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Caldera Beers


1000yregg
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Had beers with a friend of mine from Portland who packed 2 cases of beers from Caldera Brewing.

They are a microbrewery that uses aluminum cans for packing their brews.

We had their I.P.A. and Pale Ale, and while I was skeptical at first, I must admint they were damn fine. I particularly enjoyed the IPA.

Too bad you can only get these beers in Oregon. They offer internet ordering, but it's not cheap.

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Oskar Blues is another microbrewery that is canning (Old Chub, Dale's Pale), and I've heard rumblings of a few other places around the country that are starting to do this. Sly Fox cans their Pikeland Pils, and it is fantastic. I say bring it on. Cheaper and more lightweight than glass, less risk of damage from light (and possibly oxygen, although that seems to be still in debate), and the ever-surprising sensation of drinking something from a can and having it taste good.

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Cheaper and more lightweight than glass, less risk of damage from light (and possibly oxygen, although that seems to be still in debate)

Yeah, I'd be skeptical too. Crown-capped glass is easily good for years and years (now that they use synthetic seals, and not the cork liners in use 30 years ago) whereas even today canned beverages still seem to lose significant carbonation within 18-24 months. Except for Guinness, probably because of the nitrogen. I'm not going to count the cases of Old Coke that we stashed in 1985 that were dead flat by 1987.

How IS that Dale's Pale? They had it at MacArthur last weekend, along with Old Chub, but I'd already reached my (tiny) shopping quota of beers to taste...and Gubeen loaded up on their latest Allagash Curieux clearance.

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Yeah, I'd be skeptical too. Crown-capped glass is easily good for years and years (now that they use synthetic seals, and not the cork liners in use 30 years ago) whereas even today canned beverages still seem to lose significant carbonation within 18-24 months. Except for Guinness, probably because of the nitrogen. I'm not going to count the cases of Old Coke that we stashed in 1985 that were dead flat by 1987.

How IS that Dale's Pale? They had it at MacArthur last weekend, along with Old Chub, but I'd already reached my (tiny) shopping quota of beers to taste...and Gubeen loaded up on their latest Allagash Curieux clearance.

There are a variety of random mentions of oxygen levels in cans to be found on the internet, none with unbiased, conclusive answers either way. This is an interesting read, and it's one of the few things I've read that has semi-scientific references to back up the "our O2 levels are ok in cans" assertion. Not sure there's any data on CO2 preservation, though. My guess is that glass is still the way to go for long-term storage, but cans are at least as good at minimizing oxidation early in the life of the beer.

I actually haven't ever had Dale's Pale while sober, but I remember quite enjoying it when hammered a few months back. Others may be able to comment further.

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I actually haven't ever had Dale's Pale while sober, but I remember quite enjoying it when hammered a few months back. Others may be able to comment further.

I'd call it a pale ale in the British vein in that it's more malt-centric than the typical American pale ale. It's quite good. It's very similar to Stone's Pale Ale if you've had that.

As for the oxidation problems with canned beers, I can't think of any canned beer that I would want to cellar. They are pretty much all meant to be drunk now. An 18-24 month window is more than adequate.

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