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How To Cook Your Life


legant
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Any interest in a dr.com outing to see this documentary that explores the "principles of Zen Buddhism as they apply to the preparation of food as well as life itself."

One week only (starts Friday, December 7) at the E Street Cinema

Suggested date and time: Sunday, December 9 @ 4:00-ish. Dinner afterwards.

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Sunday the 9th at 4 would probably work for me. I'd like to see that film. The *Tassajara Bread Book* really is a flashback to the early 70's for me. A couple of the other influential books from those days aren't of any interest to me any more--Francis Moore Lappé's *Diet for a Small Planet* and Adelle Davis' abominable "health food" recipes are no longer on my shelf, but *The Tassajara Bread Book* is still with me. Edward Espe Brown is the author.

(edited to omit references to lack of author's name inside the book. The title page was in fact glued to another, so that last night I didn't see the author's name which appears prominently on it. DOH!)

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I saw this film when it was at SilverDocs in June. It was very interesting. The "zen" chef was facinating, he is really an interesting character. The film made me want to go home and bake bread, and I know nothing about baking bread.

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I just heard from someone who left early because the film was so boring. She said a number of people in the theater were snoring.

Huh. That's too bad. The trailer sold me on the movie, but this is beginning to sound like a dvd rental. Maybe someone from the site (legant?) needs to go on a fact-finding mission.

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*The Tassajara Bread Book* is still with me. Edward Espe Brown is the author.
I'm not surprised. While I don't own it, I acquired Greens back in grad school and EEB contributed the recipes for baked goods. I've made them all and they're all great. (Deborah Madison used to cook at the monastery where EEB remains.)

The significance given to the ritual of bread-making fascinates me. It was a secularized process for a certain back-to-nature-simpler-times generation who also turned to Beard on Bread, published by the same folk who gave us vegetarian cookbooks by Anna Thomas and Madhur Jaffrey.

But EEB's more famous counterpart, Peter Reinhart, started as the Franciscan Brother Juniper. While he abandoned his religious community for marriage and Johnson & Wales, I wonder if he also saw a meditative quality in the task he performed for the other friars.

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