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Asking the Chef for Recipes


DanCole42
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Do you consider it "appropriate" to ask a professional chef for a recipe?

Will the chef think "Wow! He must REALLY like this dish! I'm flattered," or "How dare he! This is MY recipe, and I will NOT let him steal it! I don't go around asking HIM his most intimate personal details! Harumph!"???

What's the best way to approach someone with this question?

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Do you consider it "appropriate" to ask a professional chef for a recipe?

Will the chef think "Wow! He must REALLY like this dish! I'm flattered," or "How dare he! This is MY recipe, and I will NOT let him steal it! I don't go around asking HIM his most intimate personal details! Harumph!"???

What's the best way to approach someone with this question?

imho, the most considerate way is to send an email. while it is very flattering for a table to ask to "see the chef", during service is not a great time to speak with a chef.

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Do you consider it "appropriate" to ask a professional chef for a recipe?

Will the chef think "Wow! He must REALLY like this dish! I'm flattered," or "How dare he! This is MY recipe, and I will NOT let him steal it! I don't go around asking HIM his most intimate personal details! Harumph!"???

What's the best way to approach someone with this question?

Most great food is the product of specialized technique or equipment, or some deeper knowledge transformed into passion. Recipes rarely help. A great chef is almost always humble about his craft and therefore willing to share.

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Most great food is the product of specialized technique or equipment, or some deeper knowledge transformed into passion.  Recipes rarely help.  A great chef is almost always humble about his craft and therefore willing to share.

I think you should teach a cooking class. But not just to anyone. It would be like in Fight Club, or at a Buddhist temple, where applicants have to wait outside for three days and nights in total silence while you berate them and throw rancid beef grissle.

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I always take such requests in the right spirit and am always willing to share any recipes. I think Mr. Landrum said it best.

Also the creation of a dish is in years of practise and mere words of a recipe do not translate into a great dish. Not only do I email the recipe but always suggest stores for the ingredients and sometimes even pack a little bit of the more difficult to find ingredients.

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Do you consider it "appropriate" to ask a professional chef for a recipe?

Will the chef think "Wow! He must REALLY like this dish! I'm flattered," or "How dare he! This is MY recipe, and I will NOT let him steal it! I don't go around asking HIM his most intimate personal details! Harumph!"???

What's the best way to approach someone with this question?

Probably better if you are a regular and have met the chef before to see what his personality is like. Depends on the chef. If the chef seems approachable just ask in a very friendly way or send an email. There's really no one way to ask. Personalities vary a lot.

my sig is way too long. I was encouraged to put my affiliations in my sig and now it looks too long :)

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Probably better if you are a regular and have met the chef before to see what his personality is like. Depends on the chef. If the chef seems approachable just ask in a very friendly way or send an email. There's really no one way to ask. Personalities vary a lot.

my sig is way too long. I was encouraged to put my affiliations in my sig and now it looks too long :)

Hey farid,

What are you doing here? Don't you have your own playground? :angry:

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I don't think there is a problem with asking chefs for recipes; with open kitchen, one is tempted. Of course, timing is important; asking the chef anything when he's yelling, "Pick up!!!" is not much better than chatting up a surgeon during appendectomy.

I personally never had a problem approaching, talking or asking chefs for stuff. They also don't seem to have a problem with giving it to me.

I do have a problem copying their instructions in my kitchen. But that's my problem.

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Colorado Kitchen's Chef Gillian Clark was very generous when I e-mailed her for her corn chowder recipie. I think it's probably flattering for most chefs. There's no harm in politely asking; they can always say "no." Checking with a server by saying, "What's the best way to ask chef for a recipie?" might help. That way, they can tell you up front if it's something the chef doesn't do or they can provide an e-mail address, etc.

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I, personnally, will email recipes for dishes to customers who want them if they leave their email address with their server. But, it is like Micheal says, sometimes it's a result of special techniques. The other problem that happens is that in a home kitchen it is often difficult, if not nearly impossible to replicate a particular recipe. I even have problems with replicating the same food I serve in the restaurant at home, either the stove doesn't get hot enough, there's not enough room to mise en place properly, little things that can affect the outcome. Also, when teaching classes, I realize that some of the stuff I do without realizing it, doesn't get into the recipe. It's difficult sometimes to translate the stuff that comes naturally into a step by step process. Also, most recipes from restaurants are probably not tested for home kitchens....

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