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Dupont Circle FreshFarm Market - 20th St. & Massachusetts Avenue NW


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The staff has turned over since I was involved with FFM, but looking at their website- the correct person to contact is Nony Dutton (Director of Markets and Programs) Nony@freshfarm.org

Dupont today:

Dandelion greens

Radicchio Treviso--both from Heinz at Next Step, the raddichio was first of this type I've seen around

Golden cherry tomatoes

Zucchini with blossoms attached--from New Morning; asked for the squash last week

Lavender eggplants

Peaches & nectarines--Eli's

Sorrel-- :unsure: gorgeous!!!! from "The Greens Lady" 1st time. Pray the heat doesn't do them in this week and RUN to her buckets next week if you love this stuff as much as I do.

NB The private chef who did the demo before Nina Planck spoke was one of the best I've seen: Tania Hayek, www.nourishingyou.com. While she trained at a CA "alternative" cooking school that specializes in raw food, she made a frittata with green onions, basil, garlic, prosciutto, cream and cheese that really promoted the things the market offers. Her teaching style was perfectly suited for her audience, the smells were fantastic...

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Dupont today was a mob scene. Why aren't all these people at the beach? :) Picked up Toigo peaches, apricots, plums, sungold cherry tomatoes, and corn. Also mesclun, tiny chioggia beets, basil. thyme, heirloom tomatoes, and a dozen eggs.

Sunnyside has a sign up for whole chickens, preorder only. I may do that next week.

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Dupont today was a mob scene. Why aren't all these people at the beach? :)

I must have missed you in the crowd. I did have a nice chat with Mrs. Giantshrimp, who, it turns out, lived on my street when she was a teenager. Small world.

Bev Eggleston overslept and hadn't made it to the market when it opened, so I did all my other shopping and swung back at around 9:45 when they were setting up his booth. I overheard a man saying that he was there to buy meat for the first time, because he had read Michael Pollan's book. I wish Bev a lot of success--I just hope that demand doesn't so overwhelm supply, that those of us who have been customers from the get-go are cut off. I did get a cute little chicken, but things have been seeming slimmer there for the past few weeks. Summer doldrums, I hope?

Elsewhere in the market, I got Aracauna eggs, organic beans and Ice Queen corn, heirloom tomatoes, Blue Ridge mozzarella, munchkin potatoes, W. VA peaches (of the various peaches on offer this morning, I thought they were the most flavorful) basil, and sunflower-flaxseed bread for breakfast toast.

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Was in the neighborhood yesterday morning and stopped at the Dupont Market. Very crowded at 10am. Picked up a few items. Highlights were the garlic from the very nice garlic ladies and Yo Fresh with honey from Blue Ridge Dairy. My first time trying it and was very, very pleased.

The superstar of the morning was pastries from Bonaparte. I don't think it's gotten very much attention on this thread (at least in my brief search,) and it was really fantastic. Beautifully dark croissaints and palmiers got my attention first. Also picked up a couple almond croissaints and an apple tartlet of some sort. Everything was really fresh and flakey. DC is not known for great pastries, in particular farmers markets are not known for great pastries, but Bonaparte was a real find. I didn't even get to the breads and the quiche - next time. I might be making Dupont market a regular trip because of it.

I'm finding myself already thinking about what I want next weekend.... yum.

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At Dupont Market last Sunday i grabbed some great sun-dried tomato ravioli from Smith Meadows and some great smoked mozarella from blue ridge(?)-it's really smokey and a little goes a long way-in fact it lasted all week-i also grabbed a crabcake from the crabcake guy, and it was excellent. I had to prepare everything in a microwave at work, and each item really stood up. The baguette from Bonaparte was nice and yeasty, but the flan thing and the quiche were pretty bland. 100% rec...Merlot-blueberry jam-just don't eat it for breakfast unless you don't mind a little morning buzz.

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At Dupont this morning Sunnyside had Silver Queen corn which looked very good so I picked up a dozen for $5. Good deal.

The West Virginia stand (can't think of the name) was out of corn by the time we got there, a little after 11, but still had plenty of peaches. Tiogo had no corn, but a sign that read "corn next week". I got a watermelon instead.

I also picked up a package of morning sausage from Ecofriendly. The woman there mentioned that next week they will have whole chickens.

And for people like me who like Dupont even more because it allows dogs, they will no longer. Apparently there was a nasty dog fight last week, and added to other folks complaining about leash tripping and dog peeing, it sealed the deal. No dogs allowed. Now, that definitely covers the private property portion of the market, but the street might be another deal since it encompasses public sidewalks in a residential area.

So, leave the pooch at home, lest you have nasty glares directed at you like we did today :)

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And for people like me who like Dupont even more because it allows dogs, they will no longer. Apparently there was a nasty dog fight last week, and added to other folks complaining about leash tripping and dog peeing, it sealed the deal. No dogs allowed. Now, that definitely covers the private property portion of the market, but the street might be another deal since it encompasses public sidewalks in a residential area.

So, leave the pooch at home, lest you have nasty glares directed at you like we did today :)

Finally! I so prefer Takoma and Arlington which have banned dogs for ages... (Not that I dislike dogs but I'm severely allergic and the manners of many of the owners at the Dupont Market leaves much to be desired!)

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And for people like me who like Dupont even more because it allows dogs, they will no longer. Apparently there was a nasty dog fight last week, and added to other folks complaining about leash tripping and dog peeing, it sealed the deal. No dogs allowed. Now, that definitely covers the private property portion of the market, but the street might be another deal since it encompasses public sidewalks in a residential area.

So, leave the pooch at home, lest you have nasty glares directed at you like we did today :)

public sentiment was running heavily pro-fido during the opening hour of the market yesterday, and there were rumblings that it may be doggie demonstration time. pooches will surround the block. i like the dogs, especially the pugs, but mrs. shrimp dislikes them going for our bags and, coming from a home where dogs rule, reminds us all that they can mark a box of produce in a flash. there is a lot of excitement at the market, where it can be difficult even for us humans to remain calm submissive.

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At the Dupont Circle Market ... what was it reminding me of ... a rugby scrum? I did get some feta cheese

with sundried tomato a few weeks ago ... very nice with orzo and olive oil. The feta was from the Blue

Highland Dairy at the north end of the market ... it has its devotees.

I am not good with crowds, so I sometimes feel, in the PNC Bank parking lot part of the market, that I am

about to be tied up with a dog leash, then run over by a fleet of baby strollers.

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New at the Dupont Market yesterday:

Chef Ris Lacoste, formerly of 1789, was weighing peaches and making change behind the counter at Toigo yesterday. Brief chat--she is doing some private chef-ing and enjoying life.

Also, a brief flurry of excitement at Eco-Friendly as Tom, the Dupont security guy, and Bruce, who works the booth for Bev Eggleston, wrestled with a homeless guy who'd reached through the fence behind the booth and grabbed some cash. Tom and Bruce struggled to get the guy handcuffed to the fence, while Stacy, who also works for Bev, called the cops. My friend Marty L., who teaches law at Georgetown (constitutional, not criminal) was also watching this drama unfold. He wondered if it was legal for them to handcuff the guy. I said even if it wasn't, the homeless guy would tell his friends what had happened to him and it might serve as a disincentive to others trying to steal from the vendors at the market. Marty agreed that it was a disincentive--he now had absolutely no desire to steal money from Eco-Friendly foods.

:)

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The Dupont Market has grown to be too popular to remain as is, and needs to expand onto another block.

Expanding onto the other side of Q Street would be problematic because of through traffic on Q. Too bad they can't take over that little triangular park. That'd be a great place to have prepared food for sale. They've already started expanding alongside the bank on Mass Ave., where Bonaparte Bakery is. There certainly could be a few more vendors there.

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I'd like to see Dupont add another hour at either the begining or the end (my preference) to relieve some of the pressure.

That said, I'm not sure how often we'll be getting down there now that we live in Gaithersburg.

On the other hand, I like Reid's produce more than anyone else's that I've found so I guess I'll be schelpping down there when I can..

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Adding another hour on to the begining probably isn't too realistic. Stands start setting up at 7am for the 9am opening and sometimes 2 hours is barely enough. Spreading further down Mass. Ave is probably the most realistic option.

I agree though, they have to do something. Shopping there is losing its appeal. I've tried different hours and it is always too crowded. I give the farmers credit though, most lines move at a nice pace.

Other than Shoebox Oven, of course, what do you think is missing or needed?

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Hmm. Been to a lot of markets a lot more crowded than Dupont. I think they do a fine job. Maybe they should be more like Safeway?
The difference between the Dupont market and, say, the market in Aix-en-Provence (one very crowded market that I am sure you've been to) is that it's much less exciting being jostled while buying your Toigo corn. :)

Actually, the problem would be solved if everyone would just stay away until 10. That way I can get the best stuff.

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Are you people really up at 9 am on a Sunday? Seriously? Voluntarily? When most normal people are stuck with head down the toilet? Don't think I ever woke up before 9 am on Sunday voluntarily. Oh goody.

I'm with Nadya on this one. If we're proposing adding an extra hour, it should be to stay open til 2pm, so I have a chance of making it on any given hungover Sunday.

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Are you people really up at 9 am on a Sunday? Seriously? Voluntarily? When most normal people are stuck with head down the toilet? Don't think I ever woke up before 9 am on Sunday voluntarily. Oh goody.

For us breeders, who spend hundreds of mornings a year waking up at 6:30 and car-pooling the kids to school, 9AM is the moral equivalent of noon. Plus, if you don't pull yourself out of bed in time, all the good tomatoes are gone. Anyone who can't shop with dry heaves and a headache the size of Uzbekistan is a wuss. Plus, the Bloody Marys at Trio are cheap,as long as you're in the 'hood.

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The Dupont Market has grown to be too popular to remain as is, and needs to expand onto another block.
There is a third way to stretch Dupont Market's capacity besides adding hours or expanding down the block (out on a sidewalk where dogs are still permitted).

I heard a cool story on pubic radio this morning. Farmers Market Goes Online describes how New Hampshire shoppers are able to preorder online and then on market day only have to hit the pick-up booth instead of the jammed marketplace.

AMY QUINTON: Jeanie Meisner anxiously waits for a bag filled with her order of fresh organic fruits, vegetables, and breads at the farmer's market in Plymouth, New Hampshire. She placed her order three days ago on a website called Local Foods Plymouth, and now she's picking up her order at their booth at the farmer's market.

The products come from 12 different farms around the state, but now it's all packed and ready for her to take home.

The Local Foods Plymouth website is active for incoming orders on Tuesdays (so farmers get orders Wednesday) for Thursday market. It a neat site because you can see what's available "up North."

If this was adopted at the larger markets run by Farm Fresh, arrival times and shopper denisty woundn't be such an issue.

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Dupont Circle Farmer's Market today ... less crowded than those days during the Summer. Got a tat soi,

even though I have no idea what to do with it. They looked so beautiful. And some green beans.

Many varieties of apples ... I will have to study up on the varieties, since the little description cards don't

help much, especially since I, perversely, find a Granny Smith apple good eating just as it is.

Turnips, beets, celeriac ... they are here, arriving a few more each week. I long for root vegetables now,

a few treasures on a cold day. When I was a kid, my father would tell me how, growing up in South

Dakota, the last months of winter, the only vegetable was parsnips, day after day. Maybe that is why

parsnips (and turnips) were rare at our house.

These beautiful days of Fall will not last long ... no, I should not have even said that.

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despite abundant layers of clothing, many of the girls were shivering at their stands by the time the dupont market opened yesterday. and speaking of ripe tomatoes, three successive nights of frost to the north and west may have brought this season's crop to an early demise, but not to the east. and speaking of heinz, bags of malabar spinach were on sale, my favorite spinach, and the best spinach substitute for the phobic, since, if i have this right, and i just looked it up, it isn't really spinach at all.

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I got to Dupont too late for the apple cinammon cider at Reid's though I did score both pear and apple-cherry.

I bought bartlett's there too--didn't see them at Toigo.

The lines in front of Atwaters are getting crazy--plus the traffic flow with the crabcake guy is just plain bad. But they had the rosemary italian loaf so what do I have to truly complain about?

The beets looked wonderful everywhere and I just didn't have the courage to buy them this week. Maybe next time.

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The Silver Spring market had a pork vendor that I hadn't seen before. Cedarbrook Farms raises Tamworth pigs, a heritage breed, and they were offering ground pork, pig's feet, bacon, sausage, scrapple, and assorted other things. They will be at the Dupont Circle market starting tomorrow.

Cedarbrook Farms has been in the "winter market" at Dupont for a couple of years-- and the powers that be have made room for them a few times during this past summer, as well.

Also: Fabio Trabocchi will be at the Dupont Market next week, at 11 to do a cooking demonstration and book signing. Bernie didn't know what he was planning to prepare for the demo, but whatever it is, it's gotta be interesting!

Toigo had quinces again today. Mark says he has about 50 bushels left, so they'll probably make another appearance or two. I'm doing another batch of membrillo this week. Last week's batch turned out really well, and a lot of it got eaten. This is supposed to last for a few months!

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Did anyone get to sample Fabio's risotto and chestnut soup demo on Sunday? I saw him wandering the market in his chef's whites then noticed that he was the guest chef for the 11:00 tasting. Unfortunately this was at 10:40 or so and I had to run.

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PAELLA MADE BY SPANISH CHEFS AT DUPONT CIRCLE ON SUNDAY

"Chefs Mari Carmen and Lola Velez of La Sirena in Alicante, Spain, will prepare a GIANT PAELLA at the Dupont Market this Sunday, Feb. 11. The Velez sisters are participating in Jaleo's 5th Annual Paella Festival from Feb. 12-25. During the Festival, patrons of Jaleo will taste specials based on recipes of Mari and Lola. We are grateful to Jose Andres for bringing these talented chefs and the GIANT PAELLA to Dupont! So, bundle up and come on down! The setup for GIANT PAELLA starts at 10 am and samples should be ready by 11 am." --FreshFarm Markets

You would not believe how many pages I had to search to find this dormant thread. I haven't been volunteering for over a month, but I just might borrow a pair of fingerless gloves.

If you decide to drop by, please note that the winter market begins at 10 am when the chefs start. Food goes very fast when there's a special event like this, so the paella might be gone by 11:15 if things conform to scheduled plans. (It might be hard to distinguish ice cycles from rice at 11:17 anyway.)

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I didn't get to taste the giant paella last week-- I was going to stick around for it, but by 10 minutes to 11, they were still trying to level up the supporting structure (it was a HUGE pan, maybe 6 feet in diameter), and any cooking was still a long ways off. It was too cold to hang around. Latecomers to the market might have gotten a taste, but the best stuff sells out quickly, so I like to get there early.

There are quite a few more vendors this winter than last, when the entire market was in the parking lot. Heinz was there last week, selling greenhouse-grown chard and some sweet potatoes, but he wasn't there this week. Adam and Eli's father has a big stand, selling soups, stews, pies and Armenian flatbread.

I got frisee, escarole and eggs from Sunnyside Organics and kale from the other Sunnyside.

Bev Eggleston is going to have some extra-dry aged steaks at Eco-Friendly next week (see my post today in the Calotte thread for specifics). I got chicken backs, necks and feet today for making stock. And a chuck blade steak for braising.

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A number of vendors chickened out this morning at Dupont. Including Sunnyside Organics, where I had planned to buy a chicken. Eco Friendly was among the missing, so no aged calotte or anything else from them today. I did get some beautiful brioches at Bonaparte, which were wonderful with homemade sour cherry preserves and cappucinos when I made it home through the snow. And I have some beets roasting in the oven. And some ground lamb for merguez meatballs in a day or two.

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Started volunteering at the Dupont market again yesterday. Slim pickings for a while more and looked the other way when I noticed venders selling hot-house tomatoes along with some of the plants that grow nicely indoors.

Still, there was tender spinach in addition to what is always best at the market anyway: Mitsu and its apple friends all daring Heather to pick one up and take a bite. Lots of cider, winter squash, broccoli, eggs, sour cream, slabs that became meat only four days prior.

John, the Market Master, said he'd been out planting fava beans on Heinz's farm yesterday.

Marcus at Spring Valley Farm said it will be some time before he will be gathering ramps. Late April? May?

At Safeway, the notorious one in Adams-Morgan, I picked up two pounds of asparagus from California since it was going for an outrageous price of only 99 cents a pound and it looked as good as supermarket asparagus ever gets. Same exact stuff that Whole Foods was selling for quite a bit more. Figured it would be fine as a light soup with the stock I was planning to simmer that evening.

However, I agree with a fellow-marketeer who said asparagus is one of those things that is virtually a different food when you buy it at the market. The intense flavor... I'm all for fully cooked green vegetables, but sauteed until tender, but still crisp...

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Just a reminder that the market at Dupont Circle will resume its regular hours this upcoming Sunday, opening once more at 9 am so Zora can dash in to snatch some of those first signs of the new season that arrive in modest increments.

RJ Cooper of Vidalia should be setting up for a Chef's demonstration to begin at 11 PM.

Here's more info from last week's email:

April 1: Dupont Market opens at 9 am and we welcome back Arbec Orchids (weather permitting), Country Pleasures Farm, Mount Harmony, Next Step Produce*, Reid's Orchard, and Wollam Gardens. Solitude will also be at market on April 1. New Morning Farm and Wheatland Vegetable Farms will join us a bit later in the spring. Endless Summer Harvest will continue to be at the Dupont market through the month of May.

April 4: Foggy Bottom Market opens at 2:30 pm (NEW start time!) and ends at 7 pm. Producers at market include Bonaparte Breads, D&S Farm, Endless Summer Harvest, Firefly Farm, Keswick Creamery, Lynnvale Studios, Quaker Valley Orchard, Smith Meadows Farm and Sunnyside Farm & Orchard. Long Meadow Farm will return once it warms up in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia!

April 5: Penn Quarter Market returns for its fifth season; market hours are 3pm to 7pm. Producers include: Anchor Nursery, Black Rock Orchard, Blue Ridge Dairy, Chapel's Creamery, Cibola Farm, Endless Summer Harvest, Floradise Orchids, Mount Harmony, Toigo Orchards, Sunnyside Organic, WB Lanham of Ovens at Quail Creek Farm and Wollam Gardens. Sand Hill Farm, Virginia Lamb and Chris Marketplace (with incredible crabcakes!) will join us a bit later in the spring. Opening Day 'Chef at Market' is Peter Smith of PS 7's; demo is 5-6 pm.

*Heinz :o

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Just a reminder that the market at Dupont Circle will resume its regular hours this upcoming Sunday, opening once more at 9 am so Zora can dash in to snatch some of those first signs of the new season that arrive in modest increments.

Hey, some people get up early on Sunday morning to go to church. I consider it my spiritual congregation. Last week, even really early, there were long lines at many of the stands. I was waiting in one line and then going to my next vendor and yet another long line. It was starting to feel a bit like a culinary amusement park.

I looked for you--thought you were going to be there early to train volunteers.

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Heinz was selling bags of mache for $3, tender clumps of shiny leaves that were much smaller than the ones I picked up at Trader Joe's on Friday for a bit more. Next week might be the last time it's available.

The new cardoons are being moved from the hothouse this week to make up for the loss of last year's stalks. So maybe in the fall?

* * *

The chef's demo was low-key: an introduction to various types of eggs, radishes and greens, the new local vinegars being sold by Dragonfly, and a number of local cheeses, all of which went into a variety of salads. We were all grateful that the thunderstorm predicted for 11 AM never arrived.

R.J. Cooper brought a tub of egg salad to the market, to be served with fresh chives on little squares of crisp lavash dusted with spices.

AB: How might I help?

RJC: Do you know how to quenelle?

AB: :blink: No.

Didn't even know it was a verb. Thought quenelles were just these small, light mousse dumplings cooked and served in broth.

Harper, his very kind sous-chef gave me a lesson on transferring egg salad back and forth between two teaspoons with sharp, quick strokes until the glob of egg salad assumes the shape of a razer-back pig without head, legs or tail. He said "football," but you need to get the concept of the clean central ridge in there somewhere. I kept trying. I ended up with little clumpy globs, impressed by the uniform polish of his diagonally placed mixture.

The egg salad was made with mayonnaise, capers, anchovies, Dijon and chives.

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New crops, snacks and funghi supplies at Dupont on Sunday:

  • ASPARAGUS and MORELS from Spring Valley Farm
  • LEEKS from Next Step Produce (Heinz brought some last week, but lots more this time)
  • CRABCAKES from Chris Marketplace

Jaleo and Cowgirl Creamery are teaming up for the Chef Demo at 11 am to promote will the cheeses of Spain and the New World. Recipes to sample: Asparagus and Pasamontes cheese salad; Pasamontes cheese in olive oil; Endive with Valedon cheese, walnuts and orange; and Salad with oranges, dates and Valedon.

On Thursday, May 3, Jaleo and Cowgirl Creamery will host another cheese tasting and demo at the Penn Quarter location at 5 PM. Presentation also concerns Chapel Creamery's pilot project for producing raw milk cheeses in Maryland.

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At Dupont yesterday, I got:

2 bunches of asparagus for $7

A large bunch of watercress from Tree and Leaf farm (first Sunday at Dupont)

Keswick cheeses; Calverly and Quark

Bulk breakfast sausge from Eco Friendly

Also Marcela's Bakery on Mt. Vernon Ave. is selling delishious satenas at the Sat. Market in Del Ray.

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For regulars of the Dupont market on Sundays, who do you go to for meat? I stopped by this past Sunday morning to pick up a pound of bacon for a last minute brunch with friends (our moms were all traveling out of the country for Mother's Day). It tasted great, but I'd say the bacon was 90% fat (not that there's anything wrong with fat - it's just I would've bought more had I known I'd be left with only enough strips to feed 3 people).

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For regulars of the Dupont market on Sundays, who do you go to for meat? I stopped by this past Sunday morning to pick up a pound of bacon for a last minute brunch with friends (our moms were all traveling out of the country for Mother's Day). It tasted great, but I'd say the bacon was 90% fat (not that there's anything wrong with fat - it's just I would've bought more had I known I'd be left with only enough strips to feed 3 people).

If you got the bacon from Cibola (they are mainly known for buffalo but do pork, as well) you just got a bad batch -- their bacon is usually excellent, though expensive. Make sure you know if you're getting the smoked or the salt as the flavors differ significantly. They also offer excellent pork chops. I'm not much for bison, and so rarely buy it.

The lamb ladies should be back soon, as well.

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At dupont today, first Fava's from Heinz. The best I have ever had -- really long pods. By the time I figured out that it would be good to count (near the end), I counted seven beans in a pod. Cooked them up with olive oil, just a bit of panko bread crumbs, and some Parmigiano-Reggiano . yum.

Great beautiful beets today too from tree & leaf.

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There are lots of egg vendors at Dupont, and also several cheese venues beyond Keswick. (I'm not a big fan of Keswick's cheeses.) Firefly Farm--fresh, ripened and aged goat cheeses is at Dupont, and their stuff is excellent. Also Blue Ridge Dairy, who sell mozzarella, ricotta, moscarpone, and yogurt. I haven't seen English peas, but New Morning has sugar snaps and Heinz (Next Step) has favas.

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Who's going to Dupont this morning? I believe I am, despite it being Giadaless.
I was there and picked up a half flat of Toigo strawberries, a big sack of incredibly sweet sugar snap peas, and about ten pounds of favas, which should yield about a cup of puree. ;)

Sorry I missed you both today. I did see Waitman arriving as I was leaving, and we had a chance to chat for a few minutes. Also noticed Ferment Everything as his deal went down with the man at Cedarbrook Pork so that FE's pork smokin' jones could be taken care of next week. :P

The young farmers who are running their Tree and Leaf Farm stand at Wheatland Farm's stall this year had some wild serviceberries for sale. I had thought they were found only in Alaska and the Yukon Territories, but there is a Virginia varietal. It looks something like a large blueberry, but has larger seeds and a different flavor than wild blueberries. I bought some just to satisfy my curiosity, but I've not decided what to do with them yet.

As far as the favas go, I admire Heinz and I try to buy a few things from him every week (I like to spread my dollars around the market, rather than buy everything in one place), however the price he is asking for favas is way high, given the tiny amount of edible bean per pound of total weight paid for--like you say above, Heather. I figure for the same price, I could probably buy foie gras. So I'm afraid I'll have to go non-local for my favas. Heinz is going to bring some cardoons for me next week as a special favor, so I'll have to bite the bullet and pay whatever his price is. It's not as if I could buy them elsewhere, though. I have seen references to cardoon being used as a form of vegetable rennet to curdle milk for cheesemaking--something I might do some research about. Might try to make some ricotta, and then eat them together.

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Spring Valley Farm had sweet cherries today at Dupont Circle. (Hi, Monique! She was at the market, too.)

Hi Anna! I had a blast at the market today. I brought my rommate to the market, and he marveled at my process (I circled the market at least three times) and at the fact that so many of my "food friends" were there. I think he will stay at home next time!

I bought strawberries, rhubarb, yo-lite yogurt, sugar snap peas, and ground buffalo.

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I just learned that Share our Strength is using the FreshFarm Market at Dupont Circle this Sunday to participate in The Great American Bake Sale which is meant to address childhood hunger. (I will refrain from commentary, but The Food Network is a co-sponsor.)

I wish I had known about this earlier since it might have been a prime opportunity to introduce at least one DR professional and her wares directly to some of the Board members of the hosting farmers market.

The campaign has just begun and ends on the last day of August. Does anyone here know more details?

(Since I'll be putting in a couple of hours this weekend, I'll report back later if I think it might be of interest.)

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I just learned that Share our Strength is using the FreshFarm Market at Dupont Circle this Sunday to participate in The Great American Bake Sale which is meant to address childhood hunger. (I will refrain from commentary, but The Food Network is a co-sponsor.)

I wish I had known about this earlier since it might have been a prime opportunity to introduce at least one DR professional and her wares directly to some of the Board members of the hosting farmers market.

The campaign has just begun and ends on the last day of August. Does anyone here know more details?

(Since I'll be putting in a couple of hours this weekend, I'll report back later if I think it might be of interest.)

I hope to have a few of my wares through this event too. I hope the powers that be at Dupont will try them and maybe invite me into their fold. But if not, I am still very glad to be able to participate in the Great American Bake Sale--good butter for a good cause.

kb

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I did buy a container of Shoebox Oven CaneleĀ“s at the Save Our Strength bake sale at Dupont this morning, which was our Father's Day breakfast treat with cappucini.

Heinz (Next Step Produce) brought cardoons this week, after I had missed the ones he brought two weeks ago. I say missed, but it was actually that I forgot that he was bringing them for me. Not clear whether these were grown from the Umbrian cardoon seeds that Anna Blume had given him last year, but he did tell me that they were grown from Italian seeds, which unlike the American varietal have very sharp thorns along the edges of the leaves. I think he may have picked them a bit too young, since it is the stem part of the leaf that is used--the leaves themselves are discarded--and the stems were not very well developed, compared to other commercially grown cardoons I have had in years past. I bought two hefty bunches, however, and the total amount of stem, as skinny as each individual was, added up to enough to make a good sized gratin for dinner tonight. I chopped the stems, cooked them in chicken broth until tender but still a bit crunchy, made a velouteĀ“(roux-based white sauce) with a little bit of roasted garlic in it, baked the cardoons and sauce in a casserole, topped with Reggiano for about a half hour. Very delicious with leftovers from last night's blow out dinner.

I bought two containers of sour cherries at Country Pleasures, in order to make a cherry pie for my +1. This was his Father's Day present from me--his favorite kind of pie. When I pitted them out, I realized that there were not enough to make a deep-dish pie, so I made a tart with a lattice crust. I supplemented the market cherries with some wild cherries that I foraged in Battery Kemble on Friday. It made a fine tart, and I got many kudos. My efforts at pie crust are usually not well received by my +1, who is a Pennsylvania Dutch boy who grew up eating pie. After more than 30 years, it looks like I am finally getting the hang of it.

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