Jump to content

The Latest Kobe Beef Deception


DonRocks
 Share

Recommended Posts

Oh Joy, Ketchup. Just a few lovely nuggets from their menu:

SCANDALOUS LOBSTER WRAPS - Two iceberg lettuce cups, chunks of lobster , mango KETCHUP

PARMESAN-GARLIC RING TOWER - thick-cut sweet vidalia onion rings tossed with parmesan & garlic

BARKING DOGS - two mini kobe beef hot dogs

And the pretentious claptrap continues after the "Shared Credit" appetizers.

If Mike Malin, Lonnie Moore, or someone else from Dolce Group can prove that they're using "Kobe beef" at Ketchup in their $9 hot dogs, $10 sliders, $19 sloppy Joe, or $40 eight-ounce filet, I will publicly apologize and donate $1,000 to the charity of their choice.

Until then, I contend that Ketchup restaurant is engaged in questionable advertising.

Incidentally, I noticed that The Source has changed their menu to read "'American Style' Kobe" instead of simply "Kobe." Nice try, but no cigar.

Cheers,

Rocks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Incidentally, I noticed that The Source has changed their menu to read "'American Style' Kobe" instead of simply "Kobe." Nice try, but no cigar.

Cheers,

Rocks.

Sort of like people who say "The only opera I've ever heard is "Phantom of the Opera". Uhhhh, no.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Until then, I contend that Ketchup restaurant is engaged in questionable advertising.

Incidentally, I noticed that The Source has changed their menu to read "'American Style' Kobe" instead of simply "Kobe." Nice try, but no cigar.

Cheers,

Rocks.

With noise levels in popular restaurants threatening the health and well-being of the American People, how can we be concerned with such trivialities as whether the latest breathlessly gushed-over trends and trendy spots are actively deceiving diners?

Besides, for any one to point out that non-Japanese Wagyu is inferior to top-quality Hereford or Angus would require actual knowledge and would risk losing one's trendy status.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Besides, for any one to point out that non-Japanese Wagyu is inferior to top-quality Hereford or Angus would require actual knowledge and would risk losing one's trendy status.

And as you know, it's not just non-Japanese Wagyu; I've had lower grades of Wagyu from Japan that are absolutely inferior to a decent cut of domestic beef.

Just like ... the best Pinot Noir might come from France, but there's plenty of French Pinot Noir that pales next to a good domestic version, etc.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just like ... the best Pinot Noir might come from France, but there's plenty of French Pinot Noir that pales next to a good domestic version, etc.

The difference being that wine is routinely evaluated by knowledgeable professionals.

And, no one is trying to sell a domestically produced La Tache--and if there were such a thing, the public and the critics would certainly have something to say about it, and it wouldn't be breathlessly repeated hype, would it?

And the sommelier who tried to push it on his guests as La Tache, at inflated prices, would lose a little standing, don't you think?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And, no one is trying to sell a domestically produced La Tache--and if there were such a thing, the public and the critics would certainly have something to say about it, and it wouldn't be breathlessly repeated hype, would it?
Korbel seems to do fine selling California Champagne. Much is sold in restaurants, although I doubt the trendy ones sell very much of it. Kraft Parmesan probably outsell the real thing by about as much as McDonalds does to "real burgers".
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Korbel seems to do fine selling California Champagne. Much is sold in restaurants, although I doubt the trendy ones sell very much of it.

Does Korbel make a "Clos de Mesnil" that retails for only $359.99, instead of Krug's $699? If so, is Mark Slater pushing it on his list at $595 a bottle? Is the Wine Spectator giving awards to restaurants that do?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Does Korbel make a "Clos de Mesnil" that retails for only $359.99, instead of Krug's $699? If so, is Mark Slater pushing it on his list at $595 a bottle? Is the Wine Spectator giving awards to restaurants that do?
My point being that in today's society where law determines how much of the truth we are told, the US stands alone in shame in allowing time honored place names to be used for fakery. I would never buy anything labeled American Parmesan just on the principle of ripping off another's name, even if it tasted something like the original or even if it was better. American Prosciutto is OK, American Parma Ham should be criminal!
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My point being that in today's society where law determines how much of the truth we are told, the US stands alone in shame in allowing time honored place names to be used for fakery. I would never buy anything labeled American Parmesan just on the principle of ripping off another's name, even if it tasted something like the original or even if it was better. American Prosciutto is OK, American Parma Ham should be criminal!
As was pointed out to me, Parmesan is not the protected name, just the translation of the protected name. If in fact anyone made an american Parmiggiano Reggiano or any variant of that, it would be a violation of the protected names treaties in palace in much of the world. Parmesan is not the protected DOP but it is, in my opinion, just as misleading. Argentina makes Reggianito, which can be a very fine product with proper aging and if it lacks the heavy wax crusts of so many versions. It is an imitation to be sure, but one with its own personality and own characteristics that distinguise it from the original. "Inspired by" instead of "trying to rip you off by"
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The difference being that wine is routinely evaluated by knowledgeable professionals.

And, no one is trying to sell a domestically produced La Tache--and if there were such a thing, the public and the critics would certainly have something to say about it, and it wouldn't be breathlessly repeated hype, would it?

And the sommelier who tried to push it on his guests as La Tache, at inflated prices, would lose a little standing, don't you think?

I'm pretty sure that, given enough time and title space, I could merge every post on this website into a single thread. :wacko::blink:

Does Korbel make a "Clos de Mesnil" that retails for only $359.99, instead of Krug's $699? If so, is Mark Slater pushing it on his list at $595 a bottle? Is the Wine Spectator giving awards to restaurants that do?

My cull and rum: beef whore, Marx later.

The part at 7:30 brings back tender memories of Don Ho and the Bethesda Marriott Kona Kai.

I do hope nobody takes this post as anything more than me being silly.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...