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deangold

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About deangold

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    Van Lingle Mungo
  • Birthday 08/29/1957

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    http://www.DinosGrotto.com

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    Male
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    Opera, Sondheim, wine
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    Annandale Adjacent

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  1. Cross posting this from the Dinner thread because it is the cocktail portion of our dinner: After dinner: DC Sazerac: We have a couple of bottles of Burrough Bourbon from Republic Restoratives. It is not a great sipping bourbon but it makes for nice cocktails. Given that it is a high rye mashbill bourbon, I decided to try it in a Sazerac. Kay and I has slight variations on each other's drink Kay's: 2 oz bourbon, Suze rinse, sugar cube, peychauds aromatic bitters {4 or so dashes,} 2 dashes Peychaud's whiskey barrel bitters and a 1" dropper full of Bitterman's Orange Cream Citrate bitters. Mine: 2 oz bourbon, Dimmi rinse, sugar cube, 6 dashes Peychaud's aromatic bitters, 2 droppers 1" full of the Bitterman's orange citrate bitters, a healthy dosing of The Bitter Truth peach bitters. The doser on The Bitter Truth is stingy, making giving amounts used difficult. Comparison: Kay's was a little harsher, mine more aromatic with the peach adding an undertone and not a distinctve peach flavor. Notes: On the bitters: the Peychaud's bitters were added first to the sugar cube and muddled. Then upon tasting the drink, I add more bitters depending on what I think it needs. The orange citrate bitters add smoothness to a cocktail made with brown spirits so they went in to fight the harshness. When I made mine and doubled the orange citrate, the nose became washed out but the drink was far smoother. SO I tried my new Peach Bitters to see where it would go. I added about 6 shakes, tasted, then added about 6 more. As I say in my signature box: Bitters make the cocktail. We now have 15 different bitters for loads of experimentation.
  2. We have a whole local pork loin cut up in the freezer. The pork comes from a siingle farm in Greencastle MD and is a duroc/Berkshire cross. We got 6 bone in chops, 6 boneless steaks and a couple of roasts. Earlier, I took out the sirloin roast. After it thawed, I boned out the hip bone and there were feather bones from the loin end too. Next I cut it in half horizontally to make one of the pieces flat. Next I rubbed all the meat with a lot of garlic, sage, rosemary, salt, black pepper, Aleppo pepper, & olive oil. I put the meat in a bag to marinate in the fridge for 4 days. Today, I took out the meat and laid the smaller piece on top of the flat piece and tied it into an even roast. I put a probe thermometer in it and set it on the counter. When I was finished tying the roast, it read 48 degrees. two hours later is read 53 degrees confirming that leaving meat out to warm up isn't effective. I put the roast in the oven at 220 degrees and left it until it reached 160. I removed it and let is rest for 30 minutes or so and then put it in a 500 degree oven bottom up for 4 or 5 minutes, then flipped it for 3 so it was nicely browned all over. Then I deglazed the fond in the roasting pan with white wine while I cooked off some capers in olive oi in a separate skillet. When the roasting pan was fully deglazed I strained the juices into the capers. Then I reduced that and added a little home made fermented grainy mustard, sesame oil and Iwashi fish sauce. I spooned this over the sliced meat. To accompany, I blanched kalettes which are the tips of a kale plant much like the brussels srout top has a loose head at the top. We iced them, sauteed garlic and tossed in the kalettes. A little lime juice, salt, pepper & spice rub finished it. Wine: 1984 Caymus Cabernet from back in the day when Caymus made traditional style cabs: not too ripe, aged in american oak after some time in large tank. This is basically the style pioneered by Louis Martini. Now days, Caymus is made with lots of relatively new French Oak and tasted like most other Napa cabs. This was funky and quite ripe from the 84 vintage, not from late picking. the flavors and mouth impressions were of a fine old cab, pretty fully mature. The nose has touch of hot vintage funk you get in 45 year old cabs from hot vintages. We have had about a dozen California cabs from the 1980's now and they have all been in fine condition age wise and the vintage variations are quite apparent and drive the wines. So the canard that Cali cabs of the 80s don't age because of their old school wine making is a bucket of duck spit. After dinner: DC Sazerac: We ahve a couple of bottles of Burrough Bourbon from Republic Restoratives. It is not a great sipping bourbon but it makes for nice cocktails. Given that it is a high rye mashbill bourbon, I decided to try it in a Sazerac. Kay and I has slight variations on each other's drink Kay's: 2 oz bourbon, Suze rinse, sugar cube, peychauds aromatic bitters {4 or so dashes,} 2 dashes Peychaud's whiskey barrel bitters and a 1" dropper full of Bitterman's Orange Cream Citrate bitters. Mine: 2 oz bourbon, Dimmi rinse, sugar cube, 6 dashes Peychaud's aromatic bitters, 2 droppers 1" full of the Bitterman's orange citrate bitters, a healthy dosing of The Bitter Truth peach bitters. The doser on The Bitter Truth is stingy, making giving amounts used difficult. Comparison: Kay's was a little harsher, mine more aromatic with the peach adding an undertone and not a distinctve peach flavor. Notes: On the bitters: the Peychaud's bitters were added first to the sugar cube and muddled. Then upon tasting the drink, I add more bitters depending on what I think it needs. The orange citrate bitters add smoothness to a cocktail made with brown spirits so they went in to fight the harshness. When I made mine and doubled the orange citrate, the nose became washed out but the drink was far smoother. SO I tried my new Peach Bitters to see where it would go. I added about 6 shakes, tasted, then added about 6 more. As I say in my signature box: Bitters make the cocktail. We now have 15 different bitters for loads of experimentation.
  3. Outstanding gin that. I just picked up a bottle of Plymouth at 15% off so special ordering a Ford's will have to wait.
  4. Very nice Valentine's Day meal with Kay. I got a couple of dabs from H Mart. The pair was about 2-1/2 pounds whole and they cleaned and gutted them. I am familiar with sand dabs from California but these were larger. As it turned out, they had roe as well. Dabs ae a flat fish much like a flounder but smaller. I sprinkled them with salt and pepper and griddled them about 10 minutes. While they were cooking, I made a sauce: sauteed capers & red onion is half and half butter & olive oil. Added white wine and thyme and cooked untilt he raw wine taste disappeared. Then mounted with a bit of butter to leave it emilsified but runny. I had meant to use lime juice as well so we just poured the lime juice over the butter sauce covered fish. They wound up needing salt at the table. The flesh is soft, close to but short of mushy. It was moist and delicate in flavor, but rich from the butter. The roe sacks were prefect, a little done on the outside where they were near the griddle and soft and just warmed in the center. The roe was a super bonus and I am fairly sure the roe season is pretty short. Our veggie was brussels sprouts steamed and then pan fried, seasoned with spice rub, salt and pepper. We finished up with a decadent pistachio cookie from a bakery downtown, Nino's is the name, I think. Drinks: Kay had a spin on a Corpse Reviver: citrus & blackberry infused gin, Cocchi Americano, Triplum, lime juice served in a glass with a Suze rinse {replacing the absinthe.} I started with a Gin Gimlet: 2 oz Bombay Sapphire and 3/4 oz Andrew's lime cordial, stirred served up. With dinner we enjoyed the rest of our bottle of kikusui sake. After dinner, and after cookie, we shared a Sazerac made with Old Overholt. I chilled the glass and gave it a Suze rinse. I then muddled a sugar cube with 4 dashes of Peychaud's aromatic bitters and 3 of Peychaud's Whiskey Barrel Bitters. Added 3 oz old Overholt. The sazerac is fast becoming my favorite warming cocktail. I am going to invest in a bottle of HerbSaint for both my Sazeracs and Corpse Revivers.
  5. Quick lunch today. Just an order of Fiery Pot Lamb. I have had beef and fish before, this is my first time with lamb. I just ordered it from the menu and did not specify hot. The lamb is a little chewier than the beef but is also very rich. I would not have minded a few more slices of lamb. The broth is fiery hot, without being overbearing hot. But it is one of the spicier dishes I have had in a while. The broth comes fillled with bean sprouts and cabbage. As is typical in Szechuan dishes, there is a slick of oil on the top of the dish but the dish itself is not greasy at all. Panda Gourmet hit it out of the park with this dish. Need to go back with a group to get a good cross section of the menu.
  6. Dungeness Crab bought live and steamed at home. Aside from listening to the crab say "I've got a wife and 250,000 fertilized eggs back home, the whole process was easy. Steamed it 15 minutes in a large pot {my canning pot using the canning rack to hole the crab out of the water/} Served with with veganaise, the tomalley & lemon juice. Last of the leftover tri tip, this the shio koji marinated one. Superb cold. Tangy, sweet, meaty. Beets marinated in sherry wine vinegar w/slivered onion. Bread First drink: Corpse Reviver #2 with Dimmi liqueur standing in for Absinthe. Bombay sapphire, cocchi, lemon juice, triplum 1 oz ea Luxardo cherry garnish.Grapefruit & hops bitters from bitterman's 2nd drink was not as good: Brokers Gin, Cocchi, triplum, sweet lime which I thought was going to be like a Rangpur. Instead it was sugar sweet. Had to add 1/2 oz lemon juice and still too sweet. Bitterman's Grapefruit bitters helped a little. Bitter Truth Lemon bitters helped more. No cherry garnish. Weird but I drank it.
  7. I just got a new shipment of bitters: From the Bitter Truth I got a 5 small bottle pack of olive, peach, cucumber, chocolate & tonic bitters. Samples off my fingers, they are simply delicious with the exception of the tonic bitters. Maybe in a drink, they will be better. The last addition is Bitterman's hopped grapefruit bitters which I have always love but our bottle at the Grotto was Andrew's. Peach and Chocolate will be great in Manhattans. Olive I can see not only in martinis but other lighter drinks. It is more herbs than olives from a finger. The cucumber in Last Word or Corpse Reviver spins.
  8. You know I like you but this is wrong. Triplum yes or some other interesting orange thing. But the 1-1-1-1 gin world is amazing from Corpse Reviver to Last word. Actually, shold the Last Word should precede the Corpse Reviver?
  9. Duck cannelloni out of the freezer w/freezer local heirloom tomato sauce & parm. Sliced koji rice aged steak, cold, sliced thin. Green herb, garlic & yogurt sauce Left over radish etc green pickles. Thai banana Crudite w/sun dried tomato, garlic & lebne pesto. Drink: rye not so old fashioned: Old overholt, payhaud's whiskey barrel bitters soaked sugar cube, 1/2 slice mandarin, muddled. Really good. Wine: Alcesti Frappato {fruit bomb styles red from Sicily.
  10. 7410 Little River Turnpike Annandale, VA 22003 (703) 256-5737 Small strip mall restaurant serving Korean style Japanese food. Their house special is Katsu. The menu has a small appetizer section of which the Takoyaki is my favorite. Most of the other appetizers are just so-so. The entrees come with a very pleasant chawan mushi. They have the menu divided up into sections: Katsu, Ramen, Udon, Over Rice. Then there are combos. If you order the katsu on a combo, yo get a smaller portion. My favorite is the pork katsu. The pork is not juicy, the breading is crunchy. You can get the pork with grated daikon. You get two pork cutlets, a bit of kimchi, some pickled radish, a good katsu sauce,the chawan mushi and a salad. The katso is served on a rack so they do not lay on the plate ad let the breading get soffy. I have not had the beef or the spicy pork which comes with an extremely spicy you are on your own warning. Kay has had the flounder Katsu which is a bit bland. Shrimp Katsu is very heavily breaded shrimp, I am not a fan. All the Katsu come with a small udon noodle in broth which is outstanding. They also have rolled katsu where the meats are wrapped around mozzarella cheese which I have not had. They also offer ramen which is better than average. On the combos you can get cold noodles which are very good as well. Very nice people, good service. Fun place for a good meal for not a lot of money.
  11. Tri tip 3 ways: Koji Rice & 2 x Shio Koji. Some really amazing results and I look forward to more koji & beef fun. Quick pickles made w/shio koji, persimmon vinegar, sheerry wine vinegar, sesame oil, tamari. We used red radish, red and white daikon, and turnip greens. Lots of left overs so I will see how these age for a day or two. This more than doubles the amount of food you get from a bunch of radish, turnip or daikon etc. Griddled potato slices w/divina oven roasted tomato, garlic, lebne, olive oil, sherry wine vinegar puree for dipping. The left over dip will go for crudite tomorrow. Kikusui Junmai Ginjo sake. The last of the Conn Creek 76 zin. A slice of the Pecorino Marchigiano
  12. The Koji trials are not going well because I needed to add water an I over watered both jars, first one, then the other to make them even. So far they are at the purely salty stage so I don't know if its just rice falling apart in water or a true fermentation. The proportions now are 10 water to 4 rice to the 1 or 2 parts salt. I will need to start over as I need to have some shio koji shortly as my current batch is almost dine. The Tri Tip trials were a huge success. All the meats wer marinated for 48 hours and easily could ahe gone more. Shiokoji from rice powder: this had the most developed koji flavor and a great texture. I'm pretty sure that this is because the powder lets the koji work quicker. Shiokoji from whole grain rice was superb but a little tougher than the first. This one had more kiji funk but less of the transformative texture thing going on. 24 more hours would probably have been spectacular. The Koji rice rubbed were incredible. They were beefy to an extreme. This method is usually referred to as a 2 day dry age but I don't think that is fair. It isn't as funky as dry age but it intensifies the beefy flavor. Super. Again, I would not hesitate to go 3 days or even up to 5.
  13. We have beengoing for years. I knew Tim was reviewing it when the plate of kimchi and daikon kimchi showed up in his Twitter feed But he missed a lot of great dishes. The pork intestine soup {dwaeji gukbab} has blood sausage, pork innards and pork meat and is my go to dish. The hangover soup is hearty. Kimchi Jigaee is another winner. Dakdori Tang is a chicken soup/stew with a sweet red sauce that does not seem too spicy at first but leaves a burn. Gamja Tang is pork bone soup and it has pork spine and you need to get down and dirty to get all the meats. Jeong Sik is the best $7 a meat eater can spend: huge plate of cooked pork and soon dae. And even though it is not really a BBQ place, their Galbi is superb if spendy.
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