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White Wine and Cheese


Mark Slater
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I don't like dry red wines with cheese, especially in the normal fashion of a mixed cheese plate. Too many assertive flavors (and often, textures), and while the tannins might scrub some from the mouth, the pairing almost never allows the nuance of the wine to come out. The tradition of dry red wine with cheese stems, at least in part, only from the fact that cheese is taken after the last savory course, with which a dry red wine is normally served.

Sweet chenin for me, most of the time. Though there are some great classic dry-white and cheese pairings as well.

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On 12/11/2007 at 11:53 PM, Mark Slater said:

I normally use a really assertive red wine with cheese, or a Port. This article suggests differently. What do you think?

My wife kind of mixes it up when we do wine and cheese for dinner. I prefer a nice red, but she's picked some interesting whites from time to time to see what we think and we've been pleased with some of the results. Never say never.

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10 hours ago, Pool Boy said:

My wife kind of mixes it up when we do wine and cheese for dinner. I prefer a nice red, but she's picked some interesting whites from time to time to see what we think and we've been pleased with some of the results. Never say never.

Find a really ripe Afidelice and a very cold, Premier Cru Chablis. Afedelice is the cheese like Epoisses that is rubbed with Chablis, instead of Marc de Bourgogne.

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On ‎12‎/‎11‎/‎2007 at 11:53 PM, Mark Slater said:

I normally use a really assertive red wine with cheese, or a Port. This article suggests differently. What do you think?

From a personal perspective, I agree with you.  ON the other hand, I strongly believe that people should pair wine and food in the manner that they enjoy without ridicule from wine snobs. Once at a very  fancy DC restaurant, our waiter criticized my date's wine choice.  I immediately walked to the maitre  d' and requested a new waiter.

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The old adage is, "Pair red wine with cheese."

Robert Parker came along, and said, "Pair white wine with cheese."

Don Rockwell came along, and said, "Pair the correct drink - not necessarily wine - with a given cheese or cheese plate." In general, I've found your partially remaining glass of red wine, at the end of a meal, to work just fine with any well-rounded cheese plate that comes your way. Have some extra beer in your glass? Use that. White wine works, too. So does water, so does a cup of hot tea.

The one thing I'd stress is time-tested: Have your charcuterie before the meal; have your cheese after the meal - cheese is a wonderful digestive, and you'll shockingly find yourself *less full* after a cheese plate, than you were going into it.

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On 3/26/2018 at 8:45 PM, DonRocks said:

The one thing I'd stress is time-tested: Have your charcuterie before the meal; have your cheese after the meal - cheese is a wonderful digestive, and you'll shockingly find yourself *less full* after a cheese plate, than you were going into it.

Underberg works wonder for feeling astonishingly less full.

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I generally do not pour any additional or new wines for the cheese course unless I know it will be appreciated.  The Coravin makes it a whole lot easier to get a sip of desert wine or finish up with a something I know a guest will really enjoy.

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