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Roasted Bone Marrow


Gastro888
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I'm looking for a restaurant in the area that does a great roasted bone marrow. I'm having wicked cravings for it and was wondering if anyone knew of a restaurant that does this dish well. Or am I better off doing this at home? If so, any hints and suggestions on how to prepare this dish would be much appreciated!

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I had the pleasure of eating at St. John's http://www.stjohnrestaurant.co.uk/ in London last fall and tried their "Roast Bone Marrow and Parsley Salad". I even met Fergus Henderson himself! I would suggest trying his recipe from his book.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/006058536...glance&n=283155

PM me later and I will try to locate my copy and send you the recipe.

I too am intrested in getting responses to local venues or whom migh sell good bones.

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I too am intrested in getting responses to local venues or whom migh sell good bones.

Call The Organic Butcher of McLean (703-790-8300) and talk to Don. I'll bet he'll sell you some marrow bones. They get the whole carcass from local organic farmers and break it down themselves. This is high quality product and won't be cheap. Then again, if you are eating marrow you don't want to be looking for bargains, do you.

(I believe I have seen marrow bones at Union Meats in Eastern Market. They will be less expensive than OB of McL.)

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I've never had difficulty getting marrow bones or oxtail bones at the Giant at Montrose Crossing (admittedly, one of the larger Giant locations in the area).

If you don't see them in the display case, just ask - this has never failed for me.

And, as JPW mentioned, Whole Foods has them pretty regularly as well, though at twice the price of Giant. :lol: Maybe the local Asian or Latin markets?

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Roast Bone Marrow and Parsley Salad

From Fergus Henderson's Nose to Tail Eating, A Kind of British Cooking

12 - 7-8cm pieces of middle veal marrowbone

a healthy bunch of flat parsley, picked from the stems

2 shallots, peeled and very thinly sliced

1 modest handful of capers (extra fine if possible)

Dressing

juice of one lemon

extra virgin olive oil

a pinch of sea salt and pepper

a good supply of toast

coarse sea salt

Put the bone marrow in a ovenproof frying pan and place in a hot oven. The roasting process should take 20 minutes depending on the thickness of the bone. You are looking at the marrow to be loose and giving, but not melted away, which it will do if left to long (traditionaly ends would be covered to prevent any seepage, but I like the colouring and crispness at the end).

Meanwhile, lightly chop the parsely, just enough to discipline it, mix it with the shattots and capers, and at the last moment dress.

Here is a dish that should not be completely seasoned before leaving the kitchen rendering a last minute seasonong unnecessary by the actual eater; this, especially in the case of coarse sea salt, gives the texture and uplift at the moment of eating. My approach is to scrape the marrow from the bone onto the toast and season with coarse sea salt. then a pinch of parsley salad on top of this, and eat. Of course once you have your pile of bones, salad, toast and salt it is "liberty hall".

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What impresses me about this version of marrow bones is its simplicity. I gave up meat for lent, but will be trying this is 40 days or so.

I thought marrow bones would be beef, who knew?

Scott

Roast Bone Marrow and Parsley Salad

From Fergus Henderson's Nose to Tail Eating, A Kind of British Cooking

12 - 7-8cm pieces of middle veal marrowbone

a healthy bunch of flat parsley, picked from the stems

2 shallots, peeled and very thinly sliced

1 modest handful of capers (extra fine if possible)

Dressing

juice of one lemon

extra virgin olive oil

a pinch of sea salt and pepper

a good supply of toast

coarse sea salt

Put the bone marrow in a ovenproof frying pan and place in a hot oven. The roasting process should take 20 minutes depending on the thickness of the bone. You are looking at the marrow to be loose and giving, but not melted away, which it will do if left to long (traditionaly ends would be covered to prevent any seepage, but I like the colouring and crispness at the end).

Meanwhile, lightly chop the parsely, just enough to discipline it, mix it with the shattots and capers, and at the last moment dress.

Here is a dish that should not be completely seasoned before leaving the kitchen rendering a last minute seasonong unnecessary by the actual eater; this, especially in the case of coarse sea salt, gives the texture and uplift at the moment of eating. My approach is to scrape the marrow from the bone onto the toast and season with coarse sea salt. then a pinch of parsley salad on top of this, and eat. Of course once you have your pile of bones, salad, toast and salt it is "liberty hall".

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DC Coast used to have an appetizer featuring veal marrow bones that was outstanding but it's been several years since I've had it. Whole Foods does indeed sell frozen marrow bones. I've used them regularly for several years making beef stock from them. Whole Foods IS inconsistent about which stores regularly carry them. At this point, buying them an average of once every two months, I only go to the Whole Foods in Vienna having found that it's hit or miss in other Northern VA stores finding them. And, no, they're not cheap at all. But cooking down for 13 or 14 hours they make an incredible, rich stock more than worth the cost and the effort. Speaking of cost, has anyone noticed how much tomatoes are these days?

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Whole Foods does indeed sell frozen marrow bones.  I've used them regularly for several years making beef stock from them.  Whole Foods IS inconsistent about which stores regularly carry them.  At this point, buying them an average of once every two months, I only go to the Whole Foods in Vienna having found that it's hit or miss in other Northern VA stores finding them.  And, no, they're not cheap at all.  But cooking down for 13 or 14 hours they make an incredible, rich stock more than worth the cost and the effort. 

The Grand Mart on Route 7 in Sterling has had frozen marrow bones at every visit. I don't remember the price, but I believe they were reasonable.

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I'm hoping someone can help me with this. I bought a large amount of bones from a vendor at the SS Farmer's Market. When I got them home, I realized that they're full shin bones - approx 12 to 18 inches in length each.

I don't have a bandsaw to cut them. Would it still be possible to make stock from bones that large? Or should I find a butcher kind enough to cut them for me (I'll offer to pay for the labour, since I didn't buy them there)?

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If they fit into your pot, you rshouldn't have any trouble. The marrow will all melt out over the course of simmering.

Thank you Waitman! I'm going to make a large batch of stock this weekend. I don't have a hacksaw so I won't be able to try Sthitch's advice. But thanks anyways :)

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Thank you Waitman! I'm going to make a large batch of stock this weekend. I don't have a hacksaw so I won't be able to try Sthitch's advice. But thanks anyways :)

Did you buy veal or beef bones? Veal bones will yield much more gelatin and make a better stock. Speaking of which, I need to make another batch with the bones in my freezer.

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Did you buy veal or beef bones? Veal bones will yield much more gelatin and make a better stock. Speaking of which, I need to make another batch with the bones in my freezer.

They're beef bones. I realize that I won't get the same consistency - I'm doing this primarily to make stock for vietnamese pho. I'll try to reduce some further down for a demi-glace but may have to get veal bones from the local asian market as a supplement.

I'm wondering if adding some of the bones/stock to my chili will up the flavour quotient. Y'all can let me know next week :)

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