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Old Hickory Steakhouse, Gaylord Hotel at National Harbor


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Congratulations to our own Little Wing - the Maitre d'Fromage at the Old Hickory Steakhouse. The list of her offerings looks interesting. You can check things out in person at a wine and cheese tasting next Saturday that is part of the Food & Wine Festival.

Best of luck to her in this new endeavor!

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Congratulations to our own Little Wing - the Maitre d'Fromage at the Old Hickory Steakhouse. The list of her offerings looks interesting. You can check things out in person at a wine and cheese tasting next Saturday that is part of the Food & Wine Festival.

Best of luck to her in this new endeavor!

Thanks goldenticket! That list is the core of what I'm carrying, but I always have some that aren't on the list, too!

Since I've spent most of my restaurant life at places like Palena and Komi, and my cheese life at Cowgirl and Cheesetique, it's definitely different being at a huge place like Gaylord/Old Hickory. But I was convinced to hop aboard when they told me about the cheese cave they built. And it's a pretty amazing thing to spend every day picking out whatever cool cheeses I want and aging them in the cave, then spend every night with a fully-stocked cart, talking to our guests about cheese and introducing them to all sorts of new deliciousness.

I would love love love to see any fellow rockwellians come in for cheese - just let me know!

And thanks again for the support ;)

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I wanted to let y'all know that we are hosting a Stag's Leap Wine Dinner next week at Old Hickory (with a cheese course, bien sur!). I usually don't like to use the site for this type of promotion, but I thought many of you might be interested. Please email me if you decide to come, so I can be on the lookout for you!

Here is the info, (which can also be found at the website):

Presenting Jeff McBride of Stag's Leap Wine Cellars

Wednesday, March 18 — 7:00 p.m.

Gaylord National is proud to introduce the 2009 Old Hickory Wine Series, an eclectic combination of intimate dinners showcasing the nation's most exciting vineyards. Discover a new world of vintage, modern and unique wines with this series of exclusive tastings and delectable pairings.

Join us for the first event of the series on Wednesday, March 18, when Executive Chef Wolfgang Birk welcomes Jeff McBride of Stag's Leap Wine Cellars to Old Hickory Steakhouse for an exclusive culinary and educational event.

The extraordinary tastes of an official Napa Valley First Growth Vineyard—including Cask 23, one of the country's preeminent red wines—have been expertly paired with a delectable, six-course dinner presentation. This full menu, which can be seen here, is only $125 per person, inclusive of tax and gratuity. Availability is limited for this exclusive event. For reservations, call (301) 965-2718. Reservations are required.

There is also a special deal if you are attending the dinner - you can stay at the hotel that night for a reduced rate. Then you don't have to worry about driving :rolleyes:

Here's the menu:

Stag’s Leap Wine Cellars Wine Dinner

March 18, 2009 at 7:00 p.m.

Hosted by:

Jeff McBride

Stag’s Leap Wine Cellars Vice President and General Manager

Passed Canapés

Stag’s Leap Wine Cellars Sauvignon Blanc, Napa, 2007

First Course

Watercress Soup

Fresh Quail Egg

Stag’s Leap Wine Cellars Sauvignon Blanc, Napa, 2007

Second Course

Pan Seared Diver Scallop in the Shell

Artichoke Mousseline, Yuzu Vinaigrette

Stag’s Leap Wine Cellars Karia Chardonnay, Napa, 2006

Third Course

Grape Musk Marinated Muscovy Duck Breast

Carrot Puree, Black Currant Sauce

Stag’s Leap Wine Cellars Merlot, Napa, 2005

Fourth Course

Roasted Veal Loin

Eggplant Emulsion and White Alba Truffle

Stag’s Leap Wine Cellars Artemis Cabernet Sauvignon, Napa, 2005

Fifth Course

Slow Braised Boneless Kobe Beef Short Rib

Root Vegetable Gratin, Cabernet Reduction

Stag’s Leap Wine Cellars Fay Vineyard Cabernet Sauvignon, Napa, 2005

Stag’s Leap Wine Cellars Vineyard Cask 23 Cabernet Sauvignon, 2004

Cheese Course

Lord of the Hundreds, Comte, Reypenaer

Traditional Accoutrements

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I love Stag's Leap Petit Syrah, bet this will be good.

The wine featured in the dinner is Stag's Leap, with a picture of one stag just standing there on the label. The Petite syrah producer, sho still makes great wines under their Berringer ownership, is Stags' Leap, many stags leaping.

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The wine featured in the dinner is Stag's Leap, with a picture of one stag just standing there on the label. The Petite syrah producer, sho still makes great wines under their Berringer ownership, is Stags' Leap, many stags leaping.

OK, that explains that, thanks for the info Dean! I had visited the other one in CA years ago, and it was a standout in my mind all this time. I had no idea that there were two similarly named marques.

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I thought Stags Leap was when you pass out after a bachelor party.

Actually the name has several histories. Unrequited love pays a part in some of them. Trgic tales involving Native Americans etc. However, there is archaeological evidence that there may have been a business called Stag's Leap that specialized in selling limited duration romantic interludes.

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I'm not sure Dean quite underscored the difference between the two producers.

Their names are so completely different that there should be no confusion henceforth. :rolleyes:

Stag's Leap Winery is the producer of the excellent Petite Syrah.

Stag's Leap Wine Cellars is the sponsor of the dinner. It is also the Great American Red Wine by virtue of the Cask 23 having kicked serious French ass in the famed "Judgement of Paris" wine tasting back before everyone here besides me, Rocks and Dean were born. And, once when a delightfully schnockered older couple told me to re-cork a bottle and take the two-thirds left home (the 375 of Puligny hit them hard -- that's the way I want to grow old) it was half -- with the brioche I swiped from the restaurant's kitchen -- of the most spectacular late-night dinner I ever ate.

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Stag's Leap Winery is the producer of the excellent Petite Syrah.
It was a bottle of 1973 Stag's Leap Petite Sirah accompanying a prix fixe dinner at a restaurant in an old French Laundry in the Napa Valley town of Yountville in 1976* that was the "kick between the eyes" for us, when we suddenly experienced wine in a completely new way--we who had previously enjoyed Gallo Hearty Burgundy and Mateus Rosé with our meals.

*long before Thomas Keller took over. It was simple rustic food--split pea soup, followed by roast pork and sauteed cherry tomatoes, as I recall. But it was the wine that they recommended to us that changed our lives. As soon as we returned to Los Angeles, I bought a case of the same wine. At the time, it was about $4 a bottle. I bought a second and third case, after we finished the first. And we bought a case of the 1974, which wasn't quite as magnificent as the 1973.

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I'm not sure Dean quite underscored the difference between the two producers.

Their names are so completely different that there should be no confusion henceforth. :rolleyes:

Stag's Leap Winery is the producer of the excellent Petite Syrah.

Stag's Leap Wine Cellars is the sponsor of the dinner. It is also the Great American Red Wine by virtue of the Cask 23 having kicked serious French ass in the famed "Judgement of Paris" wine tasting back before everyone here besides me, Rocks and Dean were born. And, once when a delightfully schnockered older couple told me to re-cork a bottle and take the two-thirds left home (the 375 of Puligny hit them hard -- that's the way I want to grow old) it was half -- with the brioche I swiped from the restaurant's kitchen -- of the most spectacular late-night dinner I ever ate.

How can the two entities seriously allow each other to continue using the name? I mean, come on, the earlier user has rights, and the latecomer should adopt a new mark pronto. This is worse than the cigar fiasco, with rights in certain traditional Cuban brands being granted to and used by non-Cuban producers. At least in that situation, you know that if you are purchasing from a law-abiding US business, you are getting the non-Cuban stuff. Who is going to remember one stag vs. more than one stag on the label, or where the apostrophe is placed in the name, when looking to purchase wines?

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How can the two entities seriously allow each other to continue using the name? I mean, come on, the earlier user has rights, and the latecomer should adopt a new mark pronto. This is worse than the cigar fiasco, with rights in certain traditional Cuban brands being granted to and used by non-Cuban producers. At least in that situation, you know that if you are purchasing from a law-abiding US business, you are getting the non-Cuban stuff. Who is going to remember one stag vs. more than one stag on the label, or where the apostrophe is placed in the name, when looking to purchase wines?

Stag's Leap, or Stags' Leap is also a geographic reference to a volcanic dike in the Stag's Leap AVA. As such, there are specific regulation regarding its use as a winery name. Wine Cellars started production in 1973 but registered it name earlier IIRC. Stags' Leap started production in 1972. There was litigation over the use which found that the two wineries were not named in an effort to confuse consumers and so both had the right to use it. Since both wineries are fabulously successful and long lived, there seems to be enough to differentiate them in the consumer's mind.

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