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The Lemon Tree, Rockville - Closed.


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The Lemon Tree is a really nice little Mediterranean market and cafe in Rockville. It's become a frequent lunch spot for me and Mr P. Check their website for the menu.

I'm not sure I'd know a good felafel from a bad one, but Lemon Tree's have a nice flavor and are served with warm pita and sauce. The kabobs are not usually overcooked (a pet peeve; I hate a dry kabob) and dishes like imam bayildi (eggplant and onion) are really satisfying if you like that kind of thing. Today I had a panini with Turkish sausage, kaseri cheese, and tomato. Nothing special, just good, solid, tasty food.

Mostly I like Lemon Tree for the good Turkish coffee (served with a little rosewater gelee-type sweet on the side) and the baklava, which is light and flaky on top, honey soaked but not sticky or gooey or mushy on the bottom, and filled with pistachio. As someone who loves baklava but is allergic to walnuts, this makes me very, very happy.

On the other hand, the so-called "gourmet desserts" (which would appear to be European-style pastries) are not particularly good. A strawberry and whipped cream layer cake had the odd texture and off-flavor I (perhaps wrongly) associate with mass-produced goods stored in the fridge.

The space is warm, clean, and bright. Order and pay at the counter and they'll bring your food to your table when it's ready.

This particular bit of writing sucks for specifics, and I'm sorry for that, as I'm one of those people who wants to know why something is good, not just that it is, in someone's opinion. The muse isn't with me today, but Lemon Tree deserves attention nonetheless. Hopefully one of you can add to my vague praise.

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The Lemon Tree is a really nice little Mediterranean market and cafe in Rockville. It's become a frequent lunch spot for me and Mr P. Check their website for the menu.

I'm not sure I'd know a good felafel from a bad one, but Lemon Tree's have a nice flavor and are served with warm pita and sauce. The kabobs are not usually overcooked (a pet peeve; I hate a dry kabob) and dishes like imam bayildi (eggplant and onion) are really satisfying if you like that kind of thing. Today I had a panini with Turkish sausage, kaseri cheese, and tomato. Nothing special, just good, solid, tasty food.

Mostly I like Lemon Tree for the good Turkish coffee (served with a little rosewater gelee-type sweet on the side) and the baklava, which is light and flaky on top, honey soaked but not sticky or gooey or mushy on the bottom, and filled with pistachio. As someone who loves baklava but is allergic to walnuts, this makes me very, very happy.

On the other hand, the so-called "gourmet desserts" (which would appear to be European-style pastries) are not particularly good. A strawberry and whipped cream layer cake had the odd texture and off-flavor I (perhaps wrongly) associate with mass-produced goods stored in the fridge.

The space is warm, clean, and bright. Order and pay at the counter and they'll bring your food to your table when it's ready.

This particular bit of writing sucks for specifics, and I'm sorry for that, as I'm one of those people who wants to know why something is good, not just that it is, in someone's opinion. The muse isn't with me today, but Lemon Tree deserves attention nonetheless. Hopefully one of you can add to my vague praise.

My wife and I occasionally stop in for lunch when shopping in that area. I agree with all your comments, and would add that the eggplant is excellent.

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Despite the overtly Turkish menu and selection of Turkish groceries for sale, I found The Lemon Tree's food disappointing for some common Turkish items. Su böreği were very chewy, and the cheese filling was decidedly on the dry side and very mildly herbed. Ignoring for a moment the use of soy protein instead of meat, their riff on lahmacun was a rolled up wrap sandwich, and didn't much resemble the usual hot folded-and-grilled item. The accompanying salad was more-or-less American - lettuce, tomato and onion - undressed and completely devoid of dill, that cornerstone of Turkish salads.

Nice space, some useful supplies. Good selection of çay glassware.

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We wanted to stop in at the Lemon Tree last week, but there was paper up over the windows and no lights on. The website still works, but the phone number has been disconnected. It appears to have closed...
From an inside source: apparently the owner was subletting the space and suddenly had his rent jacked up and couldn't make the numbers work.
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From an inside source: apparently the owner was subletting the space and suddenly had his rent jacked up and couldn't make the numbers work.

Thanks for the update; please keep us posted if your inside source has any more interesting news, like "they'll be reopening [date] at [location]". Especially if it involves coffee and baklava.

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