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Very excited to make my first brisket today. Found a recipe for a coffee & spice rubbed brisket that I modified a bit. I screwed up right off the bat having the pan a little too hot for searing leaving the spice rub a bit burnt in spots, but my major faux pas that I realized an hour in was I thought that my oven was on 350 when it was on 400. :( Am wondering how badly I've screwed it up, sigh.

Not to mention I also had a country pate in there. #notagoodcookingday

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Very excited to make my first brisket today. Found a recipe for a coffee & spice rubbed brisket that I modified a bit. I screwed up right off the bat having the pan a little too hot for searing leaving the spice rub a bit burnt in spots, but my major faux pas that I realized an hour in was I thought that my oven was on 350 when it was on 400. :( Am wondering how badly I've screwed it up, sigh.

Not to mention I also had a country pate in there. #notagoodcookingday

(It's the lack of booze thanks to your whole 30 that is doing you in...)

I did a crockpot brisket on Friday. Onions, chicken broth, salt, apple cider vinegar and garlic. Lovely and it couldn't have been simpler. The little guy was dubious and it declared it better than pork chops. It wasn't my grandmother's brisket but my grandmother's brisket involved Lipton Onion Soup Mix...

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:lol: If nothing else I think I burn myself less cooking sober. ;)

The brisket actually turned out really well. I modified this recipe to make it paleo-friendly. If anyone is interested in the modifications, let me know. A key change not related to it being paleo is that I used rogan josh instead of ras el hanout because I was itching to try the former and didn't have the latter. Was really good on top of cauliflower puree.

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Does anyone have suggestions for a good way to reheat my leftovers without ruining the beef? I'll be eating this for at least a couple more meals. Options are to slice the meat and quickly pan fry it and reheat the sauce separately, to rewarm it in a pan in the sauce after slicing, to cut a chunk of it off and rewarm in the sauce in the oven, then slice, or...

Thoughts?

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(It's the lack of booze thanks to your whole 30 that is doing you in...)

I did a crockpot brisket on Friday. Onions, chicken broth, salt, apple cider vinegar and garlic. Lovely and it couldn't have been simpler. The little guy was dubious and it declared it better than pork chops. It wasn't my grandmother's brisket but my grandmother's brisket involved Lipton Onion Soup Mix...

I make the Coca Cola brisket using Liptons! A can of coke, an envelope of Liptons and a jar of chili sauce. That's it and it's really delicious, especially over a bed of sliced onions and green bell peppers.

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On 5/31/2019 at 9:50 AM, Dr. Delicious said:

Hey, any good brisket recipes out there?

I've never made one before, and I don't have a smoker, but would like to give it a go.

What do you have? An oven, presumably. Do you have an outdoor grill of any kind? Do you have an immersion circulator?

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2 minutes ago, Dr. Delicious said:

I only have the basics: oven (with convection ability, if it matters) and an outdoor grill.

What kind of grill? Gas or charcoal? What size? Shape? 

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OK, so for a decent brisket, you need a low heat source and a lot of time. Aim for a cooking temp of around 225 degrees, and 1 to 1 1/2 hours per pound. It's done at an internal temperature of 195 to 205 degrees. So yes, an oven is your best bet.

Smoke is great for brisket. If you think you'd be able to keep your grill at 200 - 250, or a little more, for 2-3 hours, there are several methods of getting smoke in a gas grill. I would hit YouTube and see what people are recommending for grills like yours, and figure out if you can do it. 

So, if you can smoke on your grill, smoke your brisket for 2-3 hours. Hickory is a common brisket wood. If you want a strong smoke flavor, hickory works. To lighten it up, mix it with oak, which is a milder taste. Personally, I like fruit woods. Apple, cherry, or a mix. After smoking, wrap the brisket in foil and put it in a preheated 225 oven. Total cooking time 1 to 1 1/2 hours per pound, but briskets vary wildly, so check the temperature early. Usually there's a stall at around 160 degrees that can last a while, and the temperature climbs quickly once it gets past that. 195 to 205 internal temperature is your target.

If you're able to smoke, then for your first brisket, go basic - salt and pepper only. That plus smoke is all the flavor you need. You can add to that next time, once you know what the results are. Add the S&P at least four hours before cooking, or up to 12 hours.

If you can't smoke your brisket, then cook it in the oven uncovered for a couple of hours, then cover it with foil (or wrap it) for the rest of the cooking time. But you'll need to use a rub with a lot more flavor to make up for lack of smoke. Something like this would work:

2 tablespoons kosher salt
1 tablespoon coarsely ground pepper
1/2 to 1 tablespoon cumin, depending on how much you like it
2 tablespoons smoked paprika
1 tablespoon ground chipotle
1 tablespoon brown sugar (whatever variety you prefer)

The paprika and chipotle will add some smoke flavor. And if you can find a decent smoked salt, that will help too. Modify the rub freely. Garlic, onion or both would be tasty additions, but you know your own taste preferences. Mix it, rub it all over the brisket. Some people rub yellow mustard on the meat first to help the rub stick, but I've never found that necessary. Rub it 4 to 12 hours before cooking. If you don't use all of the rub on the brisket, add more right before cooking.

After you hit the target temp, bring it out and let it rest a minimum of 1/2 hour. If you're not serving right away, keep it in the foil and wrap it in a towel to stay warm. Finish it on a hot grill to restore the bark if you smoked it (the foil will kill it), or to approximate a bark if you didn't.

It's good to have some barbecue sauce on hand in case the brisket turns out dry, but otherwise it's entirely optional.

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I would also suggest starting with a brisket flat, which will probably be about 4-8lbs, rather than a whole packer brisket which could weigh 12-18lbs. The flat will cook more uniformly (not to mention much more quickly). 

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Quick question for @agm, or others, regarding how to cook: when slow cooking in an oven using a roasting pan, should I use a rack in the roasting pan or just lay it flat on the bottom of the pan itself?

I'm using the rub agm suggested above (also added 1 tbsp each of onion and garlic powder).

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On 6/14/2019 at 9:01 AM, Dr. Delicious said:

Quick question for @agm, or others, regarding how to cook: when slow cooking in an oven using a roasting pan, should I use a rack in the roasting pan or just lay it flat on the bottom of the pan itself?

I'm using the rub agm suggested above (also added 1 tbsp each of onion and garlic powder).

Sorry I didn't see this earlier. Actually, a rack in the roasting pan would be a great idea, and I would even recommend adding some water to the pan to help keep it from drying out. Another moisture-adding trick would be to spray it with diluted apple cider (or some would use diluted apple cider vinegar), starting at about 3 hours and repeating every hour or so. And cook it fat-side up.

Looks tasty!

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Some Costcos sell packer cuts and some don’t, so you may want to check around. My husband has bought packer cuts of brisket at the DC and Columbia, MD, Costcos recently (within the last few weeks — so I suppose something could have very recently changed). Our closest Costco (Wheaton, MD) doesn’t sell packer cuts.

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19 hours ago, reedm said:

I'm looking for a source that sells packer briskets. Costco used to sell them, but no more. Local would be fine, and I'm fine with buying them online as well. Cheers.

You can probably order through Stachowski or Springfield Butcher.

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A favorite recipe is lesso o allesso

1 1/2 kg beef brisket
carrots
onions
celery
7-10 black peppercorns
2 bay leaves
Italian parsley
salt
water

IMG_9280.thumb.JPG.c14d301f86ca0a044e3d8fc43cd36c78.jpg.4cd0f95bb9b762b07f46fc3fe2990748.jpg

IMG_9282.thumb.JPG.bf4da08d122410c2cee98f96be6a5154.jpg.ef83422419a2697eb834502ca811ba8a.jpg

IMG_9288.thumb.JPG.d28bd6a0552019f43109456cada09cf1.jpg.89b8c60d1170666e48e54ad45eeb7023.jpg

IMG_9290.thumb.JPG.fc5d5567084db507fba88a498b20ec85.jpg.ad49941a77060ddccd3566fb2b807013.jpg

IMG_9295.thumb.JPG.076d8b793a644069772237a39f03a8c8.jpg.d4b34d9977337e6ee7f1151ffe40daf5.jpg

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IMG_9344.JPG.94b3ea00db3fe7845505e9dcec435d80.jpg.48a2b7564318f39b640fba76c0fc4855.jpg

The broth in which the beef and vegetables simmer is served as a first course. The beef and vegetables are a second course, served with either salsa verde or salsa rossa.

Leftovers are perfect in sandwiches.

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