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21 hours ago, dracisk said:

Thank you for mentioning that about the bar at Husk. They don't say anything about food in the bar on their website, so I'll try for a table right when they open for dinner. Hopefully like you I'll get lucky! Presumably they save some spots for walk-ins.

I tried for a single walk-in at Husk a couple of years ago and they didn't have anything, so they directed me to the bar.  The menu is very limited, there was a burger and some small plates if I recall.  I ended up just getting a drink and a snack and walking elsewhere for dinner (I think I ended up at FIG that night, no issue sitting at the bar with a full menu)

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Last week was my first visit to Charleston. I hoped the city would live up to the hype, but damn, it exceeded it. We were there four days and nights, and tried to pack as many restaurants as our sched

We had the same appetizer at FIG a couple weeks ago....those were delicious indeed. I guess I owe a post....   Dinner at Edmund's Oast, a brewpub with good food. You won't find a beer list f

Great article from The Ringer about Rodney Scott and John Lewis, and what they're doing with their respective Charleston restaurants. https://www.theringer.com/2017/8/22/16180430/soul-of-barbecue

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Just now, TedE said:

(I think I ended up at FIG that night, no issue sitting at the bar with a full menu)

That's really good to know. Thanks. I still have  a reservation at The Grocery, which I'll cancel as needed. If I can't get into Husk maybe I'll wander over to FIG since it's a short walk as opposed to getting back in the car for The Grocery. Someone upthread said FIG was better than Husk anyway.

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In 2013, I went to Charleston, and had this to say about The Ordinary and the Grocery:

"The Ordinary was actually extraordinary. We started with two crudos/ceviches, octopus and lobster. The octopus is particularly amazing because it was very tender but not mushy. Those were followed by a dozen oysters. They had 5 varieties and we chose the plumpest for the "Moscow," which were topped with a little creme fraiche and caviar. Next were oysters bottarga and fried oysters with beef tartare. When I inquired where was the bottarga, I was told it was in the butter. Instead of oysters topped with bottarga, these had breadcrumbs on top. So we asked if they can give us half a dozen baked oysters with shaved bottarga on top, and they said ok. In the mean time we sucked down their oysters bottarga, and then the fried oysters which went really well with the beef tartare. The fried oysters were cornmeal dusted, which isn't my favorite but the tartare softened the texture for me. Next were clams meunière and bbq shrimps. I love clams and these were tasty if not plentiful. The shrimp was unexpected as they were served in a bowl with a sauce. I was expecting shrimp lathered with BBQ sauce. The shrimp also came in different sizes, from small to jumbo. The smaller ones actually had a bit more flavor. The only dish I wouldn't order again would be the shrimp. Finally we got our oysters bottarga, which was very salty because the oysters were briny and the bottarga added more salt. So it made sense that their concept had breadcrumbs, radish strips and bottarga melted in butter.

For dessert we went to The Grocery which was across the street. The bone marrow brûlée wasn't on the menu as a standalone dish, but they made it for us anyway. It was a pile of toasted bread, a pile of parsley and celery leaves, a small pile of salt, a small pile of black pepper, and a jar of bone marrow brûlée. I'm not sure what was in the brûlée but I would've preferred just straight up bone marrow"

I never actually hit a Brock restaurant, but I also ate at FIG (also excellent).

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To report back, I ended up at Husk and Hominy Grill. I realize that neither of these are off the beaten path or exciting newcomers, but, given that it was my first trip to Charleston, I got kind of fixated on getting into Husk, which I could only do for my one dinner, and I had limited options for my second and final meal, which had to happen in mid- to late afternoon because of my work schedule.

Anyway, at Husk I had Wood Fired Virginia Salts Oysters, Chili Miso Butter, Pepper Mash, Lemon. Delicious, especially the broth in which the smoky oysters rested. I also had Carolina Heritage Pork, Field Peas and Butterbeans, Embered Brassicas, Jowl Bacon, Smoked Tomato, Boiled Peanut. Also delicious. I can't say I usually get excited about peas, butterbeans, and boiled peanuts, but the medley beside the crispy pork was as delicious as the pork itself. I didn't know what brassicas were until after the meal, but I definitely tasted their mustardy flavor, which was also nice. I couldn't resist also ordering the Skillet of Real Cornbread, Benton’s Bacon Crumble. I could only eat a little (I finished it for breakfast the next morning) and really enjoyed it. Despite only detecting one actual bacon crumble, the smoky bacon flavor came through. As far as logistics, I got there about 5:45pm (they open at 5:30pm) on a Wednesday, put my name on the walk-in list, and they texted me exactly an hour later (what they estimated) to let me know my table was ready, which worked out perfectly since I was able to eat at a normal time and wander around the beautiful historic district while I waited. I really liked my friendly and down to earth server as well.

At Hominy Grill I had the She-Crab Soup (full of crab and not too thick) and the Shrimp and Grits (as tasty as reported). I was happy with my service there, too. The server was friendly and kept the sweet tea coming. Also, they have their own small parking lot.

I definitely want to go back to Charleston again, if not for work then definitely for pleasure some day. So much more to see and eat!

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We had two enjoyable dining experiences over Thanksgiving weekend. One was at The Ordinary, where we sat at the bar and ordered six different types of raw oysters at the happy hour special price.  The main menu offers several great options too, the highlight of which for me was the fried oysters on steak tartare -- not a combination that would seem to make sense but somehow it worked both in taste and especially texture. The oyster sliders are a bit pricey for what's in them but also well-conceived with balanced flavors.  Also, the brisket at Swig & Swine -- two locations, we went to the one in Summerville -- was quite possibly the best I've ever had not from Aaron Franklin.  So tender, with the right amount of fatty, smoky goodness mixed in.

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Thanks for all the great recommendations! You sure steered us right!

Our favorites were FIG and The Ordinary, and we also liked The Drawing Room in our hotel, The Vendue. The single best dish on our visit was at FIG, an appetizer of ricotta gnochi and lamb bolognese. I wish I had ordered two servings of this as my entree! I think my next favorite was steak tartare with fried oysters at The Ordinary. Perfectly fried. Oysters Rockefeller and asparagus soup with lump crab meat at The Drawing Room. Tuesday was half price wine night. Our bartender told us Bill Murray sat there Easter Sunday. He's often seen around town.

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We had the same appetizer at FIG a couple weeks ago....those were delicious indeed. I guess I owe a post....

 

Dinner at Edmund's Oast, a brewpub with good food. You won't find a beer list full of IPAs or anything, but you'll be able to get weird with sours or other strange flavor combos - they seem to get a little weird with their beer selection and brewing options. The Peanut Butter & Jelly is a favorite, but I did not have it - a few others looked pretty interesting too. I had Szech n Brett from Logsdon in Oregon and a weird doppleback from Kout na Sumave in the Czech Republic that's apparently really hard to find in the states. I had a roasted chicken dish with Carolina Gold rice and vegetables that was absolutely delicious, the skin was salty and crispy and the meat moist.

Lunch at Lewis Barbecue, from John Lewis - former pitmaster at La Barbecue in Austin and also helped open Franklin's I believe. I grade barbecue on a very steep curve, but I will say that I doubt there is a better barbecue restaurant south of DC. The hot sausage links were the star in my opinion, the pork was delicious and the brisket might have needed more seasoning in my opinion but I still ate it fast and wanted more. We absolutely housed the sides, didn't seem to be a bad option there either.

I had the fish stew at FIG and oh my was it good. The broth had a ton of flavor, I almost thought of the seafood as an afterthought. Recommended by our waiter, I loved it, and the gnocchi was already touched on above.

We made it to Husk for lunch, which I was skeptical about because a weekday lunch could certainly be hit or miss. Luckily, we got a hit - started carb heavy with the cornbread served with a pork butter and hush puppies made with their pork and a ranch sauce - they were unbeatable. I had the classic shrimp & grits meal that couldn't be topped, and I also tried the burger - I know, why would you get a burger at Husk? Actually, it was recommended by the waiter and we tried it, two patties smashed and it was on par with the best burgers I've had.

Thanks to this thread, we tried The Grocery and snacked around on small plates and salads. For us, this was the right choice - some of the meals for the table looked delicious, but we wanted to hop around a bit. Started safe with the Italian Chopped Salad - by this point, I needed some nutrients - and lamb meatballs that tasted Mediterranean-inspired. Added a pasta with ramps dish and classic fried oysters.

All in all, a fantastic trip with five delicious meals. It took me about four days to adjust back to normal, so next time I might have to be less fun and take it a little lighter....

Almost forgot...we also snuck away to the beach and had lunch at Rita's Seaside Grille in Folly Beach. Part of the High Cotton/Slightly North of Broad group, we had different seafood dishes that were both fresh and full of flavor. With not a ton of dining options on the island, I'd recommend this one.

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I recently took my annual trip to Charleston, and had meals at three good restaurants.

The Drawing Room:  The Drawing Room is a fairly new restaurant in the Vendue Hotel.  For an appetizer I had “Harder’s Asparagus Bisque, 1885” which according to their menu is a combination of “lump crab, cured yolk, sc buttermilk, grilled rice bread and Lemon.”  There was a bit too much lemon for my taste, but all in all not too bad.  For the main course I had the Pan Seared Scallops, which were very good.  It is a very nice restaurant.

The Fig:  The Fig is in my opinion one of the best, if not the best, restaurant in Charleston.  If you want to eat at the Fig it is almost a requirement that you call for a reservation four weeks in advance.    For my entre I had “Suckling Pig & Carolina Gold Rice.”  It was absolutely delicious.  The pork was the tenderest, most flavorful I have ever had.   I highly recommend The Fig if you are going to be in Charleston.

Rodney Scott’s BBQ:  For years the Scotts have had a well known BBQ restaurant in Hemingway, SC.  A few years ago Rodney Scott left the business in Hemingway and opened Rodney Scott’s Whole Hog BBQ in Charleston.   If you like pork BBQ, this is the place to go. In addition to various kinds of pork, they serve BBQ chicken and fried catfish fillets.  As a side dish to the BBQ, they have first rate hush puppies, something you can only dream about if you live in the DC area.

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10 hours ago, Gadarene said:

Bar Normandy in Charleston may be my favorite place anywhere.

You know this, but others may not, so permit me to clarify: Normandy Farm Artisan Bakery is a mini-chain in Charleston, with locations on both Windermere Blvd. and Broad St. 

Last Summer, the Broad St. location added a happy hour menu with Chef Alex Lira, and a drinks program run by Philip Michael Cohen - this "officially" begins at 3 PM, but you can purchase beers earlier than that.

Feb 8, 2017 - "Bar Normandy on Broad Street Is Unconventionally Delicious" by Hanna Raskin on postandcourier.com

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We had a really nice lunch at Leon's Oyster with friends previously from Alexandria.  We had some hushpuppies and raw oysters to start, which were both fine.  We got some really good cocktails and frozen rose, the bar program here has some really good things.  For mains I had the fried chicken, which had an amazing thin but flavorful and crispy crust to it.  I loved the spices used, it was a bit addictive.  Hubby had the catfish sandwich.  We also got the brussels sprouts which were really crispy and had good spices, as well. I got a side of the black eyed pea salad, I was trying to figure out the dressing, but I am not sure what it was, I thought it was very tasty though.  Apparently this place gets really crowded, we had a fluke moment of being able to walk in and get a table.  Definitely a great spot, a little out of the tourist area.  Not a huge menu, but the things on it were well done.

We then went to Lewis Barbecue to day drink, if I wasn't terribly full from lunch the Texas BBQ spot had amazing smelling meats, apparently the brisket nachos are amazing, this was very hard to pass up, as stellar nachos are one of my life passions.  It was a nice place to drink, they have a big outside area that we were at for the five minutes before it started pouring down the rain, we then retreated to their inside bar area.  I just drank beer, but they had all sorts of fruit infused liquors and other things going on behind the counter to try out next time.

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Last week was my first visit to Charleston. I hoped the city would live up to the hype, but damn, it exceeded it. We were there four days and nights, and tried to pack as many restaurants as our schedule and stomachs would allow. This was about trying a lot of renowned favorites rather than necessarily trying something new, but I can't wait to go back. 

McCrady's This is the 18-seat tasting menu bar that Sean Brock opened last year. I've read that Brock said he wanted to strike a balanced approach here, ensuring that meals don't go past two hours and that diners don't leave hungry or overly stuffed. I'd say he nailed it. It was 14 courses, with each course between 2-4 bites. Highlights were: the carrot tart with baby carrot slices arranged like a rose, and then revealing a sweet carrot gelee upon first bite; an aged beef strip steak accompanied by sour cabbage and farro (I normally don't care for farro, but here it was smoky, toasty and excellent. Chef Brock said that's because they burn the farro and then thresh it in a barrel); the Charleston ice cream of Carolina Gold Rice accompanied by fresh herbs and thinly sliced raw okra; and the "foiechamacallit", their take on a whatchamacallit candy bar but filled with foie gras. Brock was in-house, supervising the staff throughout dinner and serving many plates himself.

Without exaggeration, this was the best meal I've ever had. I don't say that lightly but after putting a lot of thought into it, I can't think of a better menu from beginning to end than what I ate here. This is an opportunity to catch a great chef at his peak and I'm grateful we did. And lest you think it is difficult to get reservations, we managed to get a 6:30pm seating just three days earlier - and they now accept bookings via OpenTable.

Husk  We went here for lunch, and I think it suffered a little from our McCrady's experience. The shrimp and grits was excellent. We also ordered the fried chicken which I thought was good but the crust was a little thin and I didn't get a lot of flavor from it. I think I just prefer my chicken to be a little spicier.

Edmund's Oast  This is a fun place with a giant open seating area, lots of communal tables, a long bar, and a large assortment of beer and charcuterie that's made in-house. The vibe reminds me a lot of The Publican in Chicago. I wish they had a larger selection of malty beers, but that's a complaint I could register just about anywhere these days. I went with the Andechser Doppelbock Dunkel for a couple of rounds, and before leaving tried their Peanut Butter & Jelly beer. It tasted just like peanut butter and jelly, but was drinkable. I finished it all, but wouldn't order it again. It's a nice novelty.

Leon's Oyster House  We fortunately found a couple of seats at the bar here, which was still packed an hour before closing. I've heard such great things about the fried chicken but had no room. We did however try a platter of the fried oysters and this place knows its way around a fryer. The breading covered every centimeter of the oysters, without being clumpy in any spots and none of the oysters stuck together. 

Rodney's Scott BBQ  I've always wanted to try whole hog bbq so I'm glad Rodney Scott opened this place in Charleston. I snuck a peak at the smokehouse in the back and the dozen or more giant smokers left little doubt they are doing it the authentic way. The pork was moist and the combination of flavors from different parts of the hog really made it unique -- like enjoying the light and dark meat from a turkey.

Lewis' Barbecue  John Lewis helped open Franklin's Barbecue and LA Barbecue in Austin, so his credentials can't be questioned. His brisket is as tender as butter with a blackened crisp crust that tastes of pepper and hints of sugar. I could have used a little more smoke flavor, but that's a personal taste that I know isn't shared by many. Their hot gut sausage was dense but moist, almost like a polish sausage. It might have been my favorite bite. I'd also strongly recommend the green chile corn pudding. One nice quirk is their green barbecue sauce, made with peppers and meant as an accompaniment for his smoked turkey. Once I tasted the two together, I couldn't eat the turkey without it. It may be something I have to try at home.

The Ordinary  The Ordinary has probably ruined most raw bars for me moving forward. We ate the tuna tartare, the red snapper ceviche and an avocado and red porgy ceviche. These were complex ceviches with a great mix of sweetness, salt and spice. The bartender recommended the chili garlic snow crab too, which were two crab claws served with a swipe of chili sauce. The chili sauce was legitimately spicy, but I could have licked the bowl. I'd strongly recommend just sitting at the bar here and ordering small plates until you're full.

Xiao Bao Biscuit  We went here for lunch. Had the Bo Bo Ji, which is sichuan style chicken, cilantro, scallion and peanut salad; and the Mapo Dou Fu, which is spicy pork with chili oil, rice and greens. Enjoyed both dishes.

FIG  Our final meal was an early dinner at FIG. We had the tomato tarte tatin and ricotta gnocchi for appetizers and the suckling pig with Carolina Gold Rice. It was all as good as advertised. The only complaint was that dinner felt a little rushed. They clearly need to move tables especially that early in the evening, but the dishes came very quickly. Still, the food is fantastic. I just wouldn't go there for a leisurely meal.  

 

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Stayed at the King Charles - because they have free parking.  It's a nice 3 star joint - with lots of families; however, I was not disturbed.  

I went to Middleton Place to see the camellias bloom, but it was so cold that they didn't look very impressive.  I did have a nice lunch there.  I wanted try a recipe by Edna Lewis and the grilled quail was delicious.  In the afternoon, I also visited the Magnolia Plantation.  This place definitely should be visited while warm.

In the city, I visited the Russell House, Calhoun Mansion, and the Aiken-Rhett House.  The audio tour at the Aiken-Rhett House is pretty awesome.  The Russell House is interesting and the Calhoun Mansion is too full of its current owner's art collection - although the building itself is beautifully restored.

I had dinner at the Peninsula Grill.  The service and execution of the food were both excellent.  It just doesn't have a celebrity chef.  I also had dinner at the Ordinary, which remains a top seafood joint.  I had lunch at Hyman's.  Whatever you do, do not get the red crab claws - they're overcooked and not seasoned.  I see nothing special about their fried seafood either.  

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My mom and her sister, both 70+ years old, are heading to Charleston next month for a sisters trip. I credit my mom for my appreciation of good food of all varieties. That said, they'd probably enjoy a couple of quieter spots, and my aunt is not adventurous as my mom. 

They are staying in the French Quarter, so recommendations in that area would be best. Has anyone been to Fulton Five? That place is steps away from their hotel.

Thanks!

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On 8/23/2017 at 11:04 AM, JimCo said:

Great article from The Ringer about Rodney Scott and John Lewis, and what they're doing with their respective Charleston restaurants.

https://www.theringer.com/2017/8/22/16180430/soul-of-barbecue-charleston-south-carolina

On 11/18/2017 at 1:04 AM, JeffC said:

Thanks for the link, JimCo!  I haven't had Rodney Scott's barbecue in over a year, so a trip to Charleston is definitely in order.  And Lewis Barbecue sounds wonderful.  

On 5/9/2018 at 1:17 AM, JeffC said:

"How a Small-Town Pitmaster Turned a Dying Cuisine into the Stuff of Celebrity" by Tim Carman on washpost.com

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I'm going to be back in Charleston at the end of September for a weekend. I was there 2 years ago for less than 24 hours (quick work trip) and ate at Husk and Hominy Grill. I enjoyed both but don't necessarily feel the need to return to either with so many other places to try. This time I'll have Friday evening, all day Saturday, and most of the day Sunday (but probably not dinner). Does anyone have any thoughts on a good eating itinerary? I don't really feel constrained with spending, but the friend I'll be with is a bit more frugal. The only place I have in mind to try at this point is FIG, but I haven't refreshed my memory on the best places (which also may have changed in the last 2 years).

Also, last time I rented a car and stayed by the airport (and my worksite), but this time I'm considering staying in the historic district and not renting a car. I figure we should be able to walk or take short Ubers/Lyfts to most places we want to go. Does that make sense?

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14 hours ago, dracisk said:

I'm going to be back in Charleston at the end of September for a weekend. I was there 2 years ago for less than 24 hours (quick work trip) and ate at Husk and Hominy Grill. I enjoyed both but don't necessarily feel the need to return to either with so many other places to try. This time I'll have Friday evening, all day Saturday, and most of the day Sunday (but probably not dinner). Does anyone have any thoughts on a good eating itinerary? I don't really feel constrained with spending, but the friend I'll be with is a bit more frugal. The only place I have in mind to try at this point is FIG, but I haven't refreshed my memory on the best places (which also may have changed in the last 2 years).

Also, last time I rented a car and stayed by the airport (and my worksite), but this time I'm considering staying in the historic district and not renting a car. I figure we should be able to walk or take short Ubers/Lyfts to most places we want to go. Does that make sense?

25 minutes ago, JDawgBBall9 said:

100% on FIG. I'd also suggest Rodney Scott BBQ (or Lewis depending on your tastes)

Unless you're going across the bridge to the beach or something, you'll have no problem taking ride sharing apps a few miles

I would do FIG and The Ordinary.  You definitely can walk to the restaurants but the best sights are the plantations which would require a car to get to.  Barksdale House Inn and the King  Charles offer free parking if you decide to get a car.

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We had dinner twice at Edmund's Oast, with two different groups. We've been at Edmund's Oast almost annually since they've opened, and it remains worth the visit. The draft menu is very large--lots of taps--but also some nice bottles. The cocktail menu is small, but the spirit list is large.

Food is still very solid--the menu has a slightly Asian bent to it, such as the salt chicken served on rice surrounded by green curry, or the pork belly with chilies. There is some lowcountry influence as well, such as the benne seed beignets. I don't think that one could compare this restaurant to the best, most exciting of what the Charleston food scene has to offer. But it's a fun evening, with plenty of interesting things on the menu and a kick-butt cheeseburger that would almost certainly please any eater, including those that are less adventurous.

Edmund's Oast now also has a brewery, and we saw some of their beers at others stops in the Charleston/Kiawah Island corridor.

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15 minutes ago, ICD said:

For those needing a biscuit fix, Viscious Biscuit just opened in Mt. Pleasant.  I really enjoyed the chicken biscuit with pimento cheese.  Fun place.

That biscuit is pictured on their home page - for some reason (as in, "I imbibed too much last night"), that doesn't appeal to me, and I'm not sure why. I love biscuits, and I love fried-chicken biscuits. I also like good Pimento cheese (Husk (Nashville) had some of the best I've ever eaten), but for some reason the combination of all three things (plus ham, plus honey, according to the picture below) repulses me right now. In general, I find the biscuits in this video to be gunky - tell me I'm wrong?

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7 hours ago, DonRocks said:

That biscuit is pictured on their home page - for some reason (as in, "I imbibed too much last night"), that doesn't appeal to me, and I'm not sure why. I love biscuits, and I love fried-chicken biscuits. I also like good Pimento cheese (Husk (Nashville) had some of the best I've ever eaten), but for some reason the combination of all three things (plus ham, plus honey, according to the picture below) repulses me right now. In general, I find the biscuits in this video to be gunky - tell me I'm wrong?

Don, the biscuit I ate didn’t have ham and the sweet element was very restrained.  The pimento cheese was a little odd, but didn’t overwhelm the chicken like I thought it would.  It was very mild.  Plus, I’m on vacation and the weather’s been gorgeous, which makes everything taste better.  

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1 hour ago, ICD said:

Don, the biscuit I ate didn’t have ham and the sweet element was very restrained.  The pimento cheese was a little odd, but didn’t overwhelm the chicken like I thought it would.  It was very mild.  Plus, I’m on vacation and the weather’s been gorgeous, which makes everything taste better.  

Upon closer scrutiny, they're pimentos; not ham - duh - and that lone patch of moisture seems too isolated to be honey. The breading on the chicken looks really good!

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On ‎12‎/‎25‎/‎2018 at 10:36 AM, ICD said:

For those needing a biscuit fix, Viscious Biscuit just opened in Mt. Pleasant.  I really enjoyed the chicken biscuit with pimento cheese.  Fun place.

I ate at the Viscious Biscuit on my recent trip to Charleston and thought it very nice.  A nice variety of biscuits, plus sides like sausages, and eggs, and so on.  Warning:  when we left after our meal there was a crowd of about 20 people waiting to get in. I suggest you go early, like right as it opens.

Edited by John William G
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On a recent trip to Charleston, in addition to breakfast at the Vicious Biscuit, I had a wonderful meal at a restaurant I had never heard of, the Coda del Pesce.  The restaurant in not actually in Charleston, but on the Isle of Palms, about a half hour drive from the city.  It was well worth the drive.  There is a nice view of the ocean from most of the tables in the restaurant.

They began by serving us some Italian bread with an olive oil and basil dip.  For the first course we shared  the “Local Flounder ‘Braciole.’”  It was delicious.  For my second course I had “Heritage Bone In Pork Chop.”  (In spite of this description in the menu there was no bone in the serving I received.)  It was excellent.  They have a good selection of wines to go with the meals—mostly Italian, as one would expect.  We had a bottle of J. Hofstätter 2016 Gewürztraminer which was very nice.

I was with a group of three and all of us were extremely happy with our meal.  If you are in the Charleston area, and have time to drive to the Isle of Palms, you should not miss having a meal at the Coda del Pesce.

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For anyone vacationing in or near Charleston, I would strongly recommend the Undiscovered Charleston culinary tour: https://undiscoveredcharleston.com/

The tour is led by Chef Forrest Parker, an area native who is passionate about history as he is about food. He leads a small group (in our case it was just my wife and I) on a walking tour of downtown Charleston giving you insights into military sieges, architecture and the history of the region's cuisine and restaurants. He is a Palmetto-certified tour guide, and really knows his stuff. 

After touring for a couple of hours, you then enjoy a four-course meal and wine pairings at an area wine bar. Chef Forrest cooks the meal in front of you and walks you through some of the historic grains such as Carolina Gold Rice and Jimmy Red Corn, and the efforts being made to preserve them. The meal itself was worth the price of the tour, as you enjoy fresh gazpacho, Carolina shrimp and grits (which were the best version I've ever tasted), Chicken Perlau, and then a refreshing peach dessert. This was one of the best meals I had in Charleston, and I enjoyed several great meals.

The overall experience and value was just fantastic. 

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Thanks for that.  Sounds like something we might do when we next go to Charleston.

While I'm at it, I might as well close the loop on my above post.  As stated, we were in Charleston for several nights on our way home to NYC from Florida in late March and loved Fig. We were also pleasantly surprised at Purlieu & would definitely go back. A nice Southern influenced French meal was had at 39 Rue de Jean and I believe they have a Savannah location as well. Chez Nous was also very good but its a very limited menu of 2 choices, changing daily, so I’m not sure if its always as it was when we dined there. All but 39 Rue de Jean took reservations thru Resy. 

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With only a couple of hours to wander around Charleston on a Friday afternoon, and having never been to Charleston before, and with many of the nationally recognized restaurants only offering dinner service, I walked into Husk for a late lunch.

The place was hoping, I put my name on the list around 1:30, and was called around 2pm.  Lunch service technically ends at 2:30 and by 2pm they had stopped taking walk ins.  So if you want to walk in at Husk for lunch, I would suggest getting there no later than 1:30 or 1:45.  I left around 3:30 and never felt rushed, although I was definitely one of the last tables being served. 

I was given a two top on the second floor balcony.  Which was nice, although not totally shaded from the sun on a warm September afternoon.  Appetizer offerings ran $9-$12 and the entrees ran $14-$18.

I started with the Pimento cheese, grilled crostini, pickle relish, crispy country ham ($11).  The order had 5 pieces and pretty much kicked ass.  A nice interplay between the pimento cheese and strongly flavored Benton's ham (which was crumbled) and the acid of the pickle relish. 

For an entree I went with the Shrimp and grits (because when in Charleston, obviously) with sweet peppers and onions and a fennel tomato broth.  The sweet peppers and onions didn't add a lot to the dish, but otherwise the dish pretty much kicked ass.  The grits were excellent, no doubt made with a lot of butter, and the fennel tomato broth was refreshing.  

To drink I had the Windy Hill Orchard Ginger Gold cider which is infused with ginger.  A tad sweet but otherwise very nice.

With the shrimp and grits I had a glass of the Failla 2017 pinot from Oregon, which was fine but nothing special.

It was my first time at Husk, so obviously I had not dined when Sean Brock was running things, and Husk now has 4 locations in the Southeast, but overall I was impressed with the cooking, at least at the Mothership location.  I'd recommend, especially for a nice late lunch.  

  

Husk Pimento.jpg

Husk Shrimp grits.jpg

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13 hours ago, Tweaked said:

I started with the Pimento cheese, grilled crostini, pickle relish, crispy country ham ($11).  The order had 5 pieces and pretty much kicked ass.  A nice interplay between the pimento cheese and strongly flavored Benton's ham (which was crumbled) and the acid of the pickle relish.

Great review, Chris. DIShGo and I had a variation of this at Husk Nashville a few years ago, and both thought it was the pimento cheese we'd ever had.

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