the sentence above with BBCode, forcing me to change said brackets to parentheses in order to submit the edited post. :D

-------------------------------------------------------> . :P

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