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Wine Guy 23

Unsulfured and Desulfurized Wine

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Sulfur, sulfur, sulfur, I get headaches because of sulfur, does that wine have sulfur in it, red wine has too much sulfur... blah blah blah, i think we all have heard it over and over again. check this out, and have your say , NO MORE SULFUR?

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:blink:

Well, in young Mosel whites, you can often find some SO2, but it DOES blow off, given some air. I'm not certain what this invention is intended to accomplish. It will certainly add $$ to the cost of each bottle.

Perhaps Jake, our resident chemistry expert, can enlighten us?

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One of Randall Grahm's pet peeves is high SO2 in wine. And yet, he also criticizes a segment of the biodynamic movement for failing to tame their funk.

As with all technologies, SO2 is likely neither an unalloyed blessing nor an unmitigated curse.

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One of Randall Grahm's pet peeves is high SO2 in wine. And yet, he also criticizes a segment of the biodynamic movement for failing to tame their funk.

As with all technologies, SO2 is likely neither an unalloyed blessing nor an unmitigated curse.

I understand the "sulfur gives me a headache" argument... to a point. True, a small segment of the population is highly susceptible to the compound, but really, a good amount of the time it is just the booze. Is such superstition worth the risk of hooking up a device to a fresh bottle of wine which shoots hydrogen peroxide into the wine?! I understand the chemistry, but is that not kinda tantamount to further adultery?-- and with the risk of malfunction, I just don't see the point.

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I understand the "sulfur gives me a headache" argument... to a point. True, a small segment of the population is highly susceptible to the compound, but really, a good amount of the time it is just the booze. Is such superstition worth the risk of hooking up a device to a fresh bottle of wine which shoots hydrogen peroxide into the wine?! I understand the chemistry, but is that not kinda tantamount to further adultery?-- and with the risk of malfunction, I just don't see the point.

it goes hand in hand with a fluent hand in the beginning making the wine, the proper way, and with out flaw. one should not have to remove a flaw, that another placed i nthe wine. High alcohol=reverse osmosis, dealcoholization--TCA=unhigenic, dirty work areas, or poor harvested cork--High Sulfur= improper measures, or screw cap closures (which are good, but one must know how they are handled).. many facets come into account. with all the advances today, i do not think that wine should follow the role with technolgy, unless it is research for lost DNA of varietal study, soil composition, climate studies, etc.. to be continued

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One of Randall Grahm's pet peeves is high SO2 in wine. And yet, he also criticizes a segment of the biodynamic movement for failing to tame their funk.

As with all technologies, SO2 is likely neither an unalloyed blessing nor an unmitigated curse.

According to the article, after this invention is used the wine is "almost sulphur free". Sulphur occurs naturally during fermentation in small quantities of about 7-10 ppm. A winemaker I spoke with (whose wines are 100% biodynamic) told me that a level of 30-35 ppm was necessary to maintain for the stability of the wine. These are still very low levels. The maximum amount allowed by the EU is 400 ppm.

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I often think of times I have been in Europe where you drink the wine there, and the sulphur seems to be far lower than wines here in the states. I know you need stability in wines for shipping extended distances and temperature changes, but it sure would be noce to figure out a way to do t with less sulphur required. I am not affected by it as much as my wife is, but still.

 

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