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Rocky Point Creamery, Point of Rocks - Dairy Farmer Chuck Fry Owns His Own Dairy Cows


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Might be your big chance to go lean on a dairy farmer to make exactly what you want. Rocky Point Creamery (4323 Tuscarora Rd, Point of Rocks MD) is about a month away from opening, and owner Chuck Fry means to make pretty much everything ice cream-esque to sell either at the counter or through the drive-through window. A fourth-generation dairy farmer, Fry's milk comes from his herd of Holsteins on the adjacent farm, so freshness won't be an issue. He's got a soft-serve machine in, and also plans to make hard ice cream with up to 14% butterfat. His recipe is Philadelphia-style (aka not custard), and that's about all I had time to ask about today when I stuck my nose in the front door.

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Might be your big chance to go lean on a dairy farmer to make exactly what you want. Rocky Point Creamery (4323 Tuscarora Rd, Point of Rocks MD) is about a month away from opening, and owner Chuck Fry means to make pretty much everything ice cream-esque to sell either at the counter or through the drive-through window. A fourth-generation dairy farmer, Fry's milk comes from his herd of Holsteins on the adjacent farm, so freshness won't be an issue. He's got a soft-serve machine in, and also plans to make hard ice cream with up to 14% butterfat. His recipe is Philadelphia-style (aka not custard), and that's about all I had time to ask about today when I stuck my nose in the front door.

Please, please, PLEASE use cane sugar instead of high-fructose corn syrup!

Please?

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Might be your big chance to go lean on a dairy farmer to make exactly what you want. Rocky Point Creamery (4323 Tuscarora Rd, Point of Rocks MD) is about a month away from opening, and owner Chuck Fry means to make pretty much everything ice cream-esque to sell either at the counter or through the drive-through window. A fourth-generation dairy farmer, Fry's milk comes from his herd of Holsteins on the adjacent farm, so freshness won't be an issue. He's got a soft-serve machine in, and also plans to make hard ice cream with up to 14% butterfat. His recipe is Philadelphia-style (aka not custard), and that's about all I had time to ask about today when I stuck my nose in the front door.

Interesting - that explains the construction. Not exactly a vibrant retail scene but hey, the cows are there. Maybe it'll be like the old "dairy bars" of yore and Southern NJ.

Too bad about the place across the street that was once a breakfast/lunch restaurant, maybe 12 years ago, that now has trees growing through the walls. Not that I was sad to see the restaurant go, rather that there was a full facility right there had it not been let to rot.

There was a time when I looked into buying that big brick house directly across from the train station, the one with the wrap-around porch.

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Opened yesterday with an array of traditional flavors. I didn't notice any bean flecks in the vanilla when I stopped in this evening, but the chocolate is deeply chocolatey. The texture is fine and dense, as befits a super-premium. Say hi to Chuck, and give him your good ideas. He was particularly curious what it was about corn syrup that people are opposed to...although in the same sentence, he mentioned a direct, personal connection to cane sugar growers in Louisiana.

Right now, it's strictly a scoop shop. Pints and quarts for take-out are in the works, pending some assistance from the UM Extension Service.

ETA hours per their fb page: Tues-Sat noon-7pm, Sun 1pm-7pm

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Holy moly, the ice cream sandwiches are good. I tried the Oreo cookie and the chocolate chip varieties, both with vanilla ice cream. The ice cream was really fresh / milky tasting - not overly sweet or so creamy as to be gummy. Nice and crisp. And the cookies aren't mushy, although the sandwiches are pre-made. $8 for 6.

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Stopped in a few weeks ago. Big place, shiny, new. Lots of things offered. Too many things. Neither Mr P nor I particularly cared for any flavor we sampled, though the basic quality of the ice cream we tried was decent. I'd like to see them narrow their focus and do one thing really, really well, but that's just me.

BTW, their milk gets sent to the co-operative in Frederick; what they use in the ice cream is co-op milk, so only part of it is actually from their own farm, though all of it is local of course. Broom's Bloom up near Bel Air does the same thing.

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BTW, their milk gets sent to the co-operative in Frederick; what they use in the ice cream is co-op milk, so only part of it is actually from their own farm, though all of it is local of course. Broom's Bloom up near Bel Air does the same thing.

As I've learned from the world of wine (and grape growers), co-ops aren't the worst thing in the world, and are often better than tiny individual growers trying to make their own (economies of scale buying expensive equipment, an expert winemaker, etc.) You lose a bit of individuality with the terroir, but that's the trade-off.

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Stopped in a few weeks ago. Big place, shiny, new. Lots of things offered. Too many things. Neither Mr P nor I particularly cared for any flavor we sampled, though the basic quality of the ice cream we tried was decent.

This sums up about how I felt. It didn't help that I drank the Lucerne sweet tea with my ice cream. Blech for me, since I didn't want to drink syrup with my chocolate syrup topping. Little man liked his birthday cake scoop that came with confetti. It's a bit too far for me to give it a second go, but it is definitely popular with the locals this past Saturday.

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Once every few months we pack the family into the car for the drive to Rocky Point Creamery from Dunn Loring.  It's a pretty trip, and the promise of ice cream calms the kids just long enough.  We've been half a dozen times and it is consistently good.  Yesterday, I had the chocolate malt shake (made from soft serve only), which was good.  Not as good as Mrs. Law Taco's pumpkin ice cream.  It was more than just a nutmeg and cinnamon spice bomb and had real pumpkin flavor. I did not try the kids cotton candy ice cream, but their lips were suitably pink afterwards.

On the drive home we stopped by Vanish Brewery and grabbed a growler of Oktoberfest, which was very fresh.  I plan to hit up BVQ next weekend. I'm trying to make a point of posting more, so that will be my next goal.

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On 10/24/2016 at 9:51 AM, Law Taco said:

Once every few months we pack the family into the car for the drive to Rocky Point Creamery from Dunn Loring.  It's a pretty trip, and the promise of ice cream calms the kids just long enough.  We've been half a dozen times and it is consistently good.  Yesterday, I had the chocolate malt shake (made from soft serve only), which was good.  Not as good as Mrs. Law Taco's pumpkin ice cream.  It was more than just a nutmeg and cinnamon spice bomb and had real pumpkin flavor. I did not try the kids cotton candy ice cream, but their lips were suitably pink afterwards.

On the drive home we stopped by Vanish Brewery and grabbed a growler of Oktoberfest, which was very fresh.  I plan to hit up BVQ next weekend. I'm trying to make a point of posting more, so that will be my next goal.

I just cannot believe it has been five years.

Because of your post, and the basic tone of others preceding it, I'm raising Rocky Point Creamery to Italic - it was an oversight on my part, not having raised it before: After the two posts before yours, I was giving them some more time to prove they could learn to make ice cream, as well as having a good base product ... I didn't realize that *years* would slip by before getting around to it. <_<

(It probably goes without saying that it's also ranked #1 in Point of Rocks).

Rocky Point Creamery also has a website now - note that they're selling their own beef as a retail product. If their beef is good, then people should chime in and everyone know - it's dry-aged 21 days, sold frozen, and I'd like nothing more than a chance to support a family farm.

Important: Note the hours on the website, as it's clearly a seasonal business.

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This place is a great pit stop for those out on a weekend joy ride. I was with a couple friends, and not one of the MCs or riding groups, but everyone was very friendly. And there were some fantastic looking motorcycles to check out (my own not included).

Also, props to the young lady behind the counter that snarkily answered my sincere question about the difference between a malted milk shake and non malted milk shake, with the answer being malt.

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