Jump to content

Cioppino


Al Dente
 Share

Recommended Posts

I needed something easy to put together for a small dinner party Saturday night, and I had a hankering for Cioppino. I searched the web for recipes and came across this one by my girlfriend (don’t tell my wife) Giada. :P

Picking up some clams, shrimp, monkfish, halibut, and Patagonian toothfish from Slavin’s, I got to work. I’m glad I used a little more fennel than the recipe calls for as the anise flavor (or as the cashier at the grocery store, struggling to find it in her book of produce codes, pronounced it “anus”) seems to be key. I also let the soup base simmer longer (about 90 minutes) which really got the flavors married. It’s great for a dinner party because you could refrigerate the base for use later, then just heat it up to a simmer on the stove top and start dropping in your seafood 10 minutes before serving with some crusty bread. Plus you can use whatever fish and/or shellfish looks best and substitute as I did.

Does anyone have some good variations or tips on this classic?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We make a fish soup from Julia & Jacques Cooking at Home that's sort of bouillabaise & sort of cioppino. I add saffron, and a little orange zest.

Fish stock is easy to make as long as you have enough fish trimmings. Or Balducci's has it in the freezer section.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Fish stock is the easiest stock to make--just fish bones/heads (except salmon), aromatic veg (onion or shallot, leek, celery carrot), herbs (thyme, parsley, bay leaf, black peppercorns), white wine and water. Cook for 30 minutes. Strain. Voila!

BlackSalt sells fish stock. It is made just about every day in the restaurant. Just ask in the market, and they will sell you any amount you want.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mike, was the recipe you used presented as an Italian dish? The only reason I asked is that there were some lively discussions on eGullet about the relationships among different Italian fish stews and cioppino.

Russ Parsons took part in them since he's written about fish stews in the LA Times. While I don't understand what the deal is when it comes to being blocked from reading an archived, complete article at that newspaper vs. the hundreds of accessible copies of the same text at different internet news sources, I finally came across one, complete with recipes if not photos, here.

* * *

Would you be able to tell me more about the policy at Whole Foods regarding trimmings, shells, etc. from seafood that might go into maknig a fish stock of your own?

At Tenleytown I was told that if I called before 11 am, the Seafood team would put aside trimmings for this purpose. Yet, when I showed up once early in the morning, I was told it wasn't possible. This was a time that the department was selling scraps of different kinds of fish and I was told I couldn't get only white-fleshed fish; I'd have to buy a whatever was scooped out.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mike, was the recipe you used presented as an Italian dish?

* * *

Would you be able to tell me more about the policy at Whole Foods regarding trimmings, shells, etc. from seafood that might go into maknig a fish stock of your own?

At Tenleytown I was told that if I called before 11 am, the Seafood team would put aside trimmings for this purpose. Yet, when I showed up once early in the morning, I was told it wasn't possible. This was a time that the department was selling scraps of different kinds of fish and I was told I couldn't get only white-fleshed fish; I'd have to buy a whatever was scooped out.

I don't really know if I "presented" it as an Italian dish. The recipe is called Cioppino, I suppose people can take from that what they may.

As for Whole Foods policy, I'm not sure. I'd suggest calling the store, asking to speak with an ATL or Team Leader in Seafood, asking them about what you specifically need, and, for backup, make sure you get the name of the person who supplied you with the information. There probably isn't a Trimmings and Shells Policy :P , but they should be in the practice of satisfying the customer.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had Cioppino for the first time on a recnet trip to San Diego (don't know why I've never tried it on many visits to San Francisco), but the version I had there was more like a sauce for pasta than a soup or stew. I liked it, but it wasn't what I assumed to be a very authentic version.

So I made this one from Epicurious on Christmas Day with lots of seafood - scallops, crab, cod, shrimp - from Wegman's. Much more "broth-y" like I assume it should be. Very easy and very good.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...