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Goose Breast


1000yregg
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This was right on time. I was given two goose breasts (wild/with birdshot) and Grover and I didn't have any idea what to do with them. Now if someone would like to come up with a recipe for venison tenderloin and goosebreast, I can utilize all the game residing in the freezer.

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Where did you get the breasts? Were they wild hunted or off a farm ?

wild hunted up in Harford county. i think my breast came off a tagged goose, too, so if i try, i can track the flight history of my bird. delicious and educational.

thanks for the recipe, but it might be too complicated for me.

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Having had a Canada goose breast given to me to cook, I can tell you that it needs a lot of help in the flavor and texture department. I would say by all means marinate it in a cooked wine marinade for a few days: simmer a bottle of wine (up to you whether to use red or white for goose, though a light-bodied red would probably be my choice) with aromatics (onion, carrot, celery, fresh herbs --thyme, parsley, bay leaf--and black peppercorns, a couple of cloves, and some juniper berries) for about 15 minutes, then let it sit for about an hour. Strain out the solids and pour the wine over the goose meat in a zip-lock bag. Leave it in the fridge for a couple of days, turning the bag a couple of times a day. (Put the bag into a bowl in case it leaks.)

Plan to cook it draped with some form of fat, like bacon, pancetta or sliced fresh pork belly. Roast it a a fairly low heat until a thermometer registers no more than 140, so that it will be medium-medium rare-ish.

Otherwise it will be fishy-tasting, dry and very tough. Voice of bad experience speaking here.

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Plan to cook it draped with some form of fat, like bacon, pancetta or sliced fresh pork belly. Roast it a a fairly low heat until a thermometer registers no more than 140, so that it will be medium-medium rare-ish.

Otherwise it will be fishy-tasting, dry and very tough. Voice of bad experience speaking here.

thanks for the advice- i figured i'd be wrapping it in bacon or the like since the skin was discarded.

i found a mario batali recipe which also calls for a marinade as well. moisture, got it.

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This was right on time. I was given two goose breasts (wild/with birdshot) and Grover and I didn't have any idea what to do with them. Now if someone would like to come up with a recipe for venison tenderloin and goosebreast, I can utilize all the game residing in the freezer.
For the tenderloin, I'd marinate it overnight in red wine and garlic, then cut it into one-inch sections, wrap each in bacon, and toss on a grill over hardwood charcoal for about two-two-and-a-half minutes a side for medium rare. This is a trusted Eastern Shore method, and it results in a wonderful flavor and texture.
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For the tenderloin, I'd marinate it overnight in red wine and garlic, then cut it into one-inch sections, wrap each in bacon, and toss on a grill over hardwood charcoal for about two-two-and-a-half minutes a side for medium rare. This is a trusted Eastern Shore method, and it results in a wonderful flavor and texture.

Venison tastes so good when there are juniper berries in the marinade.

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