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To Whom Are You Drinking Right Now?


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To my partner's father, who died peacefully but completely unexpectedly Wednesday. He was a relentless optimist who loved seafood and manning the grill and who married the girl (46 years ago) who hate

To Texas State Senator Wendy Davis, who showed us what a filibuster should look like.

I'm resting my aching feet and raising a glass or 6 to all those others on the Mall today.  What a turnout!  What a scene!

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Max Scherzer.  Damn, I thought I was going to see a no hitter today.  He pitched super well.  The first walk he gave up near the beginning of the game, I said: "There goes the perfect game," which was then echoed by the man keeping score near me. I could tell early that it could be a no hitter.  He just had everything today.  Seriously awesome stuff he had.  He's just an amazing fierce competitor.

Here's to you, Max and the Nats, who played some fabulous defense behind you.  Our second string team is really solid.

While I'm at it, here's to next year!

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WashPost game-time discussion thread among us die hard fans:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/nationals-journal/wp/2015/10/03/nationals-mets-discussion-thread-game-161/

Beat writer's take:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/matt-williams-says-uncertainty-is-not-going-to-be-a-distraction-anymore/2015/10/03/194b503c-6a09-11e5-9223-70cb36460919_story.html

Sports writers. You've been rubbing it in gleefully and saying these games since we lost the pennant are meaningless. Don't agree. If YOU can't find meaning, do what we fans do: Create Meaning!

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I watched him cook on local TV and he always seemed like he was so full of love and happiness. He is going to be missed. He was such a force in promoting Cajun and Creole food and culture. RIP, big guy! I know that wherever you are now, there is a pot of gumbo bubbling away and a big iron skillet of roux waiting to be turned into something delicious.

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I watched him cook on local TV and he always seemed like he was so full of love and happiness. He is going to be missed. He was such a force in promoting Cajun and Creole food and culture. RIP, big guy! I know that wherever you are now, there is a pot of gumbo bubbling away and a big iron skillet of roux waiting to be turned into something delicious.

His Prudhomme Family Cookbook is like the Bible in our house! And we had him autograph Louisiana Kitchen when he came to the Folklife Festival.

"Good cooking. Good eating. Good loving!" was his message. Nobody can argue with that!

There's also a tribute to Prudhomme here.

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This week I am drinking to my brother-in-law, David Barzelay, whose restaurant, Lazy Bear, earned a Michelin star in its first year of eligibility.  So proud!

I saw that! Truly amazing.

For those of you who don't know the history, a few short years ago David was in law school in DC and just cooking on the side as I hobby, now he's a rock star! My claim to fame (or my 1 foot from stardom moment) was sitting next to him at the original Minibar and being entertained by him and the chefs holding a chemistry and physics class in front of us as they discussed the very specific requirements to create certain dishes.

Congrats to all of you!

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To Pat and cheezepowder, whose silent contributions to this community are so vast that they are irreplaceable.

Please send them a note of thanks - just a brief PM acknowledging what they do. I understand you don't *know* what they do, but they are the motors that keep this vehicle running. cheezepowder, with her incredible lists of restaurant openings and closures - this must surely be the most comprehensive list ever attempted for any city in the world; and Pat, with her unshakable diligence and consistency which she uses to validate members. Both are selfless, trustworthy, giving, and applying all their efforts exclusively so that others may enjoy this website. They refuse to step forward and be acknowledged for their actions, and silently work in the background, making the impossible look simple.

If you appreciate how effortlessly this website runs, please write them and say so (just click on their names), and please don't assume other people will do it, because that's usually not the case.

Thank you very much, both of you! <Clink!>

Rocks

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To Rob Walker, of WAMU's Big Broadcast, who passed away this morning.  His final broadcast aired lat night -- I'm glad we violated tradition and listed to it over dinner.

And to Mrs. B, who loved The Big Broadcast and who died three years ago Saturday.

Christmas Eve will not be the same.

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To Rob Walker, of WAMU's Big Broadcast, who passed away this morning.  His final broadcast aired lat night -- I'm glad we violated tradition and listed to it over dinner.

And to Mrs. B, who loved The Big Broadcast and who died three years ago Saturday.

Christmas Eve will not be the same.

I hadn't heard. Ed (I write not to correct you, but his name was Ed) Walker was probably the greatest-ever figure in Washington, DC, radio. He was practically a force of nature, and a fixture on a succession of stations since the 1950s. A part of my life for most of it, associated first and last with American University, my long-time employer and alma mater. I raise my glass in celebration of his long, illustrious career. An example to us all.

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I feel I must add a salute to that other great giant of Washington radio, Felix Grant, who I have to say changed my life. I doubt I'd ever have surrendered so completely to jazz if it hadn't been for Felix Grant, who died in October of 1993. Like Ed Walker, Felix Grant had a nearly perfect radio voice, and he also had the most impeccable taste in music that any mortal ever possessed. I raise this possibly over-raised glass to Felix Grant as well.

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John Cardoza - My sweeties Debate Coach, mentor, and patriarch of the tribe.  Diagnosed with liver cancer in December he passed last night - over the last 4 weeks many of his former students flew in to Stockton Calif to say their goodbyes.  He was always the one to turn to for travel advice for all over the world.  He will be missed by many.

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To first dates where the person isn't a murderer,

you don't have to worry about whether or not to kiss them goodnight,

and you know this was not the last date.

And to filling people in on years of high school drama.

To the third anniversary of first dates,

which we celebrated without even realizing.

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To first dates where the person isn't a murderer,

you don't have to worry about whether or not to kiss them goodnight,

and you know this was not the last date.

And to filling people in on years of high school drama.

To the third anniversary of first dates,

which we celebrated without even realizing.

That must have been one hell of a first date considering you didn't get around to posting about it for two days. :lol:

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Tonight I'm raising a glass to...me! For having successfully defended my dissertation earlier today. Yay! Don, please change my screen name to Dr. Delicious :P

Congratulations!

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To Pat Conroy an author whose books I relished and devoured.  On Saturday I will toast Conroy, my favorite American author, the more modern reincarnation of Thomas Wolfe.  His prose was lush, vivid, colorful.  I visited the lowland coastal areas simply because of his writings.  His was the only book signing I ever attended (other than that of a relative)....and to my disappointment he was ill and had to cancel.

Wonderful reading that grabbed my attention for hours and hours.   And what torturous stories.   Do you think your childhood was tough???   Read his books.

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RIP Nancy Reagan.  Okay, so I probably won't drink to her...but I did in the past.  In the 80's I got married in the old Ritz Carlton at 21st and Mass.  Its now The Fairfax Hotel on Embassy Row.  The old Ritz had a well known "haunt' The Jockey Club, which was "the" preferred hangout for Mrs. Reagan and other big shots.  I "hung out" there over the weekend I got married; invited some of my other "low life friends"--made them dress up.  We downed a few drinks, toasted Mrs. Reagan who never showed while we were there.   So fancy, so formal, so "old worldish".   Not my cup of tea.

Here is to you, Mrs Reagan.   You had a long life, a great marriage, and you made the term "Just say No" famous.  As far as I know...it is not a guarantee to work.   Sorry we didn't get to meet that weekend.  I would have been respectful. (can't say the same for my friends).

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RIP Nancy Reagan.  Okay, so I probably won't drink to her...but I did in the past.  In the 80's I got married in the old Ritz Carlton at 21st and Mass.  Its now The Fairfax Hotel on Embassy Row.  The old Ritz had a well known "haunt' The Jockey Club, which was "the" preferred hangout for Mrs. Reagan and other big shots.

Long before the hotel at 21st and Mass was a Ritz Carlton, it was the Fairfax Hotel, from its opening in 1927 until a renovation and rebranding as a Ritz Carlton in 1982. Al Gore grew up there. His father, Senator Albert Gore Sr., was a cousin of the long time owner, also a Gore.

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Glass up to Nancy Reagan as well.  A couple you knew adored each other, but also a woman who publicly dealt with the near-death of her husband and then cared for him for 10 years as he succumbed to Alzheimer's. 

Yep, a great lady - it's hard to believe she's no longer with us.

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To Johan Cruyff, legendary Dutch soccer player.  Got to see him at the end of his career when he played in the US.  One could still see his skills, even if he wasn't dominant.  I'll have a pop to his memory later this evening.  I believe he was one of the originators of the tiki taka style that Spain used so successfully over the more recent past.  

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To Johan Cruyff, legendary Dutch soccer player.  Got to see him at the end of his career when he played in the US.  One could still see his skills, even if he wasn't dominant.  I'll have a pop to his memory later this evening.  I believe he was one of the originators of the tiki taka style that Spain used so successfully over the more recent past.  

Tiki-taka certainly uses the possession style that Cruyff popularized, but he was famous while at Ajax for "total football" (which he didn't invent, but he gets full credit for spreading to the modern game). Prior to this, positions were very rigid - you had attackers, midfielders, and defenders. In total football, the positions are more fluid, and the current influence can be seen in teams using outside defenders as flank players to support the offense.

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