Jump to content
DonRocks

Annoying Words and Expressions

Recommended Posts

Sorry to switch from cuisine to basketball, but the use of "big" as a noun is endlessly trite.

"Michael Wang Hauls In Weekly Honors after Offensive Explosions against Miami, La Salle" by Sam Mitchell on thedp.com

"Wang didn’t just light up the scoreboard in an incredibly efficient manner; the forward proved to Quakers’ fans that, given the opportunity, he can be so much more than a pure-scoring big."

Oh, Lord this is annoying.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now that I am posting more often, there are some words and or phrases that I see used  that make me wanna throat punch a pillow. I am not a violent person by any means, but there is certain  jargon that is over used, or not verbalized   in the right context. What sparked this snark, you ask? I'll tell you. I attended a community event on Civic Engagement here in my itty bitty town of York, and if someone had to kick back a  drink every time the word "passion" was used, I would have had a seriously ranging  hangover this morning. 

What saying, and or word sends you over the edge?

@DonRocks move this subtopic to its appropriate location  if this forum is not the best suited for this banter. Thanks!!

@#%$!*&,
kat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, Ericandblueboy said:

 Hate to say it, but made/cooked with "passion" makes more sense.  😉

I have no reservations with the word itself, but it is SO overused. Perhaps cooked with devotion, excitement, vigor, intent... lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Few things annoy me more than the term, "Porn Star."

Please use the term "pornographic performer," or "porn performer" if you need to make it shorter. Use "porn model" if you must.

Stars, they are not; actors, they will never be.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/11/2018 at 8:22 PM, DonRocks said:

"Wang didn’t just light up the scoreboard in an incredibly efficient manner; the forward proved to Quakers’ fans that, given the opportunity, he can be so much more than a pure-scoring big."

I’m sure it’s an irresistible urge to put big and Wang in the same sentence.

  • Confused 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/13/2018 at 1:44 PM, Keithstg said:

Curated.

 
Quote

Dec 15-16 in DC at Union Market. A re-imagined shopping experience. Don’t miss over 60 of the nations most innovative brands for a curated pop up shopping experience that is free to attend. 

Whoever wrote this should be banished.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, Tweaked said:

Bespoke.

Who on earth uses this?

PS - Tom Sietsema is guilty of using "festooned" (it's interesting to read through that).  On a related note, "toothsome" is okay with me *as long as* it's used properly, and with restraint.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, DonRocks said:

Who on earth uses this?

Hipster-dom.

New York Times rant

Along the way, bespoke has devolved from a unique experience to simply a synonym for another catchword of the day: artisanal. At the root of it all may be money, Mr. Riccio said.  “One thing’s for sure,” he said. “Calling something bespoke automatically allows you to add $50 to the price.”

Sietsema has a habit of latching onto a word/term/phrase and then using it to death.  Several years ago he was using the phrase "hired mouth" until someone called him out on his weekly chat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, Tweaked said:

Hipster-dom.

New York Times rant

Along the way, bespoke has devolved from a unique experience to simply a synonym for another catchword of the day: artisanal. At the root of it all may be money, Mr. Riccio said.  “One thing’s for sure,” he said. “Calling something bespoke automatically allows you to add $50 to the price.”

Sietsema has a habit of latching onto a word/term/phrase and then using it to death.  Several years ago he was using the phrase "hired mouth" until someone called him out on his weekly chat.

Maybe I shouldn't admit this, but I had to Google what it meant.

Yes, he used "hired mouth" a lot - I actually think festooned is funny (but it's one of those "home-run words" that jump off the page - it looks thesaurus-y, and there are limits to how many times you can use it in a career (it's a George Will word (nesting parentheses is trite))). Saramago used lack of periods (so did I, as an homage to him), Wallace used footnotes, I use nested parentheses, dammit, because LISP programming comes so natural to me; NATURAL programming, too, but LISP is more like the way I think, plus when I begin a sentence, I have no idea how it's going to end, and I write whatever pops into mind (sometimes there are things that I just HAVE to include (sort of like Frank Ruta)).

BTW, didn't this community agree a few years ago to use "artisan" instead of "artisanal?"

Restaurant Eve's wine list had a section called, "Picaresque Whites" - picaresque isn't used often enough to be trite (in fact, I don't think I've ever seen anyone else use it), but it could get there, real fast.

This thread could also be called "The Write Turd List - William Spooner's Blushing Crows to the English Language." Hell, why not (can you tell I'm going to die in poverty?)

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Agree on bespoke- unless we are talking tailoring, shoemaking, haute couture then it is just a word you are throwing around.  

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Tweaked said:

Bespoke.

Im guilty of using this in reference to tailored clothing. It evokes images of an actual tailor, which I love. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, curiouskitkatt said:

Im guilty of using this in reference to tailored clothing. It evokes images of an actual tailor, which I love. 

But you are right this is an actual thing and how the word is meant to be used- you can get a bespoke suit- which is different from a tailored suit.  It is something wholly made custom for you to the exact specifications and measurements you want, and I don't mean they have your measurements on some sight and made you a custom suit.  You choose fabric cuts, you have it made to your exact porportions, etc.  You can get bespoke shoes, suits, a bespoke wedding dress, this is the correct use of this word.  A bespoke cocktail is not a thing, it's a cocktail made the way you wanted, so it's a cocktail.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, ktmoomau said:

But you are right this is an actual thing and how the word is meant to be used- you can get a bespoke suit- which is different from a tailored suit.  


Just as all cognac is brandy, but not all brandy is cognac, so too, all bespoke is tailored, but not all tailored is bespoke. One is a subset of the other.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Britain's best selling political/satirical magazine Private Eye, which steadfastly ignores the interwebby thing, and seen its sales increase, has, since the 1960's run a series of maybe 15-20 regular mini sections that poke fun at the misuse of language in various aspects of life.
 
Colemanballs: is named after a BBC sports reporter who mixed metaphors.
Birtspeak: for convoluted jargon, named after BBC boss who was an accomplished  practitioner.
The flowery output of authors, journalists, and wine critics turns up regularly in Pseuds Corner.
Solutions is devoted to the unimaginative use of the word in corporate speak.
They also have a series of amusing euphemisms, and running jokes.
Regular readers will immediately understand the term "Discussing Uganda" or "having discussions of a Ugandan nature".
 
Famous people drunk in public are described as "tired & emotional". It came about because on the night of JFK's assassination the deputy Prime Minister was commenting on TV while over the limit. Following complaints, the next day his office issued a statement that he had been "tired & emotional".
The young mistresses of older men, are known as "the gorgeous pouting miss....".
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"... doubles-down on ..."

This blackjack term has become the world's most annoying cliché for "being resolute" about something.

Screenshot 2019-02-24 at 12.19.49.png

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh dear God. I'd never heard of the term "emotional labor" before this evening, and I've now read it twice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/24/2019 at 12:18 PM, DonRocks said:

"... doubles-down on ..."

This blackjack term has become the world's most annoying cliché for "being resolute" about something.

Screenshot 2019-02-24 at 12.19.49.png

Spare me.

Screenshot 2019-03-31 at 19.26.16.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, curiouskitkatt said:

Influencer. I cringe.

I double-down on this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Right?"

I'm at work and I just read a press release that was all jargon and I don't know what the release is about. Here's a clip of the FIRST sentence:
"...cultural shift has been occurring in the (industry) ecosystem."

What the !@#$ does that even mean? An ecosystem can't have a cultural sift. An ecosystem can have a BIOlogical shift or an ecological shift but cultural? Maybe if we were talking about some nice molds. For !@#$% sake. 

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...