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I’ve been making my own butter for a few months now. It is really easy to do. You do need to make sure you wash the butter to get out the whey or it will go rancid fairly quickly. Salting the butter also helps preserve it.

As for cream, I have used the fresh local organic stuff from the TPSS Co-op and Whole Foods but have also used the ultra-pasteurized stuff from Safeway. I’ve gotten fine buttery results from every kind of cream I’ve used.

The butter from fresh local organic cream is richer and has a more unique flavor, as you would expect, and the Safeway cream ends up tasting pretty much like Safeway butter.

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I would use the Lewes Dairy or Trickling Springs cream that you can get around town. What's your plan? Are you going to do it with your Kitchenaid mixer? That's what I've used. There is also the old "put it in a Mason jar and shake the hell out of it" method, too.
I thought you could do this in a food processor as well. That would eliminate the need to put plastic wrap over the mixer; but, does it work?
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My husband has accidentally overwhipped cream to the point of creating something like butter. Could you do this on purpose to make butter?

That is how it is made. Whip cream to the butter stage, knead out the rest of the whey, shape and store.

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That is how it is made. Whip cream to the butter stage, knead out the rest of the whey, shape and store.

You can also agitate it at a slower speed for a much longer time, to approximate the speed of an old-fashioned butter churn--it seems like it takes forever, though. And it used to. But that's not an option for Al Dente, who is going to be much too busy making his own homemade water. If you use the Kitchenaid at low speed, you can do other things at the same time, like have a loom set up where you can weave your own dishcloths. Hey, c'mon Al--this stuff is a lot of fun for some folks, even though you'd much rather we buy it from WF.

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You can also agitate it at a slower speed for a much longer time, to approximate the speed of an old-fashioned butter churn--it seems like it takes forever, though. And it used to. But that's not an option for Al Dente, who is going to be much too busy making his own homemade water. If you use the Kitchenaid at low speed, you can do other things at the same time, like have a loom set up where you can weave your own dishcloths. Hey, c'mon Al--this stuff is a lot of fun for some folks, even though you'd much rather we buy it from WF.

Smuggle yaks in from Mongolia for butter for all I care. I just think it's amusing the lengths some of us are willing to go to. I totally understand this urge, by the way, I'm just throwing a little satire at ya.

I just had an idea. Smuggle the yaks over here, attach their udders to one of those paint-can-shaker thingies for a few minutes, and voila!

Budder straight from the udder!

My genius scares me sometimes... :angry:

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I am going to try to make butter two different ways with my 7 yo (Katie). Way one is the Mason Jar. Way two is the mixer on low, as per the recent article in the NYT and other internet sites. This is probably a one time thing, but still I am intrested in the results and the method. The last good butter I had was at Eve and after asking the source found it was housemade. I want to try to duplicate that taste.

http://www.donrockwell.com/index.php?showt...8&hl=butter#

You people have too much time on your hands...

:angry:

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In the name of sanity make sure you use a smaller jar when shaking it up. The last time I did this, as a project for my students, we used a variety of jars and the baby food jar, which was most successfull, took at least 30 minutes of constant shaking by an adult before we got anything usable. And be prepared to do the majority of the shaking. Unless your daughter has arm muscles made of steal, there is a good chance she will be bored and tired within the first five minutes or so. It's a fun project, but one of those where the adults end up doing most of the work.

We also wrapped a dish towel around the jar so if it broke the shards of glass didn't splatter everywhere.

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