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Pork Loin


Demetrius
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I don't like dry cooking methods for pork loin because most modern pork is so lean that they will simply dry out. My favorite way of preparing it is to season with salt and pepper brown it on all sides in a heavy pot (I use a Le Creuset), pour whole milk so that it is about 1/3 to half way up the meat. Bring milk to a simmer and cover. Turn the meat a quarter of a turn every 10 to 15 minutes until it is finished. While you let the meat rest, use an immersion blender and turn the curdled milk into a savory gravy (a regular blender will also work). It is easy and delicious.

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I don't like dry cooking methods for pork loin because most modern pork is so lean that they will simply dry out. My favorite way of preparing it is to season with salt and pepper brown it on all sides in a heavy pot (I use a Le Creuset), pour whole milk so that it is about 1/3 to half way up the meat. Bring milk to a simmer and cover. Turn the meat a quarter of a turn every 10 to 15 minutes until it is finished. While you let the meat rest, use an immersion blender and turn the curdled milk into a savory gravy (a regular blender will also work). It is easy and delicious.

What you are describing above, pork cooked in milk, or miale al latte in Italy, is also a traditional dish in Switzerland, according to Madeleine Kamman. I learned about it from her first cookbook, which was published in the late 70's. I would reccomend for even better flavor that you saute a mirepoix of onion, carrot and celery (no garlic) before adding the pork and the milk to the pot. And also fresh thyme, Italian parsley and bay leaf. You can fish out the herbs before blending the sauce, and the veggies will get pureed and make the sauce thicker. It's a bit of extra work, but I sometimes strain out the curds and veggies, reduce the broth and add creme fraiche to make the presentation a bit more refined. But in either case it is super delicious.

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I would reccomend for even better flavor that you saute a mirepoix of onion, carrot and celery (no garlic) before adding the pork and the milk to the pot. And also fresh thyme, Italian parsley and bay leaf. You can fish out the herbs before blending the sauce, and the veggies will get pureed and make the sauce thicker ... But in either case it is super delicious.

Zora,

All quite true, but I was trying to keep it simple. :lol:

By the way Garlic does work as whole cloves dropped into the milk and not browned, the milk takes away the sharpness of the garlic, and it blends rather nicely.

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I've made a lovely stuffed one in the past. Macerate some onion chunks and chopped dried apricots in some port for a spell; butterfly loin; spoon in the filling; roll it up, rope it up, roast it up. Reduce the port wine into a nice little sauce. Perfect fit for the weather.

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Although the pork loin doesn't have much fat, if you cook it just until medium it should still be plenty juicy. I usually pan-sear a seasoned loin, put it on an aluminum foil lined baking sheet and get it into a really hot oven to roast until almost medium. While it's roasting, using the same pan (to get that good fond), I saute/brown sliced onions with some thyme and add whatever preserves I have on hand. For example, a cherry preserve works really nicely when accented with chicken stock and some port and perhaps a splash of balsamic.

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I just put one in the crockpot with the following;

1 can cream of mushroom soup

1 can golden mushroom soup

1 can french onion soup

We will find out in four more hours.

It wasn't bad - but very bland - brought it to some life with salt pepper and chipolte.

I was very surprised I always thought Campbells soup had plenty of salt.

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I usually buy tenderloin, but this small 2.7lb roast was on sale and I've never made one before. Does anyone have any ideas?

I got a fairly large one on sale recently and got a few dinners out of it. Simply roasted some, and for others I sliced off slices, pounded them thin, and made schnitzel. Indiana-style breaded pork cutlet is a variation on the schnitzel idea. Serve the cutlet for dinner, or it makes a great sandwich. Mustard and dill pickles. Yum.

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