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Shenandoah Farms, Allen and Debbie Sinclair, Mount Jackson, Virginia


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I stumbled upon this farm by way of a posting on a mom-listserve and I am really glad I did. An enthusiastic mom organized a Spring CSA for Arlington families. I ended up splitting a family share ($180) with another family, since my friend is equally enthusiastic in eating more local and less chemically-processed foods.

The farm is owned by Allen and Debbie Sinclair, who are a nice, down-to-earth friendly couple who have shown up at every pickup so far (only started two weeks ago), greeting with warm smiles.

They grow year-round, so this means some hydroponic gardening. At first, I was a little hesitant, because I don't know if I'd be getting hydroponic or garden growth, but after two weeks of eating their butter lettuce, asparagus and now spinach, I feel good that I made a sound, budget-conscious choice for eating for the better for my family.

I have not tried their beef, but I also like that they help other local producers (i.e., Homestead milk), advertising their wares as options to purchase a la carte in addition to the weekly CSA.

SHENANDOAH FARMS, INC.

1167 Crooked Run Road

Mt. Jackson, Virginia 22842

Telephone (540) 477-9794

Fax (540) 477-9223

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They also have a small shop on Virginia Rt. 263, a road known as Orkney Grade, which is the road that runs from Mt. Jackson to Bryce Mountain Resort, Basye, and Orkney Springs. The shop is roughly 1/3 of the way from Mt. Jackson to Bryce. The shop is open year round, seven days a week. They sell quality dairy and eggs, as well as frozen meats, fruits, and vegetables that they produce. Sometimes they have duck's eggs. They also carry the extraordinary cured pork products from Turner Ham House in Fulks Run, VA, or at least they have in the past.

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They grow year-round, so this means some hydroponic gardening.

Did they tell you they have hydroponic beds for growing lettuce in water year-round? If so, I am sure there will be more botanical riches than that since cabbage, kale and such thrive after frost in the winter. Developed in New England back in the day, high tunnels permit a wide variety of other vegetables to grow in soil for year-round harvesting. Greenhouses, too. Root vegetables store...

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