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Antrim 1844, Historic Hotel in Taneytown, MD - Chef Spencer Wolff Replaces Michael Gettier


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Ok, it's closer to Gettysburg than Dupont, but I was out there last weekend for a wedding. Wandered into the main building where rooms go for some $200/night to stay in the middle of nowhere. But they had a really nice looking pub, with this smell of fireplace smoke that contributed as much to the atmosphere as the dark wood and the hazy sunshine coming into the windows.

I opened up the wine list and it was like an encyclopedia. Amazing what they had on that list, particularly that they seemed to have ten different vintages of the same wines. Whisky? An amazing collection/selection of Scottish Water of Life.

I snagged their dinner menu for that night, prepared by Michael Gettier, Executive Chef.

Two Melon Soup with Mint Cream - A light chilled summer soup of canteloupe and honeydew melon with mint whipped cream. (This was served at the wedding reception and was not a highlight. It was served in a martini glass with the orange canteloupe soup on one side and the green honeydew on the other. I think they had to include some off-tasting thickeners to keep the two sides apart.)

Terrine de Lotte, Sauce Tomate - Delicate terrine of monkfish, served chilled with a fresh herb tomato coulis

Tarte of Escargot and Wild Mushroom - Pastry tarte of tender escargots combined with wild mushroom and cognac cream

Roquefort Beignet with Apple Puree - Crispy beignet of Roquefort cheese, served on a bed of chunky apple puree

Wild and Gathered Greens Salad

Intermezzo

Filet Mignon with Bacon and Walnut - Black Angus filet of beef wrapped with bacon, served with walnut sauce and Madeira demiglace

Roast Rockfish with Clams and Leek - Fillet of wild rockfish in a sauce with little neck clams and leek, served with bacon and tomato gnocchi

Madeira Glazied Veal with Lobster - Veal tenderloin medallion with half a lobster tail served with roasted corn. Served with Vin Blanc sauce

Pan Roasted Lamb Roulade - Lamb loin chops rolled with asparagus and ham, seared and roasted, served with morel demiglace

Aside from that soup, I can't really judge the food that the inn would serve. It's unfair to compare the delivery of 80 wedding entrees in a separate building to what the main kitchen can do. But the atmosphere inside that inn was neat. If anything, a place to mainline some whisky in a very comfortable setting.

Has anyone else been to/heard of this place?

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I've heard of it and been to it. And, funny enough, I was just thinking of making reservations for a dinner with my parents, who are recent transplants to the middle of nowhere, for an upcoming birthday.

We went for dinner several summers ago, mostly because we really liked Michael Gettier's restaurant in Baltimore, M. Gettier. The good news is that it is an enjoyable evening, starting with hors d'oeuvres in and around what is a pretty building with pretty grounds. You move on to the smokehouse for dinner. The smokehouse, not surprisingly, smells of smoke. I must confess that by the end of the evening, I found it slightly nauseating.

And, Gettier's food, while somewhat similar, just isn't the same (she whined) as it was when he had his tiny place in Fells Point. It is still good in very straight forward, pretty traditional kind of way but it seems heavier (which makes it too heavy for me). And, overall, the entire experience feels more conservative. All that said, I'm planning to go back, I think it will be a perfect place to celebrate my mom's bd.

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We went for dinner several summers ago, mostly because we really liked Michael Gettier's restaurant in Baltimore, M. Gettier. 

Once I called M. Gettier to make a reservation, and was supposed to ask for the chef, who was the friend of a friend. A gentleman answered at about 3 PM, and I asked to speak with Mr. Get-Eee-Ay... he replied, "this is Michael Get-Eee-Urr..."

And I'm going to begin reprimanding members who continue to spell "Tom Power" with an "s" on the end, and also those who triple-space when quoting a post.

Rocks.

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Once I called M. Gettier to make a reservation, and was supposed to ask for the chef, who was the friend of a friend.  A gentleman answered at about 3 PM, and I asked to speak with Mr. Get-Eee-Ay... he replied, "this is Michael Get-Eee-Urr..."

And I'm going to begin reprimanding members who continue  to spell "Tom Power" with an "s" on the end, and also those who triple-space when quoting a post.

Rocks.

Of course, if we type an "s" at the end of Tom Power, it'll help keep us from calling him Mr. Pow-Ay. :P
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The great Gettier pronunciation quandary was the source of much angst. Do you pronounce it as he does and look like the prole that I so often do or do you pronounce it “correctly” which isn’t actually how he pronounces it? Life can be complicated.

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I had a memorable meal there back in the summer of 2002. Very good. Very relaxed and great service. Oh and the 1971 a good wino friend shared with us that night was quite, quite good. I know I'll never have the chance to drink that again.

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I'm actually heading there for a Wedding in June, and am very much excited. I've heard only good things about this place, and the food.

I think all of their landscaping is finally mature enough to block out the view of the Sheetz gas place across the street, too.

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10/29/13 - "The Posh Antrim 1844 Has a New Chef" on baltimoremagazine.net

I've stayed at Antrim 1844 in the past, but that was *before* Michael Gettier became chef, which must have been a decade ago or longer, and I've been to his M. Gettier restaurant in Baltimore back in the early 1990s - it's downright weird that I missed him, but I just never had the occasion to head up to Taneytown; now, I'm regretting it.

The menu under Spencer Wolff looks just fine, however, and I'm sure this place is still a wonderful weekend getaway. (The article also talks about what Gettier will be doing going forward.)

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My wife and I were fortunate to have visited Saturday night - what a wonderful meal. 

As has been the case there for many years, you start the meal upstairs on the main level of the mansion, sitting on couches in a couple of rooms while hors d'oeuvres are brought around, cocktail-party style.   In reviews I've read, this seems to throw some folks off as it seems like the restaurant doesn't have a table ready for you.  But that's not the case and the 30 minutes or so is a nice 'wind down' from coming in from outside. 

The dining rooms are downstairs in a cellar-like setting, very cozy. 

We enjoyed the six course meal with a wine pairing for my wife.  Everything was delicious (OK, that's not enough of a description...I'll describe one dish...)

My wife ordered a vegetarian main, not on the menu, as created by the chef.   It was terrific - a mix of quinoa, bulgur, farro, and something else, each individually cooked, then some toasted and mixed with consommé.  It was served with another vegetable side and a bit of sauce that was made from a red wine and included tiny bits of onion cracker.   It was really, really good.

I can't wait to go back and to bring my kids who are middle / high school age.   I think it is important to occasionally bring them to places like this to show them how things *could* be - if they work hard, if they slow down, if they develop a taste for the finer things in life. 

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