Jump to content

Duck Breasts


Alex
 Share

Recommended Posts

I'll be in DC next week for a convention and to visit my cousins. (Please also see my Corduroy thread.) I'm in charge of dinner for seven on the 20th and decided to grill some marinated duck breasts for the entree. Now all I need to do is find them, as my cousins don't have a clue. Please quack a reply if you have any info. Thanks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'll be in DC next week for a convention and to visit my cousins. (Please also see my Corduroy thread.) I'm in charge of dinner for seven on the 20th and decided to grill some marinated duck breasts for the entree. Now all I need to do is find them, as my cousins don't have a clue. Please quack a reply if you have any info. Thanks.

Head down to Capitol Hill and visit Eastern Market. There are a couple of bird vendors there and they could help you out. If you haven't been to this area of DC before, it's worth a visit for an out-of-towner.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Wegman's in Sterling (and probably the closer in one in Fairfax) carry d'Artangan duck products including skin-on boneless breasts.

I wouldn't be surprised if Whole Foods carried them too.

I made a d'Artanagan duck breast last night. I picked up from the Wegman's in Fairfax. This was a Jenna Jameson sized breast, and was more than enough for my wife and I. Simply pan seared and served with a peach/apple salsa. I have also had luck finding them at Balducci's.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Would you believe I'll be getting them from BlackSalt Market? I spoke with Scott, the manager, last Saturday, and after ordering some scallops I mentioned that I also was looking for some duck breasts. Right away he said, "Let me see what I can do." He checked with his purveyors, and sure enough, he could get not one, but three kinds: regular Pekin, Muscovy, and magrets. It looks like they might be more expensive than the other places, but it's convenient and I know they'll be top quality. Cool.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not a huge fan of duck, but have on occasion had wonderful versions at restaurants. Mr. MV loves duck, and I'd like to cook it for him. I wanted to start by preparing duck breast, not a whole duck.

I asked at Pecan Meadows at the 14th St. market, but he only had whole duck. Does anyone know who carries duck breast?

Thanks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not a huge fan of duck, but have on occasion had wonderful versions at restaurants. Mr. MV loves duck, and I'd like to cook it for him. I wanted to start by preparing duck breast, not a whole duck.

I asked at Pecan Meadows at the 14th St. market, but he only had whole duck. Does anyone know who carries duck breast?

Thanks.

At arrowine they had raw d'artagnan duck breasts last time I went, which was a couple weeks ago.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not a huge fan of duck, but have on occasion had wonderful versions at restaurants. Mr. MV loves duck, and I'd like to cook it for him. I wanted to start by preparing duck breast, not a whole duck.

I asked at Pecan Meadows at the 14th St. market, but he only had whole duck. Does anyone know who carries duck breast?

Thanks.

Groff's Content Farm. They sell at Penn Quarter on Thursdays, and on Saturdays, Silver Spring and I think at Mt. Pleasant, too. Muscovy ducks as is the case at the 14th St. market. I'd email or call the farm in advance, though, since inventory changes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

They carry d'Artagnan boneless duck breasts at Balducci's and Wegman's, at least they have in the past.

You may want to branch out and get a whole duck--so much goodness there with a little bit of work. Remove the breast meat and save the fat that renders out when you cook them, cure the legs with salt and thyme for a few days, remove the skin from the rest of the carcass, chop it up and render in the oven, save the fat and savor the cracklings. Make duck stock with the wings and frame, and confit the cured legs in the rendered fat (you may have to supplement the duck fat with the fat from a second bird in order to submerge the legs in fat --but then you could do 4 legs), or add lard to the duck fat, which I have done on numerous occasions. Afterward, you'll have some wonderfully flavorful fat, to use for frying potatoes or making refried beans, which will keep in the refrigerator for a year. And duck leg confit is luscious beyond belief...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...