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Poussin


mdt
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Bought a couple nice poussin from EcoFriendly this past weekend and want suggestions on how to prepare them. I have never cooked them before and figure that you all will have some great recommendations.

BTW, speaking of EcoFriendly why is everyone so afraid of buying the goat?

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Bought a couple nice poussin from EcoFriendly this past weekend and want suggestions on how to prepare them. I have never cooked them before and figure that you all will have some great recommendations.

BTW, speaking of EcoFriendly why is everyone so afraid of buying the goat?

Frog them and grill them under a brick.

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Bought a couple nice poussin from EcoFriendly this past weekend and want suggestions on how to prepare them. I have never cooked them before and figure that you all will have some great recommendations.
SPATCHCOCK!!!!

That's what I did with mine last night, because I wanted it to cook faster. I had soaked it for about 6 hours in an herb brine (salt/sugar, onion, thyme, bay, celery leaf, parsley and lavender), and then before throwing it on the grill, I rubbed it with olive oil and sprinkled on a spice mix that I make and use on grilled meat (Spanish paprika, onion and garlic powders, kosher salt, black pepper, brown sugar, cumin, oregano powder and ancho chile).

BTW, speaking of EcoFriendly why is everyone so afraid of buying the goat?

Americans are not accustomed to eating goat, and they imagine that it will taste strong and gamey. But young goat is really just like lamb. I bought a little goat leg roast on Sunday, and I'm planning to cook it tonight.

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SPATCHCOCK!!!!

(Man, I just love that word)

I don't know where I picked this up, but for some reason I've always thought "frog" and "spatchcock" are synonyms. Could it be that Julia Child used the former in describing the technique in MTAOFC? (Though I must say the sound of Julia uttering "spatchcock" must have been delicious.) Yet the OED and other dictionaries do not list this meaning for "frog." I suppose it could be a culinary adaptation of "frog" based on the loop and button closure of that name and referring to the drumsticks of the bird being slipped through slits in the breast skin. Can someone enlighten me?

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Spatchcocked they were. I marinated them in a garlicky herb mixture and roasted them. Served them with some barley risotto and a beet salad. A tasty dinner.

Thanks for the suggestions.

Sounds very good! By the way, I found out I picked up "frog" from Madeleine Kamman's "New Making of a Cook", where she uses this word for "spatchcock" (because the chicken resembles a frog when it's prepped this way).

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