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Galaxy Quest (1999), Comedy Science-Fiction Parody of Star Trek - Directed by Dean Parisot, Produced by Mark Johnson and Charles Newirth


porcupine
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Alan Rickman's death had me reminiscing about Galaxy Quest, a silly movie but still a favorite. For one thing, although there are plenty of one-liners, much of the humor is visual, or in the editing. It's a movie that needs to be watchedAs in, when you're watching it, really pay attention to the visuals, like the way scenes are cut, or the expressions on peoples' faces, or their gestures.  Especially Alan Rickman's face.

And, although it satirizes Star Trek and those shows' die-hard fans, it does so in a gentle, good natured way. There's nothing crass or ugly about it.

The plot, briefly: many years after the TV Show Galaxy Quest is off the air, the washed-up actors are making a living by appearing at conventions and public openings. Until some aliens show up. These aliens have seen the TV broadcasts but mistook them for "historical documents". They get the actors on board a real-live working replica of the show's spaceship and...  wackiness ensues.

The cast:

Tim Allen as Jason Nesmith/Commander Peter Quincy Taggart [Kirk/Picard/Janeway/Sisko]

Alan Rickman as Alexander Dane/Dr. Lazarus [Mr. Spock/Jadzia Dax/Tuvok/T'Pol]

Sigourney Weaver as Gwen DeMarco/Lt. Tawny Madison [Uhura]

Tony Shalhoub as Fred Kwan/Tech Sargent Chen [Scotty/LaForge/O'Brien]

Sam Rockwell as Guy Fleegman/un-named [a redshirt]

Daryl Mitchell as Tommy Webber/Lt. Laredo [Wesley Crusher]

and many more.

If you're a SF fan and haven't seen Galaxy Quest, you need to. And if you're an Alan Rickman fan, be sure to watch his face and gestures. Dane is a great character, a classically-trained actor who can't get over being typecast as an alien, and Rickman does exceptional work portraying him.

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This is a brilliant movie!  It's a sci fi action adventure flick, inside a sci fi tv show, inside a movie.  The Star Trek show/Trekkies parallels are great but the best is the Capt Kirk/William Shatner asshole/egomaniac parallels to the Tim Allen character.  From listening to Howard Stern over the years, I've heard all sorts of stories about what a selfish, arrogant prick Shatner was to the other cast members (from those cast members) and the Tim Allen character mimics this perfectly.

And for some cosmic reason, sometime in the last week or so, I've had the Galaxy Quest catch phrase, "Never give up, never surrender" going through my head.

I may have to fire up the Netflix and watch this sucker again.

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Alan Rickman's death had me reminiscing about Galaxy Quest, a silly movie but still a favorite. For one thing, although there are plenty of one-liners, much of the humor is visual, or in the editing. It's a movie that needs to be watchedAs in, when you're watching it, really pay attention to the visuals, like the way scenes are cut, or the expressions on peoples' faces, or their gestures.  Especially Alan Rickman's face.

I watched this last week, and really enjoyed it - especially the first part at the convention, and the sub-plot about the spoofing of Shatner. Rickman and his expressions were great the whole movie, and any serious fan of Star Trek needs to watch this - I can't believe I didn't even know it existed (and wouldn't have, if you hadn't posted about it), so, I owe you a debt of gratitude, porcupine.

*** SPOILER ALERT ***

Is it only me, or did others think that the entire film might have been a dream (although it's pretty clear it turned out not to be), because Tim Allen had the opportunity to fall asleep in two places: once when he got plastered at his house, and again, when he told the "aliens" he was going to take a nap in the back seat of their car. I kept thinking he'd wake up at the end, but he didn't - which really makes it a much more satisfying film. Kudos also to the aliens, who played their roles brilliantly - really, everyone in that movie did - without looking at what else he directed, Dean Parisot is either a great director, or he was one serious fan of Star Trek, because he nailed it. I think the film got incredibly silly at times, but it was supposed to be ridiculous, so I can't count that as a flaw; still, I can't help wishing they were more subtle in how outlandish they made it (that's more the writer's or the producer's decision than the director's).

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I think the film got incredibly silly at times, but it was supposed to be ridiculous, so I can't count that as a flaw; still, I can't help wishing they were more subtle in how outlandish they made it (that's more the writer's or the producer's decision than the director's).

This is why I like, but don't love the film.

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Watched it the night after news of Alan Rickman's death was announced, solely to hear him say, "By Grabthar's hammer, by the suns of Warvan, you shall be avenged!"

So good. Also realized that a very young Justin Long made his debut here. This movie and Charlie and the Chocolate Factory are my two favorite movies that feature Missi Pyle.

For those who haven't watched yet, Alan Rickman is quite a good King in his last feature, A Little Chaos.

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We watched this based on porcupine's recommendation, and I thoroughly enjoyed it, particularly Alan Rickman's performance. The film was silly fun. I am not a big Star Trek fan, but I know enough about the series to appreciate the nods to it throughout this film.

It was fun also seeing a young Jason Long, Missi Pyle and Rainn Wilson in the early days of their careers.

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