Jump to content

Castries


Recommended Posts

Has anyone else tried this stuff?

I saw it at the VA ABC in Rosslyn yesterday and figured "what the heck". The men in my family are huge peanut fans.

I tried a bit of it last night and thought it was rather good - not overwhelmingly peanut, and I didn't notice any artificial taste to it, just a pleasant mild peanut taste to it.

I might try some cocktails with it, but has anyone else done anything with it?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There's one with vanilla vodka, Godiva, and Castries on their site (if I remember correctly) that I'm already plotting to turn into a drink for my brother's fiancee...

Is that the one with chocolate syrup in the bottom? I thought of making that one for my wife if I ever picked up some Castries.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So, two drinks made this weekend with it:

A sort of Jamaican coffee - sort of. We didn't have Bailey's, so our Irish coffee was Jameson's and Castries rather than Jameson's and Bailey's. Next time, though, I'll use rum instead of Irish whisky.

For the future sister-in-law: 3/4 oz Castries, 3/4 oz Godiva chocolate liqueur, two drops of Penzey's double strength vanilla extract, shaken and strained. She's not a huge "strong drink" fan, and I would've considered filling it out with some milk had I any in the fridge; she didn't seem interested in adding heavy cream to it. :lol: I can't take full credit for it as there's a similar drink on the Castries website (if I remember correctly, it's 2 parts Castries, 1 part Godiva, 1 part vanilla vodka).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can't take full credit for it as there's a similar drink on the Castries website (if I remember correctly, it's 2 parts Castries, 1 part Godiva, 1 part vanilla vodka).

That is the one that is finished with a drizzle of chocolate syrup. What is your overall impression of Castries, novelty or something that would be a good addition to a well stocked bar?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm going to have to say: it depends. Personally, I don't typically keep any creme liqueurs around, mostly thanks to the need of refrigeration coupled with their high fat content.

At least, not in bottles - I do usually have a mini or two of Bailey's for Irish coffee mornings.

With this, I'd be MUCH more likely to keep some around because I like it a lot. The men in my family all tend to be rather big peanut fans in general, however, so keep that in mind. I also like to try to keep things that the future sister-in-law would like.

Overall, I would say it's more of a "fun novelty" like flavored Bailey's or that chai creme liqueur. It's good, but unless you're craving it for whatever reason, I wouldn't necessarily recommend running out and buying it right away.

On a side note, the bottle for it is rather cool, and if you know anyone who likes to collect just "cool bottles" (like said future sister-in-law), they might like it a lot. :lol:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On a side note, the bottle for it is rather cool, and if you know anyone who likes to collect just "cool bottles" (like said future sister-in-law), they might like it a lot. :lol:

Having a cool bottles that needs to be kept in a refrigerator seems like a waste to me and since my bar fridge is already packed with too many cream based potables I will have to pass for now.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Having a cool bottles that needs to be kept in a refrigerator seems like a waste to me and since my bar fridge is already packed with too many cream based potables I will have to pass for now.

It often is a waste - but that's part of the reason why I have a second fridge in my room! :lol:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It often is a waste - but that's part of the reason why I have a second fridge in my room! :lol:

Yeah, had to give the up my second fridge to make room for the new HDTV in the "Man Cave". It was either that or my bar, so I will have to make due with just one.

How assertive is the peanut flavor? I was thinking that a weird twist on Senegalese peanut soup might be a fun drink, using a simple syrup that was steeped with various kinds of curry related spices. But if the peanut flavor is a bit weak this might now work so well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The peanut flavor is muted. You know it is peanut, but it isn't like having a spoonful of peanut butter. If the spiced syrup you made isn't too overpowering, it could work. But getting that balance would be tough. Sounds like an interesting experiment though!

Cheers,

Marshall

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Now *THAT* sounds like a vodka drink I would actually drink!!!

Great, now I'm thristy . . . ;-)

Cheers,

Marshall

Well vodka is a good base for infusing, and I have infused my own raspberry vodka (actually three different types) so maybe I need actually pick-up some Castries after all.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm sure that your homemade raspberry infused vodka tastes 100% better than any of the commerical brands out there. Other than preserving, infusing is about the only other thing I think vodka is good for . . .

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh my god I'm drooling. The alcoholic version of my fourth grade dream.

Yeah I am really thinking of picking up of some Castries just to try my idea. I also thought that a splash of Australian Syrah into the mix might give that jammy flavor.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah I am really thinking of picking up of some Castries just to try my idea. I also thought that a splash of Australian Syrah into the mix might give that jammy flavor.

Not sure how you guys feel about me joining this thread. I am one of the creators of the Castries and can probably give you some insight on it, its origins and uses, as well as dispel some misconceptions (like needing to refrigerate the product after opening. Not true. Suggested, but to be honest the product has 24 month shelf life stability, refrigerated or not).

I'd love to jump in, but I'll wait until someone in the thread gives me the ok (don't want anyone to feel like they are being sold or marketed to. just want to chime in).

BTW, my name is David.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not sure how you guys feel about me joining this thread. I am one of the creators of the Castries and can probably give you some insight on it, its origins and uses, as well as dispel some misconceptions...

Heck, there isn't anything we love here more than talking about drinks. Fire away, David, and welcome to the group.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

David,

Welcome and please tell us more about your product, from what I have read it is rather unique. Anyway, it is not like you are trying to market some upscale fancy bottled flavorless vodka, so please sell away. I do have a couple of questions about the product.

1) Being that the peanut is so versatile and there are so many different flavor profiles to it (i.e. roasted, boiled, peanut butter...) what peanut flavor were you trying to achieve with the product?

2) Where are the peanuts from that are included in the product, are they just purchased off of the open market or do you have specific suppliers or farmers that you deal with? I am just curious and neither answer will effect a now planned purchase of a bottle of Castries.

3) What was the intention of developing Castries? Were you trying to make a new and interesting mixer, a digestive, or even a unique aperitif?

4) Finally what is your favorite way to enjoy your product?

I look forward to your input on this site and trying Castries.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It was interesting to hear what you said about not needing to keep it cold. I perhaps get overly paranoid about some of my beverages; I always keep vermouth and creme liqueurs, for instance, cold.

I'll have to pass that on to my parents, as I gave them a bottle of Castries this weekend.

I had thought of mixing it with some Starbucks coffee liqueur to make a variant of a "Baby Guinness", or maybe seeing how it'd pair up with Frangelico, but I got lazy and didn't want to put too big of a dent in their "gift" bottle. :lol:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

David,

Welcome and please tell us more about your product, from what I have read it is rather unique. Anyway, it is not like you are trying to market some upscale fancy bottled flavorless vodka, so please sell away. I do have a couple of questions about the product.

1) Being that the peanut is so versatile and there are so many different flavor profiles to it (i.e. roasted, boiled, peanut butter...) what peanut flavor were you trying to achieve with the product?

2) Where are the peanuts from that are included in the product, are they just purchased off of the open market or do you have specific suppliers or farmers that you deal with? I am just curious and neither answer will effect a now planned purchase of a bottle of Castries.

3) What was the intention of developing Castries? Were you trying to make a new and interesting mixer, a digestive, or even a unique aperitif?

4) Finally what is your favorite way to enjoy your product?

I look forward to your input on this site and trying Castries.

Thanks everyone for letting me sit in. Just a quick background. My family is from the Caribbean (Barbados mostly, but I am sort of a Caribbean mutt), and peanut punch is a drink I grew up with. Castries is a contemporary take on this traditional drink. It is very much in the Caribbean "punch style" drinks. The heritage of peanut punch reaches back to West Africa and India (think peanut soup and the beverage tradition of Lassi), while similar creamed peanut applications can also be seen in Mexico, Peru (Ajis) as well as parts of Asia. As for your questions:

1) The peanut is extremely versatile, and we were really trying to maintain flexibility with the product. The notes should be complex, and include a subtle roasted flavor. The goal in flavor was to intrigue peanut lovers, but not overpower those on the fence. Also, a major goal was to stay true to the essence of what peanut punch tastes like (which can be difficult as it varies by island and even household). An finally, the flavor needed to be strong enough (though not overpowering) to stand up to other cocktail ingredients when mixed.

2) The peanuts are grown in the St. Lucian villages of Laborie and Choiseul.

3) Intent. We wanted to make a premium, and complex cream, that could stand alone or help innovate mixability for the category. The heritage and authenticity of the product was important also as we are standing on the shoulders of and existing beverage tradition.

I could talk forever about the intent point. We wanted to make cream relevant in the new cocktail culture (difficult, because there are few cream "classic" cocktails. Some believe its because of when pasteurization occurred in history. Others equate cream with premixed cocktail). We wanted a cream that mixologist and consumers would take seriously. Creams get a bad rap (I think) with some mixologists. With the varied ways that peanuts are used from a culinary perspective, we felt that cocktails that leveraged this tradition could be amazing. Not to mention, peanuts find there way into almost all cuisines. And while the primary relationship we have, as Americans, with peanuts is through ball parks, bar snacks, candy bars, and PB&J's, the peanut really has more to offer. Savory and sweet.

What we didn't want was to create a novelty. I never wanted people to think we looked at the back bar and said, "hmmm, what's missing? Ahhh, peanuts." The product has a unique heritage. It wasn't a lab project.

4) I like the product in different ways, based on my mood (and no, this is not a clever way to tell you about the cocktail range!!!). I have always liked Castries on the rocks. After that, mood dependent, I like a basic mix with a brown spirit (cognac, rum or bourbon. Oh and especially with Wild Turkey American Honey) or the very dessert like application with tawny port and a cream floater. Finally, while they do not appear on the website (which is a bit dated) I like savory applications alot.

At trade shows, we find people like Castries mixed with Patron XO Cafe or Van Gogh Espresso Vodka, in blended drinks, and anything that reminds them of an after school special or childhood favs (PB&J, Peanut Butter Cup, Mary Jane, Satisfaction, etc).

Honestly, I always say, try it on the rocks or with a slight chill first. Your palate will dictate where you go next (sweet or savory). Everyone who loves the texture of creams does not always love sweets or coffee.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks David! Just knowing the history of Castries and the Caribbean heritage helps me get a good idea for some complimentary mixing profiles. I may have to do some experimentation myself . . . :lol:

Cheers,

Marshall

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I got a bottle today and did as David suggested and tried it over ice and have to say that it is quite good on its own. The flavor really is of roasted peanuts. I then tried it with 1 part Castries and 2 parts homemade raspberry infused vodka with a drizzle of Chambord. Next time I will try a one-to-one ratio loose the Chambord and maybe add some egg whites and powder sugar to form a white "bread" layer on top of the cocktail.

Bottom-line, it is good stuff and it is a welcome addition to my bar.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

and more importantly, where can I pick some up?

I picked up a bottle at Central next to Cowgirl Creamery. They have one bottle left.

I am not sure how it would be with ginger beer only because it is creamy. I can see the flavor going with it though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm thinking a combo of rum (Scarlet Ibis), Castries and Allspice Dram with a dash of Angostura would be a very tasty West Indian inspired cocktail. Now just have to get some Castries or steal some of Sean's . . . :lol:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

David, could you please share some of your more savory recipes? I don't know why, but I'd like to see how it goes with Ginger Beer... How is it with spiced rum? Thanks!

and more importantly, where can I pick some up?

I think Bassin's has some of this, at least they did a couple of months back.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

David, could you please share some of your more savory recipes? I don't know why, but I'd like to see how it goes with Ginger Beer... How is it with spiced rum? Thanks!

and more importantly, where can I pick some up?

Hey guys, I am back from paper work hell. Good to see some people have picked Castries up, and that there are some great questions floating around.

I will tackle ginger/ginger beer and spiced rum first. Both mix well, but in different ways. In terms of ginger or ginger beer, it is a very natural mix with peanut. Both asian and caribbean (spanish and british). I can share a recipe that we have not posted on the site yet that I found super refreshing (Created by Jerri Banks). It uses a ginger tea as well as carbonation, but could probably use a good ginger beer (Barristers, D&G, Regatta...there are plenty of other great ones too).

Gingerly Castries

2 ozs Castries Peanut Rum Creme

2 slices fresh ginger

1 ½ oz Ginger Tea

1 oz Seltzer

Garnish: Stave of fresh ginger

In mixing glass, muddle one slice fresh ginger. Add Castries, ginger tea and ice. Shake well and strain over ice into highball glass. Top with seltzer and garnish with remaining thin stave of ginger.

Making Ginger Tea

Slice ginger into 1/8 inch strips. Muddle gently to release scent and some liquid. Pour 2 cups of hot water over ¼ cup ginger and let steep until cool. Strain and refrigerate.

Spiced rum works well also in a simple 2 to 1 mix (2 parts Castries). I'd go with your favorite spiced rum or spiced dram. Not difficult to make, but the spice components will be complex (which can be good and bad). Using cracked ice in a glass and pouring the shaken combo over it will allow the flavors to open and the combo to dilute mildly over time. You may even find the 2nd and 3rd sips more enjoyable and refined than the first.

As for savory, I would suggest doing this before trying a savory Castries cocktail: try Castries with a pinch of kosher salt. Seriously. Either on the rim, on your tongue, or in the drink itself. If you like the way it enhances the roasted peanut flavor, or makes you remember savory peanut applications, or just adds a balance to the cream and vanilla, then a savory cocktail may be for you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm thinking a combo of rum (Scarlet Ibis), Castries and Allspice Dram with a dash of Angostura would be a very tasty West Indian inspired cocktail. Now just have to get some Castries or steal some of Sean's . . . :lol:

Let me know how this turns out. The use of the allspice dram should work well (very Caribbean). I am excited to try it. When you get the proportions right, please share.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm thinking a combo of rum (Scarlet Ibis), Castries and Allspice Dram with a dash of Angostura would be a very tasty West Indian inspired cocktail. Now just have to get some Castries or steal some of Sean's . . . :lol:

This is what I am drinking now:

1 1/2 oz Home Infused Ginger Vodka

1 1/2 oz Castries

1/2 oz Allspice Dram

1/2 oz Velvet Falernum

2 Dashes Fee Brothers Barrel aged bitters

Hmm... It works quite well, the VF adds a nice complexity.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Came up with this last night and it turned out really nice. Just need a name for it . . .

2oz Castries

1oz amber/dark rum

.25 oz Allspice Dram

.25 oz rich simple syrup

2 healthy dashes of Angostura bitters

a small pinch of kosker salt

Shake everything with ice and strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish is a small dusting of crushed peanuts.

Cheers,

Marshall

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...