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Calvados


edenman
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Another thought -- not that drinking it's a bad idea at all -- make a buerre blanc only, instead of wine and white wine vinegar, use your calvados and some grocery "balsamic" (or drizzle some of the good stuff into an otherwise completed sauce). Serve over a grilled pork chop, with fried apples w/ red onion on the side.

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How old is it? Some of the 'young' stuff is REALLY rough. In Normandy you can find a drink called Pommeau which a Calvados/hard cider blend - pretty good. I think Derek Brown actually served me some Pommeau back in his Firefly days.

Along the same lines as Waitman's suggestion - I've made a tasty sauce of Calvados with Dijon mustard, cream, shallots, and mushrooms for pork chops. Browned the shallots and mushrooms, deglazed with Calvados, added some heavy cream and the mustard to taste and served over the pork.

Having had the privilege of tasting a '44 Calvados, I can tell you that age definitely does make a difference. I can also tell you that my host at the time was VERY upset to discover that his staff had used some of this very special Calvados (which he was planning to serve to some D-Day veterans that evening) for cooking :blink: . He was "affolé" to say the least....

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How old is it? Some of the 'young' stuff is REALLY rough.

Although it has no year on it, internet research seems to indicate that my bottle is the "minimum 2 years" aged stuff. $35/bottle at the liquor store next door to WF on P st. Will keep my eyes open for older stuff next time I'm out buying obscure liquors.

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Le Trou Normande refers to the practice of a small glass of calvados between the fish and meat course in a large meal. Translated it meand the Normand Hole referring to the "hole" in your stomach produced by the firey liquid that allowed you to down another course filled with butter and cream. Better than what the Imperial era Romans did to allow themselves to eat more....

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Le Trou Normande refers to the practice of a small glass of calvados between the fish and meat course in a large meal. Translated it meand the Normand Hole referring to the "hole" in your stomach produced by the firey liquid that allowed you to down another course filled with butter and cream. Better than what the Imperial era Romans did to allow themselves to eat more....

Yes, as opposed to the Trou Gascogne (Gascon hole) which is a shot of Armagnac at some point that allows you to keep eating parts of ducks and pigs you never knew existed. :blink:

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I remember a dinner given by D'Artagnan in San Francisco in association with the Chaine des Rotisseurs where Ariane Daughin came to discuss the various dishes we were having. I was in SF at the Fancy Food Show on behalf of Whole Foods and was one of Ariane's biggest customers so I was invited to the dinner (I was the only one in a Hawaiian shirt amongst the Black Tie but I was also seated next to Ariane...

There was a soup with three oval shaped objects on a skewer in each portion. One was a green olive, one a black olive and the third was a whitish object with a faintly liverish flavor and a slightly springy texture. Ariane asked the group what the third object was. Most guessed it was some sort of rare chestnut as the soup obviously had a chestnut base. She then gave us a hint (by that time I knew what is was) that it was called the white olive of Gascone. Finally when the group ran out of things to guess, I said sotto voce (quietly but loud enough for the entire room to hear) "Duck Balls!" and Arianne just smiled at the thought of 200 San Franciscans in Black Tie (and one Angelino in not) having been enticed to eat 100 pair of duck gonads. In fact, several of my table mates hurriedly gave me the remains of their servings which I finished with relish (well smugness and not the green stuff!)!

She later explained that is was traditional for Gascognes to serve unknown visitors to their favorite restuarnts a duck ball or two, and then to tell them what they ate. If the folk reacted positvely they were welcome in the local restaurant, if not, well if not the gfolk usually just dashed for the exit!

Having had balls of many animals (as well as what is so cutely labeled Pizzle at HMart's frozen section, I can honestly say that ducks have the best tasting balls I have ever munched on (short of the crunchy balls of felafel at Max's in Wheaton). But after dining on several, I wopuld be ready for a Trou Gascogne!

As Ariane said that night, "It takes balls to make one a true gourmet!"

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