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1900 Cháteau Margaux


Sthitch
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I had just enjoyed a wonderful meal at Corduroy and did not feel like heading home so my wife and I decided to walk to the Four Seasons for another drink. I jokingly said to my wife that if we see my friend Steve’s Lexus in front of Marcel’s, we have to stop and say hello. Steve is a very close friend of Robert Weidmeir, and dines at Marcel’s quite often. Low and behold park right outside of the Marcel’s was his Lexus. My plan was to say hello, my wife knew better. She knew that once we were together drinking would ensue. I had no idea what I was about to experience.

I stepped into Marcel’s and saw that not only my friend Steve was at a table, but so was my friend Eliot, who owns one of the best wine stores in the city. They were only two of ten at the table, and I chose the right time to arrive. This dinner was being held by the host to share some of the wonderful wines he has in his cellar, and my wife and I were invited to stay by the host and his wife. The first glass of wine we received was a 1900 Margaux. Yes that’s right, a 106 year old bottle of wine. Who would have thought that a wine this old could taste this young? It still had ample acid, and ripe fruit. This was as close to a perfect wine as I have ever tasted. The next wine that arrived in front of me was a 1961 LaTour. This was another one of those wines that most people only dream of tasting, and after having it, I will dream of having it again. The body of this was velveteen, like the Margaux, the fruit was still ripe and the nose was almost overpowering. To finish this flight we had a 1983 Cheval Blanc. Had this wine been served on its own, or with lesser wines, it would have shown itself to be an amazing wine; however, it suffered from the competition. It was a fabulous wine, but compared to the other two it seemed almost disjointed.

To finish dinner, we were treated to two vintage ports from Fonseca. The first was a 1948. I wish I could say that this was a wonderful port, but it wasn’t. This was a very incoherent wine, there was an intense amount of alcohol on the nose, and the wine was not very pleasing in the mouth. But the next wine, the 1977, was much different; it was well balanced, with a wonderful flavor encased in a light body. This port was truly a joy to drink.

It was fun to watch the other diners around this table watch as each new bottle was opened. While the 1948 Fonseca was being uncorked, five other tables turned to watch what was happening. One of the other guests stopped by the table, just to look at one of the bottles, he was offered a glass of the Margaux, and it appears that a new friendship had been made. This was one hell of a night, and I am sure that it is going to be many years before I am able to enjoy wines of this caliber, I am thankful for the host and his wife’s invitation to join them, and the luck of not just going home after dinner.

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Good Lord, what an evening! They say that timing is everything, and you certainly showed how rewarding good timing can be!

You WALKED from Corduroy to the Four Seasons? That's a heck of a hike, and after a full meal, too. I'd have taken a taxi in a heartbeat.

I'd have given a significant body part to taste that '61 Latour. The idea of the 1900 Margaux is fascinating, and it's wonderful to know that it held up so well, but I'm not sure how well I could really "enjoy" it, as I have no frame of reference for wines that ancient. I think my overal impression would have been one of simple relief that A) It wasn't corked and :lol: that it wasn't dead.

Thanks for sharing this incredible experience.

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One option no one has mentioned is Chinatown. I often walk there from my little slice of culinary hell on 1st St. NE, to get a pizza at Matchbox, or order Chinese and then either hop on the Metro back, or walk (depending on the weather, and what I ordered). But then again, I have been known to follow-up a meal at Corduroy by walking to Marcel's for a glass or two of wine.

I'm sure the 1900 Margaux was worth the trek!!

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I'm sure the 1900 Margaux was worth the trek!!
Yes, it was worth the trek, but had I known what was in store for me, I would have walked faster and not missed the 1992 Screaming Eagle (I understand that it was OK for a California wine :unsure: ).
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