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Quail Eggs


Anna Blume
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Okay, so I brought some of these home, now nearly two weeks ago. While chefs love having Sand Hill Farms (Penn Quarter, etc.) as a local source for very fresh quail eggs, I am hanging on to mine a bit too long.

Just not all that inspired. What would you do that is simple and doesn't require a whole mess of exotica?

So far I am leaning towards a Salade Lyonnaise studded w tiny poached eggies. My hands are wee, but fingers nimble enough for devilled eggs? :lol:

O suckers?*

*French. Not insult.

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Deviled quail eggs might work with a piping bag. I've also seen the little halves simply decorated with various things for hors d'oeuvres - caviar comes to mind. I really like the idea of the tiny poached eggs. Maybe over asparagus. Or wilted spinach. Or toast.

I've seen them at the Asian supermarkets. Is that where you got yours? We had them when I was a kid and my Grandmother raised quail, but I never actually did anything with one. I have heard that the shells are pretty tough, so you have to be careful breaking them open.

Edited to say - whoops - I just reread that you got them from local farmers.

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Deviled quail eggs might work with a piping bag. I've also seen the little halves simply decorated with various things for hors d'oeuvres - caviar comes to mind. I really like the idea of the tiny poached eggs. Maybe over asparagus. Or wilted spinach. Or toast.

I've seen them at the Asian supermarkets. Is that where you got yours? We had them when I was a kid and my Grandmother raised quail, but I never actually did anything with one. I have heard that the shells are pretty tough, so you have to be careful breaking them open.

Edited to say - whoops - I just reread that you got them from local farmers.

The shells are definitely hard given how small the egg is inside. It isn't a problem if you are hard cooking them, but to poach or fry them you do risk breaking the yolk. I use a small knife to pry it open after cracking it. Does anyone else have a better method?

I buy them at Han Ah Rheum on Lee Highway. $3.99 for 18.

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It's real easy. Put your eggs in the pot and put equal amounts of cold water and vinegar until they are covered. The vinegar makes them easy to peel. Bring to a boil and then boil for 5 minutes.

They are real easy to crack open, you can squeeze them with your fingers to get it started.

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It's real easy. Put your eggs in the pot and put equal amounts of cold water and vinegar until they are covered. The vinegar makes them easy to peel. Bring to a boil and then boil for 5 minutes.

They are real easy to crack open, you can squeeze them with your fingers to get it started.

Thanks for the vinegar tip! I'll get some next trip.

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