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Copper Pot Food Company Jams


Lola007
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I have bought the peach and prosecco jam at the U Street Farmer's Market and loved it. The chef is there most Saturday mornings.

Thanks!

I'm no jam expert, but I found the peach and prosecco jam kind of ... mushy? like the fruit was cooked down too much (at least to my taste). I like his pasta and pasta sauces much better.

It would probably be better if I could taste it before buying it b/c mushy doesn't appeal to me. I should say that I'm not a jam expert either, but in addition to flavor, texture/consistency is important to me.

P.S. The sauces do look enticing! :P

We have one of the bourbon ones (sour cherry?) and it is really strong. Tasty but strong. As in--don't let the toddler have any.

Good to know! I'm something of a lightweight, so that's helpful info.

Thanks everyone! This board is fantastic. :(

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Markets where you can find Copper Pot:

Thursday at the Penn Quarter Market

Saturday at 14th and U

Sunday at the Bloomingdale Market.

Thanks, I guess they're brand new at Penn Quarter. That location isn't listed on Copper Pot's web site (http://www.copperpotfoodco.com/html/findus.html), but is on the Freshfarm market site (http://freshfarmmarkets.org/markets/penn_quarter.html).

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He was at Vermont Ave. this afternoon. I got some of the peach and prosecco jam but haven't tried it yet. I can say it looks more like a chutney or a fruit butter than a jam - more like fruit that's been cooked down for a really long time.

As far as the non-jam or sauce offerings go, the Virginia ham and parmesan tortellini is very, very good.

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He was at Vermont Ave. this afternoon. I got some of the peach and prosecco jam but haven't tried it yet. I can say it looks more like a chutney or a fruit butter than a jam - more like fruit that's been cooked down for a really long time.

Thanks, Hannah. If it's like a fruit butter, it may work even better for me than a jam as I'm thinking of making up a cheese plate with jellies that I'll pair with Prosecco. Spreading a fruit butter on slices of baguette won't be as messy as a thick jam.

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Thanks, Hannah. If it's like a fruit butter, it may work even better for me than a jam as I'm thinking of making up a cheese plate with jellies that I'll pair with Prosecco. Spreading a fruit butter on slices of baguette won't be as messy as a thick jam.

That's more or less what I was thinking when I bought it - it looks like it will go really well with cheese.
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Update: straight out of the jar, unrefrigerated, it is definitely more like a fruit spread than jam, but is also pretty juicy. Flavor's good though - very nice concentrated peach with a little undertone of the prosecco. I assume it'll firm up a little in the fridge, so I'll give it another try tonight and see how it goes.

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Update: straight out of the jar, unrefrigerated, it is definitely more like a fruit spread than jam, but is also pretty juicy. Flavor's good though - very nice concentrated peach with a little undertone of the prosecco. I assume it'll firm up a little in the fridge, so I'll give it another try tonight and see how it goes.

Thanks for the update, Hannah. Sounds like a winner. Anyway, I need an alternative to Bonne Maman.

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Just curious: why?

Well, sometimes it's good to change. I always have Bonne Maman strawberry and fig preserves at home. And like I said before, if the Peach and Prosecco jam is like a fruit butter (and from what I've heard, it seems to be), it will go well with cheese. Unfortunately, the weather didn't cooperate today, so I didn't make it to the Penn Quarter market to pick up the jam. Will probably have to wait until next week...

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Great news -- Stefano got into Dupont Market, and will be starting there in January. I talked to him at the U Street Market last week, and he was sweating the application process...but it looks like everything worked out. Really looking forward to having a nearby winter source for his pastas.

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Great news -- Stefano got into Dupont Market, and will be starting there in January. I talked to him at the U Street Market last week, and he was sweating the application process...but it looks like everything worked out. Really looking forward to having a nearby winter source for his pastas.

His jams and sauces are also at Cork Market on 14th Street and S...... but not the pastas, alas

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His jams and sauces are also at Cork Market on 14th Street and S...... but not the pastas, alas

On Saturdays, you can find The Cooper Pot at the new winter market in Silver Spring, too.*

Sundays when Stefano is selling his full line of products at the farmers market inside the PNC parking lot, Dupont Circle, you can also find his wares at the farmers market at Takoma Park (which closes an hour later at 2 PM).

As I mentioned in the dinner thread yesterday, you might want to ask for suggestions in saucing your pasta. Molly, the vendor selling Stefano's goodies at Takoma Park, is a CIA-trained professional cook, so it's likely that she could help you out, too.

*Link to FRESHFARM Markets website just in case you want to see if it's open on a snowy day: click. (Also check the farmers market forum here, though there are no guarantees a DR member will have time to post updates.)

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Simply produced without pectin or other thickening agents. Most reduced, not to consistency of butters, but to point of being less "gelled". Stick a spoon in a jar of pectin-laced preserves and it will stand upright. In Copper Pot's jars? It'll slide.

"Laced?" That makes it sound like a poison. Pectin is a naturally occurring substance.

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"Laced?" That makes it sound like a poison. Pectin is a naturally occurring substance.

Poisons occur naturally, too. 3rd def in my computer's dictionary for the verb reads "add an ingredient (to drink or dish) to enhance its flavor or strength", but I confess to writing this particular post without consulting any sort of reference tool and I chose my words rather spontaneously.

Merely trying to distinguish the looser consistency of the preserves from that of thicker jams including those to which a powdered form of pectin is added. I am fully aware of pectin-rich properties of apples, for example. I know how to reduce mixtures on a stove, too. If the post proves offensive to any other jam makers, trust that slights were not intended.

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There was a nice mention of Stephano's company in an article by Missy Frederick in Friday's Washington Business Journal:

After working as a professional chef in area restaurants like Mio and Maestro, Stefano Frigerio found himself as a stay-at-home dad, using his spare time to whip up jams in the kitchen. As the jams began piling up, he decided to go the entrepreneurial route and try selling his jams at area farmers markets under the moniker Copper Pot Food Co.
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