Jump to content

zoramargolis

Members
  • Content Count

    5,965
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    20

About zoramargolis

  • Rank
    donrocks@aol.com
  • Birthday January 13

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Female
  • Location
    Washington, DC

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. All of Ottolenghi's chicken recipes use the same method. The chicken is mixed with aromatics, vegetables, spices, and other flavoring ingredients first--ideally for a few hours or overnight. And then arrayed in one layer in a baking dish and roasted in a hot oven. The only thing that changes is the marinating and secondary ingredients. You can mix the chicken with the spices and cook immediately if you want, just know that the chicken itself won't be as intensely flavored, and since the salt in the marinade acts as a brine or dry brine would in maintaining moisture in the meat, the chicken may
  2. Hi Smoky-- a former DR.com stalwart alerted me to your post, on Facebook, natch. Yes, I moved to Maine in April, 2015. While my friends in L.A. were sweltering in 100+ degree heat last week--you might have been, too-- I was enjoying the mid-70's, with a gentle breeze off the Sheepscot River behind my house. I've met some local food writers here, and there is a very active farmers market/local agriculture scene here. It's beautiful here. I frankly can't recall my comment about brownies on the NYT--I'll have to go back and read what I said. But thanks for the kudo!
  3. Steve Siegel came to my farewell happy hour at Baby Wale. I was pleased and somewhat surprised to see him. the event was only publicized on DR.com, so unless he heard about it from mutual friends like Daniel or Lydia, he read about it here.
  4. It is probably made with the detritus, broken bits and stems of dried porcini that aren't primo enough to charge the big bucks for. It is much cheaper than buying dried porcini and grinding them up yourself. It is a very fine powder, like wheat flour, that mixes invisibly into whatever. I haven't used it as a steak rub.
  5. For quite a few years, porcini powder has been one of my favorite non-secret "secret ingredients" for adding umami and depth of flavor to soups, braises, and tomato sauces. It's cheaper and easier to use than dried porcinis--no soaking or chopping needed. Don't know if I have ever seen it locally--it'd be at Balducci or Dean and DeLuca if it's available around here. I get it at Kalustyan's in NYC and at Surfas in Culver City (West Los Angeles). Both places sell online. And darkstar965 is correct. I have talked about it here.
  6. Well, thanks so much to everyone who turned up at Baby Wale tonight to hang out, eat, drink, and wish me bon voyage. We also toasted DR.com and our dear leader on the upcoming 10th anniversary of this site. So great to see old friends and more recent ones. Many thanks to Barbara for organizing this. I have many people I consider friends as the result of DR.com, and I will miss you all. And I will stay in touch.
  7. Chinese chicken salad (traditional style by request, including canned mandarin oranges and packaged crispy noodles) a 2011 Muscadet from the back of the wine closet that was still very good
  8. Recently, a friend revealed that he is having a recurrence of leukemia that had long been in remission. I saw him a few days before he was to embark on an experimental treatment at NIH. I promised to cook something for him when I returned from a brief trip up to my new house in Maine. When I asked what he wanted/would be able to eat during the treatment, he said that whatever I wanted to cook was what he wanted to eat. I was thinking comfort food, and since he and his wife are former Texans, I decided to make posole verde for him. I made it yesterday, using pork shoulder and pork ribs from W
  9. I hope to see all of y'all there, so I can say "so long, it's been good to know ya"! That means you, too, DR!
  10. Red Apron chorizo, potato, and roasted poblano tacos pico de gallo home made refried pinto beans Fat Tire BreadFurst chocolate chip cookies and almond milk
  11. oven-braised ayrshire farm short ribs, after 5 days in cooked wine marinade roasted carrots, rutabaga, and butternut squash steamed new potatoes mushroom barley pilaf bosc pear and fig newmans 2009 La Grande Ribe cdr
  12. What do you think about BreadFurst corn rye? I prefer rye bread with lots of caraway seed. And I found it very heavy. YMMV.
  13. Marcella Hazan has a famous recipe for chard stems that are first braised in chicken stock and then baked with parmesan cheese.
  14. An uncle of mine grew up poor on a farm in Poland. He emigrated to Canada as a very young man and some years later married my mother's sister, joining a Belarusian family of good cooks. He always waxed nostalgic about a soup that his mother made, that he had loved when he was growing up. Most of his family had perished in the camps during the war, but eventually, some time in the late fifties or early sixties, my aunt was able to get the recipe from one of his sisters, who had survived and moved to Paris. My Uncle Josef's sister swore that the recipe she sent explained the exact way that their
×
×
  • Create New...