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Pool Boy

Prepping for Coronavirus

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I know I am in the minority. But I had Lyme disease about 8 years ago. Ever since, colds and flus are.....worse. Pneumonia. Bronchitis. Ugh.

I was at the grocery store this weekend and decided to stock up. Soups. Broths. Grains. Lentils. Other shelf stable substances that would not require a grocery store visit and thus avoid people.

I know. Paranoia. But still, I have to take precautions given my ody's ability to fight off unusual viruses, colds and infections.

Is anyone else stocking up or am I the only loonie?

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23 hours ago, Pool Boy said:

I know I am in the minority. But I had Lyme disease about 8 years ago. Ever since, colds and flus are.....worse. Pneumonia. Bronchitis. Ugh.

I was at the grocery store this weekend and decided to stock up. Soups. Broths. Grains. Lentils. Other shelf stable substances that would not require a grocery store visit and thus avoid people.

I know. Paranoia. But still, I have to take precautions given my ody's ability to fight off unusual viruses, colds and infections.

Is anyone else stocking up or am I the only loonie?

Youŕe not a loonie. We bought some frozen (and fresh-froze some) food today ourselves - not only because the freezer needed it, but in the event where we'd need to be in for a week or so.

Nothing paranoid about it, and truth be told, nothing lost if you purchase intelligently.

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We are generally overstocked.  Next trip to Sam's club will pick up more paper towels, napkins and toilet paper.  Beer fridge has a few cases of beer and wine cellar is over full.  Party on.

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Not paranoid.  Even with delivery services, trucks don't run if the drivers aren't available to drive them.  I've got a packed freezer and plenty of jars of stuff, but in the next week or so will probably add in extra TP, tissues, frozen fruit juice concentrate, dried beans, dry yeast and some extra flour in case I need to bake bread, plus double check I've got a full load of salt.  And maybe some tetrapak milk.

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Keep the ideas flowing - I did not think about paper products and flour, salt and booze. Gah!

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I have lots of noodle cups: seafood noodle, kimchi rames, udon, somen. Canned beans. Lots of tuna, smoked fish, crackers. We have soda siphons to make beverages and we have Korean drinking vinegar which can go in soda water for a soft drink. We mostly drink coffee & water. We still have loads of booze from the Grotto augmented with more than a few gins. Lot of cocktail onions & stuffed olives. 

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11 hours ago, deangold said:

I have lots of noodle cups: seafood noodle, kimchi rames, udon, somen. Canned beans. Lots of tuna, smoked fish, crackers. We have soda siphons to make beverages and we have Korean drinking vinegar which can go in soda water for a soft drink. We mostly drink coffee & water. We still have loads of booze from the Grotto augmented with more than a few gins. Lot of cocktail onions & stuffed olives. 

The only key ingredient you left out is your address.  :P

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Also, not a bad time to check on your prescription drug supplies. 

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23 minutes ago, Tweaked said:

Also, not a bad time to check on your prescription drug supplies. 

Unfortunately, our profit driven insurance industry will not let you have a stockpile for emergencies. 

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1 hour ago, Bart said:

The only key ingredient you left out is your address.  :P

HMart Fairfax
11200 Fairfax Blvd., Fairfax, VA 22030

😏

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46 minutes ago, deangold said:

Unfortunately, our profit driven insurance industry will not let you have a stockpile for emergencies. 

Most major health insurance providers and Medicare have home delivery options for regularly used prescriptions which allow for 90 or 100 day prescription refills.     

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2 hours ago, Tweaked said:

Also, not a bad time to check on your prescription drug supplies. 

The word "prescription" seems unnecessary. 

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11 minutes ago, Bart said:

The word "prescription" seems unnecessary. 

One wouldn't want to run out of medical edibles.

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KUOW, the Seattle NPR station, posted a recipe for hand sanitizer - just in case you come across barren store shelves.

They specify two-thirds 99% alcohol and discounted subbing cheap vodka (<50% alcohol). The one-third aloe vera gel or vegetable glycerin protects your skin from completely desiccating and flaking-off. 

https://www.kuow.org/stories/purell-is-low-in-seattle-how-to-make-your-own-hand-sanitizer

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3 hours ago, Tweaked said:

Most major health insurance providers and Medicare have home delivery options for regularly used prescriptions which allow for 90 or 100 day prescription refills.     

Hello, US health insurance. CVS will do the 3 month refills at the store as well. Our mail service can be wacky, so I'd rather go to the drugstore than get it by mail.

I had made an appointment with my fairly new PCP about a month ago to go in for a short check-in and prescription refill. With this person and her predecessor, I had been getting an rx for 4 - 90 day fills of my prescription. Everything went great. She sent the rx over. When I went to pick up a new 3-month supply at my neighborhood CVS, I was told my insurance company would not let me fill it yet. I still have about 3 weeks left on the last 90 days. Given what it costs with insurance, I'm not going to pay it for it all so I can have it now.

I had felt lucky to have an appointment set up when I did so I wouldn't have to go into the doctor's office further into the epidemic (plus whatever else is going around and seems to be making lots of people sick). I also wanted to get the drugstore visit over with and make sure the supply of the drug didn't run out. Now I have to go back to the drugstore in a week to get the prescription, which is ready for me to pick up. I cannot imagine how this medication could possibly be abused, so the limitation is weird, but I guess it's an insurance thing.

On the groceries, I typically keep pretty well-stocked. Since our local Trader Joe's opened, I've gotten to picking up a lot more there and doing big trips to Giant and Whole Foods less frequently. I just did a big trip yesterday. I bought maybe 1/4  to 1/5 more than I would typically buy. I keep a small amount of canned soup on hand, for instance. I was out  of that and bought five cans instead of two. I bought more frozen vegetables even though my supply hasn't gotten down as low as it would usually be before I bought more. I picked up some extra bottled water. I had some hand sanitizer but checked anyway and both stores I went to were completely out.  I picked up some more bar soup and Lysol wipes, even though we have a moderate amount already. That's about it. I don't think preparing is crazy at all. Just so long as people aren't gobbling up all the supplies so there's none for anyone else.

 

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4 hours ago, deangold said:

Unfortunately, our profit driven insurance industry will not let you have a stockpile for emergencies. 

Ah, you're the person I should have replied to with the comment I made on drug refills. I missed this when I read through the thread.

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8 hours ago, deangold said:

Unfortunately, our profit driven insurance industry will not let you have a stockpile for emergencies. 

This makes me insane. I take thyroid meds. I NEED them. But no, I can't refill until I am almost out. And so, vacations require groveling to the insurance company to get the refills a week early. And emergencies don't exist in their world.

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I don't think prepping for healthcare or environmental issues these days is loonie behavior. 

Last weekend, we did a bit more than the regular Sunday shopping which amounted to adding on our weekly, bi-weekly and monthly trips, since that is how we prioritize, i.e. fresh fruits, vegetables, & meats; soups & breads; and household supplies such as toliet paper & towel paper, etc...Probably maxed out those categories for 3-4 weeks with frozen items.  

Being prudent or prepared seems like simply a good safety precaution. 

Simply washing your hands over the course of the day five times can reduce respiratory illnesses 45%. 

One modern day era thing most people forget is to clean their cellphones. Studies have shown they are a major problem with accumulating germs. 

 

 

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I work for an organization that deals with disaster response and recovery.  A few months before coronavirus was a thing, someone asked the CEO at a staff meeting what their biggest fear was.  I was expecting something about upcoming financial planning, expenses, board meetings, etc.  The response was that Americans as a whole are woefully unprepared for a disaster or other disruption to our daily lives.  Most people don't have enough prescription drugs, only have a few days worth of food, drive on an empty tank of gas, etc.

We should all try to keep a week or two of food and water on hand.  If possible, extra prescription drugs.  Ask ourselves, what could I not live without for a week, and then stock up on that.  There's a big difference between being a star on next season's doomsday prep show and being smart about protecting yourself and your family.

I have small kids so we have formula, baby foods, kids medicines, diapers, etc.  Paid out of pocket for 30 days of a medication that is required daily to sustain life (I realize not everyone can do that, its not cheap).  Food that we would normally eat anyway, but kept in case its needed for a few months.  Then we eat it and restock.  

Of course I also keep at least three cases of spare wine on hand at all times.  Think of it as cellaring.  🙂

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Question, are you prepping to avoid getting the virus or are you prepping to not spread the virus after you get it?   If you're prepping for the former, you need to stock up and lock yourself in now.  If you're prepping for the latter, then you're just being a nice human being, but you can get groceries delivered these days.  

I have a few cans of soup.  

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2 hours ago, Ericandblueboy said:

you can get groceries delivered these days.  

In case of a bad outbreak, there might be a shortage of delivery service drivers. 

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You can live for weeks without food.  Lose some weight in the process.

ETA - Didn’t mean to be snarky but it creeps in after drinks.

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9 hours ago, Ericandblueboy said:

Question, are you prepping to avoid getting the virus or are you prepping to not spread the virus after you get it?   If you're prepping for the former, you need to stock up and lock yourself in now.  If you're prepping for the latter, then you're just being a nice human being, but you can get groceries delivered these days.  

I have a few cans of soup.  

My point was more that we should all be ready for a disruption in our daily lives for a few days or weeks. 

6 hours ago, Ericandblueboy said:

You can live for weeks without food.  Lose some weight in the process.

I’m not sure how my kid would do without formula and I’m very sure how my wife would do without medicine, but you do you.

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I went to a big event in Fairfax this past weekend.  It was REALLY interesting to see how people did.  Some people were fist bumping, some waving without offering a hand. Some people were still shaking hands, and some still hugging.  But it was funny to see people gauge their level of worry and level of acquaintance in such fashion.  The attendance was certainly down from a normal year, still a big event, but... 

I feel bad for people like my SIL with a depressed immune system, and other SIL who literally just had a baby.  They are running up against shortages of things like hand sanitizer, rationing at Costco, etc.  They are people who have a lot more reason to worry.  My one SIL won't have to worry about an unstocked freezer luckily!  

I do think people though have so much more in their pantry that they just don't use, and waste so much food in general, that having to cook down some pantry reserves might end up teaching them a thing or two.  When we were moving and I cooked down my pantry and freezer, we had a ton of meals.  Maybe a bit interesting in pairings, I did a lot of searching on pinterest with several ingredients to see what they came up with.  But my Mom says I live like I survived the great depression- I really am not cool with food waste. 

I don't think it is bad per se to prepare for a disaster, especially having some non-perishables, being smart about medication refills, etc.  But I think there is also a whole lot of unneccessary paranoia right now in odd ways that are affecting people/business who really need the supplies.  And I think Americans aren't good at also knowing how to preserve food so that the food they buy doesn't get wasted when the disaster doesn't happen or happens at a later time then they foresaw.  Or knowing how to buy and cook the right types of food for that type of preparedness.  I foresee people having huge amounts of unused hand santiizer and rice for the next year.  

I think we have forgotten a lot of things that our past generations learned during the depression/war effort that would help in times of emergency and otherwise. 

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For anyone who still thinks this is just a bad flu.

 

 

This is from one of the best prepared places in the world, in terms of free access to quality healthcare and social cohesion.  Remember that we live in the land of gig workers and hospital balance billing.

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