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Tweaked

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Everything posted by Tweaked

  1. Roasted onions, red & yellow peppers with whipped feta (olive oil, lemon, mint, dill)
  2. The St. Michael's thread is a little old. Does anyone have any dining recommendations? Looking for veg and seafood options. Thanks!
  3. Thai Shrimp Curry, Chinatown Style. Recipe adapted from Bangkok: Recipes and Stories from the Heart of Thailand (original recipe calls for beef, I made it with shrimp, but otherwise mostly followed the recipe)
  4. My source in the Raleigh-Durham area provided me the following list of BBQ joints last year. The Pit (Raleigh & Durham locations) Clyde Cooper’s Barbeque (Raleigh) Smokey’s BBQ Shack (Morrisville) Picnic (Durham) Bullock’s (Durham) I've been to The Pit in Durham, which I thought was solid, but that was several years ago.
  5. I'm afraid I'm going to have to report the same from the L Street location. I went for Friday lunch, and while the hummus was thick and creamy, it was all rather bland. Much like noamb above, it was missing the punchiness, and needed salt/lemon/garlic. I went with the version with Shakshuka, and it was a pretty lame version of Shakshuka, it seemed more like a tomato sauce. Dr. Shakshuka would not be happy!
  6. If you had plans to detour to Wilbur's, you might consider continuing on down the road to Grady's. But they have limited hours, so you'll need to plot your trip carefully. Grady's is true, shack on the side of the road eastern Carolina BBQ. The Raleigh Durham area has decent BBQ. Might be an easier sell to the family. Finally, if you think you can swing it with the family, consider hitting Rodney Scott's BBQ in Charleston and then continue on to Savannah.
  7. I was lucky enough to attend Rirkrit's artist talk and opening last night. An interesting guy and an interesting show. Several of the gallery assistants were on site drawing on the walls. Images, mostly taken from newspaper coverage of political events, are projected on the wall which the assistants broadly copy and then work off photos to fill in the details. The images range from political protests in Thailand to images of rallies held on the National Mall (suffragette movement, Million Man March, the Women's March etc.). Over the course of the show the walls will be continually drawn upon and then drawn on top of, filling in all the spaces. Plus Thai curry! There are also two movies running in an adjoining room, which we didn't have a chance to see.
  8. Honestly, when I saw the news last night, I had one of those, huh, he was still alive moments. The East Wing of the National Gallery is a fabulous building, in my opinion (other than the poorly designed downstairs bathrooms, near the gift shop nook. Terrible)
  9. Martin Puryear: Liberty Wash Post: America picked artist Martin Puryear's work for the Venice Biennale - and he's everything America is not
  10. Wash Post: Rirkrit Tiravanija is giving out free curry Apparently the curry is being prepared by Beau Thai (alas no propane burners allowed inside the Hishhorn) Available Thursdays - Sundays 11:45am-1:30pm, through July 24, while supplies last.
  11. Art world and food world collide at Rirkit Tiravanija's exhibit at the Hirshhorn. Rirkrit Tiravanija: (who’s afraid of red, yellow, and green) On view May 17 through July 24, 2019 "Rirkrit Tiravanija: (who’s afraid of red, yellow, and green) will be the Hirshhorn’s first-ever exhibition of works by contemporary Thai artist Rirkrit Tiravanija. Organized by Mark Beasley, the museum’s Robert and Arlene Kogod Secretarial Scholar, Curator of Media and Performance Art, the exhibition will transform the Hirshhorn’s galleries into a communal dining space in which visitors will be served curry and invited to share a meal together. The installation includes a large-scale mural, drawn on the walls over the course of the exhibition, which references protests against Thai government policies. Additional historic images speak to protest and the present. The exhibition will also include a series of documentary shorts curated exclusively for the Hirshhorn by Thailand’s leading independent filmmaker and Palme d’Or prize-winner Apichatpong Weerasethakul in collaboration with the artist. On view May 17–July 24, Tiravanija’s presentation unites his signature communal food-based work with his ongoing series of drawings derived from protest imagery, creating a unique dialogue within a single installation. The culinary component of the exhibition will occur Thursday–Sunday, 11:45 am–1:30 pm or until supplies last, every week during the run of the exhibition. Tiravanija’s long and varied career defies classification. For nearly 30 years, his artistic production has focused on real-time experience and exchange, breaking down the barriers between object and spectator. The title of Tiravanija’s culinary installation, which will be presented at the Hirshhorn for the first time since it entered the museum’s collection in 2017, (who’s afraid of red, yellow, and green), refers to the colors worn by the various factions in recent Thai government protests. The title also refers to the 1982 vandalism of Barnett Newman’s similarly titled painting in Berlin, which was motivated by the attacker’s belief that Newman’s painting was a “perversion” of the German flag. To soften Newman’s provocative title, Tiravanija uses parentheses and lowercase letters, suggesting that viewers answer the question as framed: “Who is afraid of what these colors symbolize?” Tiravanija’s unorthodox work first came to public view in a 1989 New York group show that included “Untitled Empty Parenthesis,” which consisted of the remains of a green curry meal. He continued to challenge the possibilities of the gallery space, eventually co-opting it as a site for the preparation and consumption of communal meals for gallery-goers as in “Untitled (Free)” (1992), and even going so far as to invite people to live within the gallery in “Untitled” (1999), which was an exact replica of his East Village apartment. Tiravanija’s interest lies in a desire to subvert deeply ingrained ways of interacting with art. By seeking alternative experiences of time, Tiravanija opens the door for novel forms of collaboration and exchange by diminishing the preciousness of objects through a reconsideration of their life cycle and function."
  12. 2 Amy's was hopping last night. Dishes getting 86ed by 7:45pm. But it was good to back at the bar. I went with: Sicilian anchovies with bread and butter (of course) Smoked salmon and cucumber salad on toasted bread with goat cheese and meyer lemon. Excellent dish. Green and white asparagus with mustardy dressing, crouton, and pecorino gran cru. The asparagus were excellent, the dressing could have been a little more mustardy/kicky. Capicolo cotto tonnato, sous vide pork shoulder, sliced thin, like a cold cut, served on top of a tonnato sauce and accompanied by arugula, a medium boiled egg and anchovy. A touch of salt and a touch of acid, and this would have been truly excellent. It was just missing that final pop. Sicilian meatballs, almonds, cinnamon, a good sized portion of about 15 small meatballs, this could have easily feed 3 people as an appetizer course. The meatballs were a little dry and dense, but good flavor from the tomato sauce.
  13. Highlight package for Tottenham v Ajax Leg 2 Highlight package for Liverpool v. Barcelona Leg 2
  14. Odd years mean the Venice Biennale, one of the foremost art festivals in the world. If you are traveling to Venice this year, check out the 58th edition. In 2019, the United States will be represented by DC's own Martin Puryear Official website Art News Guide
  15. Roasted Eggplant, White Beans, Tomato Sauce, Tahini, Fresh Herbs, Za'atar,
  16. Is it a sign that I read through the list over the weekend and was excited about trying none of the restaurants? The only place on the list I've been to is Pappe, which, to be fair, I did enjoyed.
  17. If all you need is a one-time tourist visa, take a look at India's e-Visa program. You can apply online and our turn around time was less than 48 hours for the visa. In addition, when we entered India at the Delhi airport, the e-Visa holders had a separate line at Passport Control. It took us all of 10 minutes to get processed and on our way. Tourist stuff in Delhi Humayun's Tomb is definitely worth visiting. It's the first Mughal garden-style tomb and the precursor for the Taj Mahal, which obviously is the zenith of the style. Fairly nearby is Safdarjung's Tomb, which is the last monumental garden tomb of the Mughals. Safdarjung is also not on many of the tourist lists, so when we visited there were maybe a dozen people on the grounds. Between Humayun's Tomb, the Taj, and Safdarjung you can get the full scope of Mughal tomb architecture. (if you're into that sort of thing!) One place not mentioned so far is the Red Fort in Delhi. Now looking at your itinerary, I'm guessing you will visit several of the major desert forts in Rajasthan, which will be much more impressive than the Red Fort. My impression is the Red Fort is more of a major tourist draw for Indians, since that is were the modern day Indian flag was first raised at Independence. Frankly, I found the Red Fort rather run down. Lodi Gardens is also worth a visit if you haven't got your fill of tomb architecture. North India has a lot of tombs and forts! Humayun, Lodi and Safdarjung are all located in the same area of Delhi, so you can visit a bunch of stuff without traveling all over the city. Food Cafe Lota - Located at the National Crafts Museum is good. Fairly casual with outdoor covered seating. Since you have a late flight, and if you want to go fancy, consider dinner at Indian Accent. The tasting menu runs about $50. Don't bother with the wine pairing, it's expensive and the wines are not that great. It also near Humayun's Tomb, so lunch could also be an option.
  18. The Renaissance Man himself. 2019 marks the 500th anniversary of his death. The Washington Post's Phil Kennicott visits the Last Supper. Vicky Hallett visits his home town of Vinci or stay in DC and visit with Ginevra de' Benci at the National Gallery of Art. The only painting by Leonardo on public view in the Americas.
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