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Paneer Sources and Uses


hillvalley
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Posting for a friend here. They just discovered paneer and is in love but doesn't know where to buy it and how to use it.

They need suggestions of where to buy it between Georgia Ave and Columbia, Md.

Does anyone have any good, basic recipes to start using it? I showed them Monica's paneer, fig pizza recipe in Modern Spice but that didn't interest them. I don't know anything about it so I didn't know where to start.

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Posting for a friend here. They just discovered paneer and is in love but doesn't know where to buy it and how to use it.

They need suggestions of where to buy it between Georgia Ave and Columbia, Md.

Does anyone have any good, basic recipes to start using it? I showed them Monica's paneer, fig pizza recipe in Modern Spice but that didn't interest them. I don't know anything about it so I didn't know where to start.

They sell paneer at Whole Foods. And at Indian grocery stores, of course. I'm not willing to do the research on finding one for your friend, but you might suggest that she look on www.eatwashington.com, since Julia Watson has created a fairly exhaustive compilation of ethnic grocery stores in the area.

As far as simple recipes--why not start with a good quality jarred curry sauce, like Patak's korma or one of the Rasika sauces, also available at Whole Foods. Your friend can chop some veg and cook them in the sauce with paneer and eat it with basmati rice. The most common Indian dish pairs paneer with spinach or sorrel (saag paneer). The spice blend for that may nor be as simple as your friend requires, however.

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Posting for a friend here. They just discovered paneer and is in love but doesn't know where to buy it and how to use it.

They need suggestions of where to buy it between Georgia Ave and Columbia, Md.

Does anyone have any good, basic recipes to start using it? I showed them Monica's paneer, fig pizza recipe in Modern Spice but that didn't interest them. I don't know anything about it so I didn't know where to start.

Any WF will have it in the cheese section. Even some Giants have it. The cheapest place to get it would be an Indo-Pak grocery store but cost may outweigh convenience. Better still, make your own. All you need is milk and lemon juice (or vinegar). Step by step recipes abound online. My parents make it regularly. The only special equipment you need is cheesecloth.

Lisa is a big fan of my dad's chayote squash and paneer dish. The only exotic ingredient you need is methi (fenugreek seeds). Here's his recipe.

Seasoning

1 teaspoon of fenugreek (methi)

Spices

4 table spoon of finely grated ginger or ginger paste

4 tablespoon of yogurt

1 teaspoon of turmeric

½ teaspoon of sugar

Salt to taste

Ingredients

8 ounce paneer (fresh or frozen but thawed)

1-2 Chayote Squash, peeled and cubed.

1 tablespoon oil

Method

Break the paneer with your fingers into coarse lumps. In a no-stick pan heat the oil and season with the fenugreek and add the chayote squash pieces and fry them with stirring till they are half cooked (soft). Now add the paneer, ginger, yogurt, turmeric, sugar and salt. Fry the mixture for a minute and don’t let yogurt lose all its water. Add water and cook in low heat until the squash is soft. The fine particles of paneer will make the gravy thick. Transfer into a serving bowl. Serve with basmati rice. WIll serve four people as one of many dishes in a dinner.

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Paneer is very easy to make.

Bring a gallon of whole milk to a rolling boil.

Add some vinegar or lemon juice to curdle the milk.

Boil few more minutes until the solids separate.

Do not overcook, as that will denature the protein and toughen the cheese.

Add some cold water to stop further cooking.

Strain in a muslin cloth and tie in tight ball.

Leave to hang over sink for few hours or place on drainboard weighed with a pot of water.

That is all there is to it !

With practice you will figure out how much vinegar to use and also how long you want to hang/press it.

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a lot of indians also use ricotta, drained a bit in cheesecloth, then pressed into a pan and baked. as for simpler recipes, recipies for palak paneer, muttar paneer and paneer makhani abound online, and they relatively uncomplicated for indian food. and if she goes to an indian grocery sometime, she may want to check if they have the deep brand paneer paratha in the frozen section. i love them, and i don't even like paneer much!

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