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Making cheese sauce ahead of time


Choirgirl21
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Need a beer cheese sauce for potato skins I'm making for the super bowl on Sunday. Would like to do as much as I can ahead of time since I'm not hosting. Should I be concerned that if I make the cheese sauce on Saturday that it will separate or otherwise be problematic on Sunday?

Also wondering if it will be problematic if the cheese sauce is only room tempish when I load the skins. They'll get put into the oven just long enough for everything to warm up (making the skins earlier in the day). These particular ones will get the cheese sauce topped with chunks or slices of bratwurst and then a bit of brown mustard when they come out of the oven right before serving.

This is the recipeI was going to use.

Thanks!

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Need a beer cheese sauce for potato skins I'm making for the super bowl on Sunday. Would like to do as much as I can ahead of time since I'm not hosting. Should I be concerned that if I make the cheese sauce on Saturday that it will separate or otherwise be problematic on Sunday?

Also wondering if it will be problematic if the cheese sauce is only room tempish when I load the skins. They'll get put into the oven just long enough for everything to warm up (making the skins earlier in the day). These particular ones will get the cheese sauce topped with chunks or slices of bratwurst and then a bit of brown mustard when they come out of the oven right before serving.

This is the recipeI was going to use.

Thanks!

I'm reading in a hurry, but I see 3 T. of milk in the ingredients, but not in the making of the recipe. If this recipe can be made without milk, I think that'll work out better for prep beforehand because using anything less than heavy cream can lead to curdling and separation if heated too high.

Next, be sure to store the cheese sauce with plastic wrap actually touching the sauce so a skin doesn't form. I'd store in Tupperware or the like, lined with plastic wrap. I think it should reheat first in in the micro, get stirred and re-incorporated before you spoon it over your potatoes. This could even be done Sunday before you go, if it's not too far.

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I'm reading in a hurry, but I see 3 T. of milk in the ingredients, but not in the making of the recipe. If this recipe can be made without milk, I think that'll work out better for prep beforehand because using anything less than heavy cream can lead to curdling and separation if heated too high.

Next, be sure to store the cheese sauce with plastic wrap actually touching the sauce so a skin doesn't form. I'd store in Tupperware or the like, lined with plastic wrap. I think it should reheat first in in the micro, get stirred and re-incorporated before you spoon it over your potatoes. This could even be done Sunday before you go, if it's not too far.

I've had good luck reheating the cheese sauce I use for mac and cheese, slowly over a low flame. Similar ingredients, but more milk and butter, and no beer.

Yes, the one review of the recipe complained about the lack of instruction on what to do with the milk among other things. I got the impression that the milk was to thin the sauce if it was too thick, which I could certainly hold off on doing until I rewarm. One complication with rewarming - the host does not have a microwave. I am really trying to minimize what I have to do at his house so stove top rewarming is not high on my list, but if I have to, it's not the end of the world.

Based on your comments, I think I will give it a shot. Maybe I should buy a jar of cheez wiz to have as backup just in case. :)

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The problem I see with that recipe is that it does not have a bechamel base. Without the flour in the roux at the base of the sauce, the cheese can separate into curds and grease. I would recommend for re-heating purposes, that you look for a different recipe, one that starts with butter and flour, then adds milk and then cheese. You can add extra flavor by making an onion roux--saute some chopped onion in the butter before you add the flour. When it is cooked, stir in some dijon mustard and a dash of garlic powder, to give it more pizzazz.

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This looks very quick to make. I would ask the people in whose kitchen you're going to be if you can mix up and heat there. (Take the cheese already shredded, etc.)

You know, I think I will just do this and save myself the worry of it not working out and then being stuck with a mess. This also solves my dilemma of having already gone to the beer store, but not having bought anything to use in this as there will be plenty of beer there. :) I'll just have to either do it before the game or during half time because I can't miss anything to be in the kitchen (go Stillers!). :)

Thanks everyone!

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The problem I see with that recipe is that it does not have a bechamel base. Without the flour in the roux at the base of the sauce, the cheese can separate into curds and grease. I would recommend for re-heating purposes, that you look for a different recipe, one that starts with butter and flour, then adds milk and then cheese. You can add extra flavor by making an onion roux--saute some chopped onion in the butter before you add the flour. When it is cooked, stir in some dijon mustard and a dash of garlic powder, to give it more pizzazz.

Sans the 3T. of milk that is not accounted for in the instructions, this recipe is like fondue. I've made fondue but don't recall ever reheating the leftovers the next day, but imagine it would stand a chance of loosening up again.

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Sans the 3T. of milk that is not accounted for in the instructions, this recipe is like fondue. I've made fondue but don't recall ever reheating the leftovers the next day, but imagine it would stand a chance of loosening up again.

I actually have reheated fondue the next day. It would have been easier to treat it more as raclette, but with enough gentle heat and stirring, it turned back to melty-cheese goodness.

That said, it took approximately six to seven times as long to regain consistentcy on a reheat as it did to make it live. I don't see the point, unless you happen to have leftovers.

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