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Salt Roasting


cjsadler
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My dad used to try this method all the time, wrapping the chicken in cheesecloth. It's a popular Cantonese technique. I remember it being pretty tasty, but apparently not up to the standard he'd had at a restaurant in SF. There are some less complicated variations, but the best is dipping it into the traditional sauce - hot oil poured over a prodigious amount of salt, ginger, scallions and garlic. Yum.

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Using enough kosher salt to encase a large piece of meat or a whole chicken can get a bit pricey.
I recently found cheap, large boxes (3lbs) of Crystal kosher salt at the Penzey's in Rockville. I think it was only $2.50 per box. It seems like enough to get 2-3 salt roasts out of.
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I recently found cheap, large boxes (3lbs) of Crystal kosher salt at the Penzey's in Rockville. I think it was only $2.50 per box. It seems like enough to get 2-3 salt roasts out of.
I roasted fish this way. I was able to get large quantities of salt for pretty cheap at the hardware store in a giant bag. It was right next to the snowshovels. I think the fish was bad though because I got pretty sick afterward. I am looking forward to trying this method again with a fresh batch of fish.
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I roasted fish this way. I was able to get large quantities of salt for pretty cheap at the hardware store in a giant bag. It was right next to the snowshovels. I think the fish was bad though because I got pretty sick afterward. I am looking forward to trying this method again with a fresh batch of fish.

ummm... are you sure the salt you bought was sodium chloride?

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A more ambitious, whimsical classic of salt-crusting involves making the salt/flour/egg-white dough and sculpting it around a whole seared bird so as to replicate the encased contents then ceremoniously breaking the savory sarcophagus table side with a well polished mallet.

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“Rooster in Pastry” was said to be Rabelais' favorite dish, hence the French zoological idiom associating “Coq en Pâte” to a tremendous state of happiness.

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