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Did anyone else read this?

Did anyone else feel like they had been missing something in life, and now we have a life goal? Anyone want to actively work towards becoming a member with me? Here is the form!

Kate

I'm actively working on it now- it's forcing me to taste a lot of things I wouldn't otherwise taste. You're welcome to join along wth me in doing this :blink:
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It's actually not that hard to achieve, particularly with Jaleo and Zaytinya within a few blocks of one another.
Indeed. I'm trying to do a lot of this without doing a ton of blends, but for some of these it's impossible to find them outside of a blend. I love that this is something forcing me out of my comfort zone. Now for that concord grape, remind me what year that Manachewitz was?
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I would imagine that, with a few Ports, some Bordeaux, and a quick tour of Italian offerings, you could knock off 100 different grape varietals in no time flat in this town.

The question for me is, are you tasting them for the sake of tasting them, or are you in pursuit of tasting the best that each varietal has to offer?

I think that the latter would be the better and more rewarding challenge.

For example, if you wanted to try an outstanding example of Cabernet Franc, sure you could buy a Bordeaux that heavily favors that grape (i.e. Cheval Blanc, as has been discussed here) or you could try an excellent Anjou rouge, or one from Barboursville or Horton in Virgina, they both grow that grape very well. Don't want to spring for Vouvray or Montlouis, or Savennières? Then try a reasonably-priced South African "Steen" (now sensibly being labeled Chenin for export to the U.S.A. at any rate)

Sure, some grape varietals are virtually impossible to find unblended (unless you are in a winery that has those grapes in post-crush form and have the opportunity to try them in that state) but I suppose that is part of the challenge.

If anyone wants help in pursuing this challenge, I'd be happy to sell you examples of such interesting offerings as Gros Manseng, Colombard, Fie Gris and Madiran, as well as scores of others. Let me know if I can help.

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I would imagine that, with a few Ports, some Bordeaux, and a quick tour of Italian offerings, you could knock off 100 different grape varietals in no time flat in this town.

Ah, yes. But if you read the Post article closely, Henry Richardson who was pictured in the article (full disclosure--his wife is a friend of mine) is working on his SECOND hundred. That's a considerably more difficult challenge.

This reminds me a lot of bird listing, a pastime whose pursuit in high numbers also can involve considerable expense.

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Alan refers to the Clos de Tue-Boeuf AOC Touraine "Brin de Chevre." There is also Touraine "L'Ormeau de Deux Croix" which is chenin and Touraine "Buisson Pouilleux" which is a weird old massale of sauvignon blanc.

Tessier "Cour Cheverny" (v: ramoritin) is a smokin example of the grape, which is very similar in style to chenin from Savennieres.. or something like Puffeney Traminer from Jura, or his Savagnin 'dry' bottling which is very aldahidic, with rhone texture.. wild!!!... it is one thing to have obscure grapes, but the producer has to be of quality, otherwise it is just another MICROOXYGENATED", Carbonicllymacerated crap bottling that tastes like :angry: 5 dollar wine( meaning: when you are at this stage of the spectrum, there is not enough time and enrgy, and resources put into the wine to make it any kind of exsample worth representing... for the most part,,,)

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Very true, though I prefer Cazin to Tessier (and Puzelat does a Romorantin VdT). And Tessier's wooded bottling is a real disappointment.

So where does the "Dubious Additives" fall into play with the Centurian Club? Since it is legal to use MEGA PURPLE or MeGA RED in california as an additive to aid in color, wieght, sugar (!?!?!) since they are by-products of grapes i nthe beginning. This one to be inquisitively furiated with the state of the Domestic industry :angry:

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I have another wonderfully obscure white varietal to add to the mix: Malvoisie.

Really, it's Pinot Gris, but it might just be a unique enough clone of Pinot Gris to qualify as a different varietal on this list, but I don't know.

it cold be though, it also finds it self under other names also, so...Also used as a synonym for Vermentino, Clairette and Bouroulenc

look for the odd varietal like Vernatsch aka Schiava aka Trollinger... this is a fun grape for rustic attributes :angry:

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An efficient/really fun way to make some progress on this list is a quick tour through the Virginia wine country. Any number of local wineries will sample out their generally well made Viogniers and Cabernet Francs, and most will help you knock out some of those pesky domestic/hybrid varietals like Norton, Niagara, Catawba, Seyval Blanc, etc. Heck, with one trip to Charlottesville you could visit Horton and check off a good 20+ varietals, Barboursville (my favorite local winery) for another 10, and still have time to visit Monticello and make it back to the metro area before dinnertime. Great wine, great countryside and a few marks towards your goal-- overall a nice day-trip.

Incidentally, we just picked up an awesome varietal Saperavi, a native Georgian oddball on the Century list. Come by and pick up a bottle of Teliani Valley Mukuzani Kakheti 2004-- I can't really speak to traditional correctness, but it is a great wine in its own right-- drinks like a rather full AOC Bordeaux with a slight burnt-meat gaminess on the nose, and will only set you back $13.

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An efficient/really fun way to make some progress on this list is a quick tour through the Virginia wine country. Any number of local wineries will sample out their generally well made Viogniers and Cabernet Francs, and most will help you knock out some of those pesky domestic/hybrid varietals like Norton, Niagara, Catawba, Seyval Blanc, etc. Heck, with one trip to Charlottesville you could visit Horton and check off a good 20+ varietals, Barboursville (my favorite local winery) for another 10, and still have time to visit Monticello and make it back to the metro area before dinnertime. Great wine, great countryside and a few marks towards your goal-- overall a nice day-trip.

Incidentally, we just picked up an awesome varietal Saperavi, a native Georgian oddball on the Century list. Come by and pick up a bottle of Teliani Valley Mukuzani Kakheti 2004-- I can't really speak to traditional correctness, but it is a great wine in its own right-- drinks like a rather full AOC Bordeaux with a slight burnt-meat gaminess on the nose, and will only set you back $13.

kakheti: varietal is Postup right? i am not sure if hybrid varietals should be included on the Century list, just because a lot of them are infererior.. except for say, seyval blanc, crouchen blanc, nouvelle, and alicante bouschet.. my thought, but for sure like to be provedwrong with an example.. love barboursville though too. their nebbiolo is rockin! as are their viognier.. i use to have a vertical of the octagon back to the first release topresent at The inn @ LW.

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Saperavi is the varietal-- not hybrid, I am pretty sure, and I do not know what exactly "Kakheti" means, but I think it is a proprietary wine name that means something to someone in their native land. Either way, kick-ass wine.

Glad to hear you also love Barboursville-- I've met the winemaker Luca several times; really cool guy. If you like Virginia Viognier, by the way, check out Pearmund-- they are located right outside Warrenton, have one of the best Viogniers I've tasted, are locally distributed, AND have the honor of being the only stateside winery I know of that makes a straight up madeira style wine, cooked on the roof and all. Its called "Vin de Sol," and I think it is only available at the winery.

kakheti: varietal is Postup right? i am not sure if hybrid varietals should be included on the Century list, just because a lot of them are infererior.. except for say, seyval blanc, crouchen blanc, nouvelle, and alicante bouschet.. my thought, but for sure like to be provedwrong with an example.. love barboursville though too. their nebbiolo is rockin! as are their viognier.. i use to have a vertical of the octagon back to the first release topresent at The inn @ LW.
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Saperavi is the varietal-- not hybrid, I am pretty sure, and I do not know what exactly "Kakheti" means, but I think it is a proprietary wine name that means something to someone in their native land. Either way, kick-ass wine.

Glad to hear you also love Barboursville-- I've met the winemaker Luca several times; really cool guy. If you like Virginia Viognier, by the way, check out Pearmund-- they are located right outside Warrenton, have one of the best Viogniers I've tasted, are locally distributed, AND have the honor of being the only stateside winery I know of that makes a straight up madeira style wine, cooked on the roof and all. Its called "Vin de Sol," and I think it is only available at the winery.

i have been to pearmund too, as well as all the other "good" wineries of virginia.

as for saperavi, i have not had the chance to taste one, and yes, i know it is a "varietal" and not a hybrid,, was referencing that i dont hink hybrids should be part of the century club. just a thought.. ever have a saperavi from any of the confederate of independent states ?

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Saperavi is the varietal-- not hybrid, I am pretty sure, and I do not know what exactly "Kakheti" means, but I think it is a proprietary wine name that means something to someone in their native land. Either way, kick-ass wine.

Glad to hear you also love Barboursville-- I've met the winemaker Luca several times; really cool guy. If you like Virginia Viognier, by the way, check out Pearmund-- they are located right outside Warrenton, have one of the best Viogniers I've tasted, are locally distributed, AND have the honor of being the only stateside winery I know of that makes a straight up madeira style wine, cooked on the roof and all. Its called "Vin de Sol," and I think it is only available at the winery.

i have been to pearmund too, as well as all the other "good" wineries of virginia.

as for saperavi, i have not had the chance to taste one, and yes, i know it is a "varietal" and not a hybrid,, was referencing that i dont hink hybrids should be part of the century club. just a thought.. ever have a saperavi from any of the confederate of independent states ?

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I have another new one, very rare indeed: Ruché ("ROO-kay") from Castagnole Monferrato.

Here's some knowledge, and more knowledge courtesy of Robin Garr

The varietal Ruché from Cantine Sant'Agata...is one of the most unusual red wines, one that I've described as "fruitcake in a glass." This new offering from La Mondianese, perhaps moderated by a few months in oak barriques, is a bit less wacky in style, but it's very appealing. A whiff of high-toned oak on first impression quickly gives way to delicious floral scents - violets for sure, maybe roses - and a crisp, dry impression of cranberries, ripe and tart.
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I have another new one, very rare indeed: Ruché ("ROO-kay") from Castagnole Monferrato.

Here's some knowledge, and more knowledge courtesy of Robin Garr

Ruche is a great grape, and very grapey indeed. only problem is that Cantina Sant'Agita is a Co-Op, and that means they produce an overabundance of SWILL. the grape was replanted and cropped with Barbera instead. Try this producer instead:

Crivelli, or Tivjin.. both are from castagnole Monferato,, 2005s are smokin, not super complex but real pleasent drinkers :angry:

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I have another new one, very rare indeed: Ruché ("ROO-kay") from Castagnole Monferrato.

Here's some knowledge, and more knowledge courtesy of Robin Garr

Ruche is a great grape, and very grapey indeed. only problem is that Cantina Sant'Agita is a Co-Op, and that means they produce an overabundance of SWILL. the grape was replanted and cropped with Barbera instead. Try this producer instead:

Crivelli, or Tivjin.. both are from castagnole Monferato,, 2005s are smokin, not super complex but real pleasent drinkers :angry:

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Ruche is a great grape, and very grapey indeed. only problem is that Cantina Sant'Agita is a Co-Op, and that means they produce an overabundance of SWILL. the grape was replanted and cropped with Barbera instead. Try this producer instead:

Crivelli, or Tivjin.. both are from castagnole Monferato,, 2005s are smokin, not super complex but real pleasent drinkers :angry:

The version that I had was from La Mondianese, not from Cantina Sant'Agita. A really nice red to match with fowl or pork, not so much red meat. Might be a great Thanksgiving red because of the spice you get from it, if you don't require an American wine to accompany your T-Day bird.

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Ruche is a great grape, and very grapey indeed. only problem is that Cantina Sant'Agita is a Co-Op, and that means they produce an overabundance of SWILL. the grape was replanted and cropped with Barbera instead. Try this producer instead:

Crivelli, or Tivjin.. both are from castagnole Monferato,, 2005s are smokin, not super complex but real pleasent drinkers :blink:

Haven't had the Sant'Agita, but I can vouch for the Crivelli-- outstanding year after year. The most recent vintage is redolent of blood orange and earth, not unlike a young Californian Pinot Noir, but with the octane upped by ten degrees. Incidentally, it is great with pork loin, or bacon, or chorizo... anything remotely pig related, really.

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