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I wasn't sure whether to post "Hitchcock/Truffaut" in film or literature, because I highly recommend both the book and the documentary about the book.

I bought a paperback version of "Hitchcock/Truffaut" for a friend last summer, and when it arrived, I grabbed his copy and read it cover to cover for about four straight hours. If you are a fan of Alfred Hitchcock, Francois Truffaut or filmmaking in general, this book is a must-read.

The book is based on a 1962 week-long conversation between Hitchcock and the then 30-year-old Truffaut. You get a real sense of both men, their filmmaking style and the art of filmmaking when you read this book.

The documentary, which is readily available to stream online now, is based on the exact same conversation from 1962, but it is very different from the book. Because both directors are no longer living, there are numerous interviews in the film with other iconic movie makers, including Martin Scorsese and Richard Linklater. All share how Hitchcock's groundbreaking filmmaking style influences them and the movies they make.

This is an engaging film that any fan of the cinema should not miss.

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1 hour ago, DIShGo said:

I wasn't sure whether to post "Hitchcock/Truffaut" in film or literature, because I highly recommend both the book and the documentary about the book.

I bought a paperback version of "Hitchcock/Truffaut" for a friend last summer, and when it arrived, I grabbed his copy and read it cover to cover for about four straight hours. If you are a fan of Alfred Hitchcock, Francois Truffaut or filmmaking in general, this book is a must-read.

The book is based on a 1962 week-long conversation between Hitchcock and the then 30-year-old Truffaut. You get a real sense of both men, their filmmaking style and the art of filmmaking when you read this book.

The documentary, which is readily available to stream online now, is based on the exact same conversation from 1962, but it is very different from the book. Because both directors are no longer living, there are numerous interviews in the film with other iconic movie makers, including Martin Scorsese and Richard Linklater. All share how Hitchcock's groundbreaking filmmaking style influences them and the movies they make.

This is an engaging film that any fan of the cinema should not miss.

Wow, I had no idea this documentary had even been made. 

Question: I've been using the book as reference material, reading the interviews about each film after I watched it. Would watching the entire documentary taint my enjoyment of the book? I doubt it, because there's really no "plot" - it's just uncovering layer-after-layer of information about Hitchcock's films. I don't have to watch each film before watching the documentary, or read the book cover-to-cover beforehand, do I?

(Incidentally, this book is probably the single most important and useful work in the "Film" section of my personal library - I can't imagine a better or more important book ever being written.)

I'm waiting on your answer before deciding which film to watch today. I'm a little surprised at how elaborate the production of this was - six cinematographers, for example?!

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55 minutes ago, DonRocks said:

Wow, I had no idea this documentary had even been made. 

Question: I've been using the book as reference material, reading the interviews about each film after I watched it. Would watching the entire documentary taint my enjoyment of the book? I doubt it, because there's really no "plot" - it's just uncovering layer-after-layer of information about Hitchcock's films. I don't have to watch each film before watching the documentary, or read the book cover-to-cover beforehand, do I?

(Incidentally, this book is probably the single most important and useful work in the "Film" section of my personal library - I can't imagine a better or more important book ever being written.)

I'm waiting on your answer before deciding which film to watch today. I'm a little surprised at how elaborate the production of this was - six cinematographers, for example?!

No, watching the documentary will not in any way taint your enjoyment of the book. While the book has spoilers you might want to avoid if you haven't yet watched the films being discussed, the documentary does not. It gives an overall sense of the making of the book, as well as an in-depth look at the tremendous influence Hitchcock has had on the art of filmmaking. I would say the book and the film are companion pieces, but very different and they both stand on their own.

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10 hours ago, DIShGo said:

No, watching the documentary will not in any way taint your enjoyment of the book. While the book has spoilers you might want to avoid if you haven't yet watched the films being discussed, the documentary does not. It gives an overall sense of the making of the book, as well as an in-depth look at the tremendous influence Hitchcock has had on the art of filmmaking. I would say the book and the film are companion pieces, but very different and they both stand on their own.

God, what a great, important - "important" is a word that has inadequate connotation for this documentary - masterpiece. I was going to watch it straight through until the end before commenting, but when Hitchcock talked about Jimmy Stewart waiting for Kim Novak to emerge from the restroom in "Vertigo," and literally "getting an erection" as he's looking at the door, well, I just had to comment on how unbelievable this discussion is. God, I had no idea, and yet, it seems so obvious now that I've heard them banter about this - "Vertigo" is, to date, my favorite Hitchcock film, and that includes "Psycho," which I think is one of the single greatest films ever made.

Okay, here's my summary: This documentary is not for raw beginners; it's for enthusiasts who know a fair amount about both Hitchcock and Truffaut (DIShGo, I think you and I are lucky enough to be in this club). If you *are* in this club, it's one of the greatest documentaries you'll ever watch about film.

I feel absolutely blessed to have been able to see *and* appreciate it. Thank you for starting this thread.

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