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Amsterdam Falafelshop - Local Franchise for Late-Night Falafel and Fries in Several Area Locations


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'Pork Belly said:

Stopped in this Sunday for a felafel. Amazing. The pita was pillowy soft. The toppings were fresh and varied (ask for it spicy). And the felafel balls were spot-on. Plus, this is no teenager behind the counter. This is a guy who knows how to put a felafel sandwich together so you get just the right proportions in every bite. I haven't been to Amsterdam Felafel yet, and would be interested to hear from anyone who's been to both. Hard to believe it could be much better.

I will say that the falafel from Amsterdam simply does not compare to the one at Max's. I found it to be extremely dense and moist, rather than the amazingly light, crisp texture of the ones at Max's.

You can choose from white or wheat pita, and the guy filling the pitas that night was a little impatient and flustered despite the fact that it wasn't really that busy. It was a little weird. Chill out man!

I think that the selection of toppings at Amsterdam is a bit more varied and a little bit better. Every time I go to Max's they're out of one that I like (though I guess that shows its popularity).

The fries at Amsterdam are okay, nothing to write home about. They have "Dutch mayo" which is too sweet for my fries and is a bit closer to salad cream.

Nonetheless, today I find myself craving the delicious toppings from Amsterdam.

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Ate at Amsterdam Falafel this weekend. I am at a loss as to why this doesn't get as many mentions as a burger joint. This is amazing stuff. Falafel is made to order and there is an infinite variety of toping you can apply, limited only by the space on top of your falafel. Toppings including some very spicy garlic dip, to grilled eggplant, to roasted cauliflower. Fries were very good as well. This reminded me of Falafel I have had in Europe.

Note..This is messy and can be extremly spicy. No plate is provided and neither are utensils. But they are not necessary, just be careful to eat over the table.

If you have never been here, go at earliest oppurtunity. Yes, skip the burger or flatbread and live on the edge. :lol:

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Ate at Amsterdam Falafel this weekend. I am at a loss as to why this doesn't get as many mentions as a burger joint. This is amazing stuff. Falafel is made to order and there is an infinite variety of toping you can apply, limited only by the space on top of your falafel. Toppings including some very spicy garlic dip, to grilled eggplant, to roasted cauliflower. Fries were very good as well. This reminded me of Falafel I have had in Europe.

Note..This is messy and can be extremly spicy. No plate is provided and neither are utensils. But they are not necessary, just be careful to eat over the table.

If you have never been here, go at earliest oppurtunity. Yes, skip the burger or flatbread and live on the edge. :lol:

Agreed all around. I think the fries are among the best in the city. With so many dipping options to choose from, it's hard to go wrong here.

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I am at a loss as to why this doesn't get as many mentions as a burger joint.

Falafel is for distraught beatniks, hungry hippies and pipe smoking Proust scholars in tweed who only read books to spite television as if nary a shitty thing had ever been printed. Burgers are the lowest common denominator and therefore the great equalizer. The tapestried spread of weird pickles, variations of eggplant and some shit with parsley in it is the Bohemian counter-culture’s war chant propped by itinerant gustatory travels and desperate non-conformity. Westerners are not all entirely familiar or comfortable with Eastern vegetarian fare and esoteric toppings (even fried), like when that one guy called another guy wearing a Turkish flag T-shirt a Communist.

Consuming up to 200% of the RDA of ground meat conveniently packaged with cheese and bread in every bite is the American dream and dining trifecta. From humble to haughty, the burger is the universal Capitalist mascot while beef is a neccessary dinner commodity but primal cuts are costly. It was and will always be the gratefully recognized bounty of summer BBQs, college cafeterias and “Best Of...” food journalism exposés.

When there is nothing else left to try or talk about and no one can figure out why airline seats are narrower when gas is cheaper than milk, everyone can agree to cheer for burgers.

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On the universal scale of wonderfulness, how wonderful is Amsterdam Falafel? I know it's an inexpensive meal, that's not what is being asked.

Rather, is it Israeli style--i.e. all chick peas and lots of parsley? Or Egyptian style with fava beans?

Many thx from this intermittent visitor.

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I have to say, compared to many, if not all, of the falafel joints in NYC, this place does it better...excellent, fried to order falafel balls and I like the ability to put whatever I want to into my own sandwich. Toppings as fresh and varied as any I've seen.

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I have to say, compared to many, if not all, of the falafel joints in NYC, this place does it better...excellent, fried to order falafel balls and I like the ability to put whatever I want to into my own sandwich. Toppings as fresh and varied as any I've seen.

I haven't been to Amsterdam Falafelship in a couple of years now, but do they make (not just fry; I mean actually form with two spoons) their falafel balls to order? Both Max's Kosher Cafe (which is still the best falafel I've ever had, and I was just there about a month ago) and Cafe Nessma (where I got a very good one last week) do.

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the balls are formed to order...however I'm not sure that that is the dominant factor in the quality of the finished product--i think their balls are too small, giving the falafel a great crunch but not always much flavor...

I like that you can choose whether to have 3 or 5 falafel balls in the pita...that way, you can really cram a decent amount of other stuff in there, further obscuring their lack of flavor.

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Amsterdam falafel has been my go-to falafel place for years now.  Today's lunch was good with fresh, crispy but light balls and the usual large array of fresh toppings and good fries. However, why oh why did they start using shitty pita bread.  It was extra small and thin so it was hard to fill with toppings and lacked any flavor. They used to have pretty good more pillowy pita bread (factory-made I'm pretty sure, not homemade), but I guessed they changed.  This is a real shame because it would otherwise have been a pretty perfect meal.  What is up with the lack of decent pita bread at casual Mediterranean places (or Dutch here) in DC?  The two med places in Cleveland Park have awful, thin pitas that get soggy and fall apart.  I'd love fresh made, Israeli-style pita, but I'd settle for the decent King of Pita brand from VA that I can by in the grocery store.

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 I'd love fresh made, Israeli-style pita, but I'd settle for the decent King of Pita brand from VA that I can by in the grocery store.

Have you had the pita from Mediterranean Bakery in Alexandria? That's the best, I think.

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Amsterdam falafel has been my go-to falafel place for years now.  Today's lunch was good with fresh, crispy but light balls and the usual large array of fresh toppings and good fries. However, why oh why did they start using shitty pita bread.  It was extra small and thin so it was hard to fill with toppings and lacked any flavor. They used to have pretty good more pillowy pita bread (factory-made I'm pretty sure, not homemade), but I guessed they changed.  This is a real shame because it would otherwise have been a pretty perfect meal.  What is up with the lack of decent pita bread at casual Mediterranean places (or Dutch here) in DC?  The two med places in Cleveland Park have awful, thin pitas that get soggy and fall apart.  I'd love fresh made, Israeli-style pita, but I'd settle for the decent King of Pita brand from VA that I can by in the grocery store.

Glad to know I wasn't imagining the change. I recently had some falafel there after a multi-year hiatus. I thought maybe I was remembering wrong that their pitas were good. The rest of the meal was just as enjoyable put the pita was a dud. The contents were seeping out everywhere and it was impossible to do the old "smash the balls and slide the toppings in" maneuver because the pita started to tear.

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Glad to know I wasn't imagining the change. I recently had some falafel there after a multi-year hiatus. I thought maybe I was remembering wrong that their pitas were good. The rest of the meal was just as enjoyable put the pita was a dud. The contents were seeping out everywhere and it was impossible to do the old "smash the balls and slide the toppings in" maneuver because the pita started to tear.

This is a coincidence, I haven't been to this place in months and I just happened to go for lunch yesterday in Adams Morgan. Similar report to the Doctor - pita bread was crap - not stale, but lacks flavor and even worse it split all of the way open and all of the fillings fell into the bottom of the bag.  The fillings were still pretty good though. I also had a small fries which are still good and crispy. Recently, I ate another low country restaurant who had similar very good (even better) crisp tatters - St. Arnolds in Cleveland Park.

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I've gone a couple of times to their L'Enfant Plaza location and really enjoyed the falafel and the fixings bar.  I used to pile up on the fried eggplant which was as good as the falafel.  Ironically, yesterday I had a hankering so went to the Clarendon location for the first time.  Wouldn't you know it, the place looked emptied out and a guy told me they had just closed.  Figures...

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Amsterdam falafel virgin and I've never been to Max's.  but I had the best falafel sandwich tonight ever, after having dinner at tails up goat.  I smooshed the falafels and then opened up the pita pocket, dumped in tzatiki and cucumber salad.  The falafels were crispy and well seasoned.  The stoners serving were a bit of a clown show but I'd go back.

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7 minutes ago, Ericandblueboy said:

Amsterdam falafel virgin and I've never been to Max's.  but I had the best falafel sandwich tonight ever, after having dinner at tails up goat.

Go to Max's (in Wheaton, as you know), and see if you post this a second time - I don't think you will.

1) Order and pay
2) Give the ticket to the falafel-makers (ask for "Everything, Medium-Heat")
3) Sit at a random table
4) Tell us about your falafel - I suggest "Medium" heat - you're going to *love* it.

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IMHO, a large part of what makes a good falafel sandwich is the sum of the ingredients and how they are arranged in the pita.  At Amsterdam they give you a pita full of falafel, and you add the salads, they also (unless they have changed) don't give you a plate.  It is therefore very hard to get a good mix going on.

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I went back in broad daylight.  I ordered 1 regular sandwich with 5 balls.  I proceeded to smoosh my balls a bit, and then added some hummus, tzaziki, cucumber salad, cole slaw, and green spicy sauce.  As soon as I bit into a falafel, I felt the sandwich was a bust.  The falafels were over-fried - too damn crispy, dry and hard.  I managed to eat about half of it and disappointing threw away the other half.  On the other hand, I liked the reggae music mon even if the food is not irie.

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On 5/1/2017 at 7:43 AM, pras said:

IMHO, a large part of what makes a good falafel sandwich is the sum of the ingredients and how they are arranged in the pita.  At Amsterdam they give you a pita full of falafel, and you add the salads, they also (unless they have changed) don't give you a plate.  It is therefore very hard to get a good mix going on.

Entirely correct.

Humus should be spread first. Then a few falafel, then toppings and tahini, then a few more falafel, then more toppings and tahini.

The ideal, which is hard to find here but is prevalent in the middle east, includes french fries as one of the key ingredients that's layered in.

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1 hour ago, mtureck said:

Entirely correct.

Humus should be spread first. Then a few falafel, then toppings and tahini, then a few more falafel, then more toppings and tahini.

The ideal, which is hard to find here but is prevalent in the middle east, includes french fries as one of the key ingredients that's layered in.

Primanti Bros. Felafel? :lol:

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18 hours ago, mtureck said:

Entirely correct.

Humus should be spread first. Then a few falafel, then toppings and tahini, then a few more falafel, then more toppings and tahini.

The ideal, which is hard to find here but is prevalent in the middle east, includes french fries as one of the key ingredients that's layered in.

Only thing I disagree with is that they do not put "fries" inside, they put "chips" inside.

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Immediately after eating my proteins at Federalist Pig for lunch, I went to Amsterdam Falafel for some fiber (just a small sandwich).  They were playing some African pop music which I really digged. 

The balls were crispy on the outside, soft, salty and fluffy on the inside, and they even crush them for you.  I was handed a pita with the balls smooshed and ready to be topped.  I topped it with 2 kinds of cucumbers - sliced pickled and diced fresh, and then some tzatziki with even more cucumbers in it.  The contrasting textures of crunchy and soft was wonderful.

Next time I'll skip the BBQ and just get my falafel.  I wish there's one near me.  I've had Cava, Pita Pouch, the Halal Guys and they all suck compared to Amsterdam.

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